Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 25-07-2005, 02:06 PM
Bill
 
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Default Vollkornbrot english recipe

I recently tasted a wonderful Vollkornbrot bread from a bakery.
I have searched for a vollkornbrot recipe written in english but
cannot find one.
Would some kind soul either post the recipe here or e-mail it to me at

Thank you all in advance. I enjoy reading through the
informationcontained in this forum.
Have a great day
Bill


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Old 25-07-2005, 03:27 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Bill" wrote in message
...
I recently tasted a wonderful Vollkornbrot bread from a bakery.
I have searched for a vollkornbrot recipe written in english but
cannot find one.
Would some kind soul either post the recipe here or e-mail it to me at

Thank you all in advance. I enjoy reading through the
informationcontained in this forum.
Have a great day
Bill


I did a quick Google search on "vollkornbrot recipe" (without the quotes)
and found several recipes in the first few hits along with recommendations
for books that also contained vollkornbrot recipes. Some links were no
longer available, but you can look at the cached page to see the
information.


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Old 25-07-2005, 08:35 PM
Roy
 
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recently tasted a wonderful Vollkornbrot bread from a bakery.
I have searched for a vollkornbrot recipe written in english but
cannot find one.

Vollkornbread brot is just simply whole,grain bread made with rye meal,
kibbled rye, rye groats, nutseeds and raised by natural sourdough.
IIRC the Hamelman's book ( Bread) had one or two versrion of such
product...Have a look at it in your nearest library

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Old 26-07-2005, 06:55 AM
Roy
 
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Mompeagram.... that is not the real vollkorn brot but a mockery of it
It is just like making a guick bread instead of the real bread..Yes
they contain the word 'bread 'but they are products unique from each
other.
The real thing is raised by sourdough starter leavened not by baking
soda.
The Krautz might crucify you for *******izing their breadgrin .
Roy.



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Old 26-07-2005, 02:19 PM
MOMPEAGRAM
 
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"Roy" wrote in message
oups.com...
Mompeagram.... that is not the real vollkorn brot but a mockery of it
It is just like making a guick bread instead of the real bread..Yes
they contain the word 'bread 'but they are products unique from each
other.
The real thing is raised by sourdough starter leavened not by baking
soda.
The Krautz might crucify you for *******izing their breadgrin .
Roy.

Actually, you are wrong. This recipe is from my x german sister in law in
Wuppertal, Germany. I have made it many times and it is exactly like the
Vollkornbrot you can buy here or in a can made in Germany.

MoM


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Old 26-07-2005, 02:20 PM
MOMPEAGRAM
 
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"Roy" wrote in message
oups.com...
Mompeagram.... that is not the real vollkorn brot but a mockery of it
It is just like making a guick bread instead of the real bread..Yes
they contain the word 'bread 'but they are products unique from each
other.
The real thing is raised by sourdough starter leavened not by baking
soda.
The Krautz might crucify you for *******izing their breadgrin .
Roy.

Also, Vollkornbrot is NOT a RAISED bread. It doesn't rise.

MoM


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Old 26-07-2005, 02:48 PM
Jens Richter
 
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On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 09:19:43 -0400, MOMPEAGRAM wrote:

[Vollkornbrot]
Actually, you are wrong. This recipe is from my x german sister in law in
Wuppertal, Germany. I have made it many times and it is exactly like the
Vollkornbrot you can buy here or in a can made in Germany.


Mhm, yes, it's possible but to take yeast/sourdough instead of baking soda
is more common. However, problem is the "molasses". For a German
Vollkornbrot ("Schwarzbrot") you need "Zuckerrübensaft" (brand:
Grafschafter e.g). It's a sort of molasse but it tastes absolutely
different to e.g. cane molasse/crude blackstrap molasse. In UK there is
only one (German) bakery in London where "Zuckerrübensaft" is available
but p&p is £9.90!

cheers
Jens
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Old 26-07-2005, 07:00 PM
MOMPEAGRAM
 
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"Jens Richter" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 09:19:43 -0400, MOMPEAGRAM wrote:

[Vollkornbrot]
Actually, you are wrong. This recipe is from my x german sister in law
in
Wuppertal, Germany. I have made it many times and it is exactly like the
Vollkornbrot you can buy here or in a can made in Germany.


