Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 07-09-2005, 12:15 AM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default Graham cracker crust questions..

For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping" crumbs
up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would have
helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck

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Old 07-09-2005, 02:22 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping" crumbs
up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would have
helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck


The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to work
with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put the
mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it down and
up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top, just up an inch
or two.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2005, 11:51 AM
Mr Libido Incognito
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Vox Humana wrote on 06 Sep 2005 in rec.food.baking


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping"
crumbs up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would
have helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck


The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to
work with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put
the mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it
down and up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top,
just up an inch or two.




A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-09-2005, 02:43 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote in message
...
A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.


Or you can buy cinnamon grams.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-09-2005, 07:45 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 10:51:34 -0000, Mr Libido Incognito
wrote:

Vox Humana wrote on 06 Sep 2005 in rec.food.baking



Chuck" wrote in message

...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping"
crumbs up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would
have helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck


The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to
work with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put
the mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it
down and up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top,
just up an inch or two.




A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.


We cut the New York style cheesecake today.. served with Comstock
brand blueberry pie filling.. Best cheesecake I've ever eaten... and
I try it every where I see it offered! (just ask my doctor..)

Here's were I got the recipe
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/re...s/views/102592
(My next cheesecake is going to be a "Key Lime Cheesecake" from the
same site..)
I didn't use a water bath as I need to buy a pan the right
shape/depth.
It didn't crack, looked great, tasted even better.
I always read the reviews prior to trying new recipe.. as I did this
time.. Following others suggestions, I made the following
adjustments to recipe: Initial temperature of 500 degrees F. for 10
minutes then change temperature to 200 degrees, opening door of oven 5
inches for 2 minutes to let it cool to 200 a little quicker. Then cook
at 200 for about 1 hr 40 minutes.

Now new problem... I cut the cheesecake at work.. now everyone wants
one! Considering the low cook temp (200 degrees) should I expect
any problems cooking 2 or 3 cheesecakes on same rack at same time? or
should I raise both racks higher and use top and center levels of
oven? (this is a home, electric, non-convection oven)
They wouldn't be too crowded, maybe turn cakes after 45 minutes or
so? or shift those from middle shelf to top shelf and top to middle?

Another question: Will freezing lemon and orange zest hurt its
flavor? It would keep me from having to buy two lemons and two oranges
at a time to make sure they're fresh..
Now to find where I can get cream cheese in bulk!

Thanks for the advice
Chuck


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-09-2005, 07:51 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 08 Sep 2005 18:45:18 GMT, Chuck wrote:

On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 10:51:34 -0000, Mr Libido Incognito
wrote:

Vox Humana wrote on 06 Sep 2005 in rec.food.baking



Chuck" wrote in message
...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping"
crumbs up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would
have helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck

The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to
work with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put
the mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it
down and up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top,
just up an inch or two.




A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.


We cut the New York style cheesecake today.. served with Comstock
brand blueberry pie filling.. Best cheesecake I've ever eaten... and
I try it every where I see it offered! (just ask my doctor..)

Here's were I got the recipe
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/re...s/views/102592
(My next cheesecake is going to be a "Key Lime Cheesecake" from the
same site..)
I didn't use a water bath as I need to buy a pan the right
shape/depth.
It didn't crack, looked great, tasted even better.
I always read the reviews prior to trying new recipe.. as I did this
time.. Following others suggestions, I made the following
adjustments to recipe: Initial temperature of 500 degrees F. for 10
minutes then change temperature to 200 degrees, opening door of oven 5
inches for 2 minutes to let it cool to 200 a little quicker. Then cook
at 200 for about 1 hr 40 minutes.

Now new problem... I cut the cheesecake at work.. now everyone wants
one! Considering the low cook temp (200 degrees) should I expect
any problems cooking 2 or 3 cheesecakes on same rack at same time? or
should I raise both racks higher and use top and center levels of
oven? (this is a home, electric, non-convection oven)
They wouldn't be too crowded, maybe turn cakes after 45 minutes or
so? or shift those from middle shelf to top shelf and top to middle?