Mhm, yes, it's possible but to take yeast/sourdough instead of baking soda
is more common. However, problem is the "molasses". For a German
Vollkornbrot ("Schwarzbrot") you need "Zuckerrübensaft" (brand:
Grafschafter e.g). It's a sort of molasse but it tastes absolutely
different to e.g. cane molasse/crude blackstrap molasse. In UK there is
only one (German) bakery in London where "Zuckerrübensaft" is available
but p&p is £9.90!

cheers
Jens


Wow! That's some expensive molasses.

All I know is I've been making this recipe since the late 60's. I've had
both the store bought types as well and they are very close in flavour and
texture.

I love it with cream cheese and candied ginger.

Yum

Helen


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Old 26-07-2005, 09:39 PM
Katharina
 
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I'm a 100% Kraut and I have a package of very dark Mestemacher Whole Rye
Bread With Muesli in front of me. The ingredients are as follows: whole
kernel rye, water, wholemeal rye, wholemeal wheat, oat flakes, nonsulphured
sultanas, whole hazelnuts, sunflower seed, flax seed, sesame, yeast and
salt.
Never had Vollkornbrot with baking soda. Molasses or Zuckerruebensaft is
only used in Pumpernickel.
I will try to post a recipe, but have to translate first.'
Katharina
"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote in message
news:[email protected] eranews...

"Roy" wrote in message
oups.com...
Mompeagram.... that is not the real vollkorn brot but a mockery of it
It is just like making a guick bread instead of the real bread..Yes
they contain the word 'bread 'but they are products unique from each
other.
The real thing is raised by sourdough starter leavened not by baking
soda.
The Krautz might crucify you for *******izing their breadgrin .
Roy.

Also, Vollkornbrot is NOT a RAISED bread. It doesn't rise.

MoM





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Old 26-07-2005, 09:47 PM
Katharina
 
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Here are two recipes. I have not tried them, but they look pretty good to
me. Probably not that dark,but whole grain.


Organic Multigrain Loaf

Recipe By : Dan Leader on Cooking Live
Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Breads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3/4 cups grain mix -- (4.4 ounces) *
Water to cover
2 cups unbleached -- (8.9 ounces)
organic flour
2 cups organic whole -- (8.9 ounces)
wheat flour
1 tablespoon malt
1 1/4 cups water -- (9.2 ounces)
1/2 cup sourdough levain -- (1.8 ounces)
1/3 cake compressed yeast
1 tablespoon sea salt

Soak grains in water overnight. Add flours, malt and 1 1/4 cups water. Let
rest 10 to 20 minutes. Add sourdough levain and yeast. Handknead 15 to 18
minutes (or knead with machine for 12 to 14 minutes on slow speed.). Add
salt in last 4 minutes of kneading. Let rise in greased bowl, covered with
a damp towel for 3 hours at 78 F. Divide dough and form into different
shapes. Bake in preheated 475 F oven for 15 minutes, then lower heat to 425
F and bake for anther 40 minutes.

Yield: 2 (1 pound 4 ounce) loaves
Prep Time: 11 hours 40 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

* (equal parts cracked wheat, rye, oats, millet, flax seeds)


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



--------------- MESSAGE bread-bakers.v101.n046.8 ---------------

From: "Ellen C."
Subject: Vollkornbrot
Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 12:28:42 -0400


Dan Leader was the guest star on Sara Moulton's Cooking Live in Dec,
2000, and the show was rebroadcast today.

This bread involves no kneading, and is a dense German bread. It
definitely caught my interest.

I'll also post the other breads from this show, all of which use
organic whole grains and looked fantastic.