Another question: Will freezing lemon and orange zest hurt its
flavor? It would keep me from having to buy two lemons and two oranges
at a time to make sure they're fresh..
Now to find where I can get cream cheese in bulk!

Thanks for the advice
Chuck

I found the answer to the orange and lemon zest he
http://www.sunkist.com/products/buyi...g_handling.asp
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-09-2005, 09:13 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 10:51:34 -0000, Mr Libido Incognito
wrote:

Vox Humana wrote on 06 Sep 2005 in rec.food.baking



Chuck" wrote in message
...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping"
crumbs up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would
have helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck

The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to
work with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put
the mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it
down and up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top,
just up an inch or two.




A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.


We cut the New York style cheesecake today.. served with Comstock
brand blueberry pie filling.. Best cheesecake I've ever eaten... and
I try it every where I see it offered! (just ask my doctor..)

Here's were I got the recipe
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/re...s/views/102592
(My next cheesecake is going to be a "Key Lime Cheesecake" from the
same site..)
I didn't use a water bath as I need to buy a pan the right
shape/depth.
It didn't crack, looked great, tasted even better.
I always read the reviews prior to trying new recipe.. as I did this
time.. Following others suggestions, I made the following
adjustments to recipe: Initial temperature of 500 degrees F. for 10
minutes then change temperature to 200 degrees, opening door of oven 5
inches for 2 minutes to let it cool to 200 a little quicker. Then cook
at 200 for about 1 hr 40 minutes.

Now new problem... I cut the cheesecake at work.. now everyone wants
one! Considering the low cook temp (200 degrees) should I expect
any problems cooking 2 or 3 cheesecakes on same rack at same time? or
should I raise both racks higher and use top and center levels of
oven? (this is a home, electric, non-convection oven)
They wouldn't be too crowded, maybe turn cakes after 45 minutes or
so? or shift those from middle shelf to top shelf and top to middle?

Another question: Will freezing lemon and orange zest hurt its
flavor? It would keep me from having to buy two lemons and two oranges
at a time to make sure they're fresh..
Now to find where I can get cream cheese in bulk!

Thanks for the advice
Chuck


You will find that ovens have hot spots. The back of the oven is warmer
than the front. Putting three cakes in the oven at once will probably
extend the baking time a little, The cake on the upper shelf will brown
more and be done sooner than the one on the lower shelf. If you have three
on one shelf the one in the rear will be done sooner than the one in the
front. You will have to keep an eye on them and shift the pans as
necessary.

The recipe you linked to is one that I used for some time (although I got it
from a 1960s era cookbook). It makes a substantial cake. I find that the
large number of yolks can leave a distinct "eggy" flavor. I like it, but
switched to the recipe that I posted. It is all a matter of personal
taste - and how bad can any cheesecake be? I don't think I ever had a
cheesecake that I didn't like - except for the "no bake" abominations from
boxes that taste like they came from Dupont lab.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-09-2005, 10:22 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 08 Sep 2005 20:13:20 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 10:51:34 -0000, Mr Libido Incognito
wrote:

Vox Humana wrote on 06 Sep 2005 in rec.food.baking


Chuck" wrote in message
...
For cheesecakes I've made in past, I've always used a
flour-sugar-butter and one egg yoke dough for the crust. Keeping
spring form pan, and dough chilled, the dough could be sliced and
formed to thickness needed to go up side of pan and stay there till
filling was added.. (makes a "plain cookie" type crust..)

Today (for the first time) I'm making a graham cracker crusted
cheesecake. The recipe called for crumbs, sugar and melted butter.
Even tried chilling "dough" I couldn't get it to stick to side of
chilled or room temperature pan. I instead settled on "ramping"
crumbs up to side of pan.. I think a higher butter content would
have helped.. Any ideas?
(It's still in the oven.. so I don't know results yet..)
Thanks
Chuck

The crumbs don't make a dough. It looks like you figured out how to
work with it. You could add more butter if you want. I generally put
the mixture in the bottom of the pan and use a glass or mug to tamp it
down and up the sides of the pan. Of course, it won't go to the top,
just up an inch or two.




A dash of cinnamon helps the taste in a graham waffer crust.


We cut the New York style cheesecake today.. served with Comstock
brand blueberry pie filling.. Best cheesecake I've ever eaten... and
I try it every where I see it offered! (just ask my doctor..)

Here's were I got the recipe
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/re...s/views/102592
(My next cheesecake is going to be a "Key Lime Cheesecake" from the
same site..)
I didn't use a water bath as I need to buy a pan the right
shape/depth.
It didn't crack, looked great, tasted even better.
I always read the reviews prior to trying new recipe.. as I did this
time.. Following others suggestions, I made the following
adjustments to recipe: Initial temperature of 500 degrees F. for 10
minutes then change temperature to 200 degrees, opening door of oven 5
inches for 2 minutes to let it cool to 200 a little quicker. Then cook
at 200 for about 1 hr 40 minutes.

Now new problem... I cut the cheesecake at work.. now everyone wants
one! Considering the low cook temp (200 degrees) should I expect
any problems cooking 2 or 3 cheesecakes on same rack at same time? or
should I raise both racks higher and use top and center levels of
oven? (this is a home, electric, non-convection oven)
They wouldn't be too crowded, maybe turn cakes after 45 minutes or
so? or shift those from middle shelf to top shelf and top to middle?

Another question: Will freezing lemon and orange zest hurt its
flavor? It would keep me from having to buy two lemons and two oranges
at a time to make sure they're fresh..
Now to find where I can get cream cheese in bulk!

Thanks for the advice
Chuck


You will find that ovens have hot spots. The back of the oven is warmer
than the front. Putting three cakes in the oven at once will probably
extend the baking time a little, The cake on the upper shelf will brown
more and be done sooner than the one on the lower shelf. If you have three
on one shelf the one in the rear will be done sooner than the one in the
front. You will have to keep an eye on them and shift the pans as
necessary.

The recipe you linked to is one that I used for some time (although I got it
from a 1960s era cookbook). It makes a substantial cake. I find that the
large number of yolks can leave a distinct "eggy" flavor. I like it, but
switched to the recipe that I posted. It is all a matter of personal
taste - and how bad can any cheesecake be? I don't think I ever had a
cheesecake that I didn't like - except for the "no bake" abominations from
boxes that taste like they came from Dupont lab.


I missed your recipe.. would you re post it for me?
Thanks
Chuck
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-09-2005, 11:10 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...

I missed your recipe.. would you re post it for me?


-------------------
If you don't want to bother with the sponge layer, just substitute your
crumb crust or a cookie dough crust. The sponge layer is unexpected and a
nice change from the traditional cheesecake, so if you have the time you
should try it.

=======================
Junior's Cheesecake
Sponge Cake Layer
Preheat oven to 350
Grease a 9 inch springform pan.

1/2 cup sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
pinch of salt
3 eggs, separated
1/3 cup sugar plus 2 tablespoons
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 drops lemon extract
3 tablespoons melted butter
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter

Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a medium bowl and set aside.
Beat egg yolks with an electric mixer on high for 3 minutes. Gradually add
the sugar and beat until the mixture is light and lemon colored - about 5
more minutes. Beat in the vanilla and lemon extracts.
Sift the flour mixture over the beaten egg yolks and stir by hand until well
blended. Then blend in the butter.
In a clean bowl with clean beaters, combine the egg whites and cream of
tarter. Beat until foamy and then gradually add the reserved 2 tablespoons
of sugar. Continue beating until the egg whites form stiff peaks.
Combine about of the beaten egg whites with the flour mixture and mix
until well combined. Then gently fold in the remaining egg whites.
Carefully spread the batter on the bottom of the pan and bake for about 10
minutes or until the cake springs back when pressed with your finger. Set
aside to cool.

Cheesecake Layer (Plain)
4 8oz packages of cream cheese (not low fat)
1 2/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon vanilla
2 eggs
3/4 cup heavy whipping cream

Preheat Oven to 350F
Combined one package of cream cheese, 1/3 cup sugar, and the cornstarch in
the bowl of an electric mixer and beat on low speed until creamy, about 3
minutes.
Add the remaining cream cheese, one package at a time and beat until smooth.
Increase the speed to high and add the remaining sugar and eggs, one at a
time. Beat thoroughly after each addition.
Stop the mixer and blend in the cream and vanilla by hand.
Pour the batter over the baked cake in the springform pan.
Wrap the bottom of the pan with heavy duty foil. Set the foil lined pan in
another slightly larger pan. Pour enough boiling water into the outer pan
to submerge 1 inch of the springform pan.
Bake for about 1 hour or until the center of the cake barely jiggles when it
is shaken. Let the cake cool in the oven for about an hour with the door
ajar. Let the cake cool for another hour outside the oven on a wire rack.
Slide a knife between the cake and the pan and then release the sides of the
pan. Wrap with plastic film and chill in the refrigerator over night.


Pumpkin Cheesecake
1 recipe of sponge layer
1 recipe cheesecake layer

1 cup solid pack pumpkin
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves


Preheat the oven to 350
Mix the pumpkin with the spices and set aside.
Make the cheesecake as above. Beat in the spiced pumpkin mixture after the
addition of the eggs. Mix in cream and bake as directed above.

Chocolate Marble Cheesecake
1 recipe sponge layer
1 recipe cheesecake
3/4 cup store bought fudge ice cream topping

Preheat the oven to 350F
Prepare cheesecake. Pour half the batter over the sponge layer.
Melt the fudge ice cream topping in a double boiler or microwave. Combine
with the remaining batter. Pour over the plain batter and draw a table
knife through the cake to create a marble pattern.
Bake as directed above. Cover the pan with foil after about 45 minutes of
baking to prevent over browning.

Apple Crumb Cheesecake
1 recipe of sponge layer
1 recipe of cheesecake layer

Apple layer
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
2 tablespoons all purpose four
1 tablespoon cornstarch
teaspoon cinnamon
1 pounds tart-sweet apples
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Crumb topping
1 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
6 tablespoons unsalted cold butter, cut into small pieces
1/4 cup shortening
1/4 teaspoon lemon extracts
1/3 cup sifted confectioner's sugar

Preheat the oven to 350F
For the apples layer, mix the sugars, flour, cornstarch and cinnamon and set
aside
Peel, core, and slice the apples 1/4 inch thick (you will need 4 cups of
apples). Drizzle with the lemon juice and toss with the sugar mixture.
Spread about 2/3 of the apples over the baked sponge layer.
Spread the cheesecake batter over the apples. Starting about 2 inches from
the edge of the pan, push the remaining apples into the batter until they
are almost completely submerged.
Bake as directed above in the water bath for about 1 1/4 hours or until the
center barely jiggles when you shake the pan, When top sets and starts to
brown, (about 50 minutes) cover the pan with foil for the remainder of the
baking time.
While the cake is baking prepare the crumb topping. Mix the flour, brown
sugar, and cinnamon together in a medium bowl. Work the butter and
shortening into the mixture with your fingers or a pastry blender until the
mixture looks like coarse crumbs about the size of small peas. Stir in the
lemon extract.
After the cake is completely cooled, top with the crumb topping and sprinkle
with the confectioner's sugar. Cover the cake with plastic wrap and
refrigerate it until serving time.







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