Ellen
* Exported from MasterCook Mac *

Vollkornbrot

Recipe By : Dan Leader on Cooking Live
Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Breads Hand Made
Sourdough Breads Whole Grain & Cereal
Breads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 cups whole rye berries -- (13 ounces)
8 cups boiling spring -- (64 fl. ounces)
water
2 cups rye sourdough -- (18 ounces)
starter
8 cups medium ground -- (40 ounces)
rye flour
2 cups cracked rye -- (9 ounces)
1 tablespoon fine sea salt -- (3/4 ounce)

Soak the rye berries in about 6 cups of the hot spring water, or at least
enough to cover berries by 1-inch. Let stand 8 hours or overnight (if the
water becomes completely absorbed before soaking time has ended, add more
hot spring water to cover). Drain and reserve the soaking liquid. Add
enough fresh room-temperature spring water to the reserved soaking liquid
to measure 6 cups total. Reserve. Combine the starter, rye berries and
reserved 6 cups water in a 6-quart bowl. Break up the starter well with a
wooden spoon and stir until it loosens and the mixture is slightly frothy.
Add 1 cup (5 1/2 ounces) of the rye flour and all the cracked rye. Stir
well until combined. Add the salt and remaining flour. Stir until combined
and the mixture is wet and sticky. Take the dough's temperature - the ideal
is 78 F. Cover with a clean damp towel and put in a moderately warm (74 to
80 F) draft-free place.

Note: If the dough temperature is higher than 78 F put it in a
cooler than 78 F place, like the refrigerator, until the dough cools to 78
F. If it is lower than 78 F, put it in a warmer than 78 F place until the
dough warms to 78 F. The point is to try to keep the dough at 78 F during
its fermentation. If you have to move the dough, be gentle and don't jostle
it, or the dough might deflate.

The dough will become spongy but not springy, distinctly sour-smelling and
increased in volume by about 1/4. Generously grease 2 (5 by 9 by 3-inch)
loaf pans with vegetable shortening and dust with rye flour. Turn the dough
into the prepared pans. Smooth the tops with a wet thin flexible cake
spatula. Cover the loaves with a clean damp towel or plastic wrap and put
in a moderately warm (74 to 80 F) draft free place until the dough has
domed slightly and increased in volume again by 1/4. Bake on center rack of
a preheated 300 F oven until the loaves have shrunk from the sides of the
pan and the tops are dark brown and a toothpick inserted in the center
comes out clean, about 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Remove the loaves from the pans
and hold the loaves upside down. Strike the bottoms firmly with your
finger. If the sound is hollow, the breads are done. If it doesn't sound
hollow, bake 15 minutes longer. Cool the pans for 10 minutes, then remove
and cool completely on wire racks. Let the bread rest 24 to 36 hours before
eating. It is very moist in the center when removed from oven, but as it
cools the moisture distributes evenly throughout the bread. It will keep
for weeks at room temperature wrapped tightly in plastic wrap.

Yield: 2 (9 by 5-inch) loaves
Prep Time: 8 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 27 hours 25 minutes


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Old 26-07-2005, 10:17 PM
Roy
 
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Actually, you are wrong. This recipe is from my x german sister in law in
Wuppertal, Germany. I have made it many times and it is exactly like the
Vollkornbrot you can buy here or in a can made in Germany.


Your German sister in law is having its own delusion( and laziness
possibly) for not even atttempting to make the real product
..Unfortunately you are lucky enough to be influenced by such form of
thinking as well!


M&M Mompeagram,
I have made German type breads in the past and had done product
developments along this line when I was still employed as a research
baker in one company manufacturing prepared bread mixes.
I also toyed with your idea using the quick bread method but was
ridiculed by the German baking consultant for such petty
interpretation of their breads.
He told me bluntly ,,,only disperate and less informed people will
succumb to such shallow interpretation of their beloved breads!
..If you had only experienced and tasted the bread made with sourdough
and its variances and preference for native Germans for such kind of
product you will understand what I mean.
In my experience never you can equate a quick bread recipe with
biologically leavened bread.

Also, Vollkornbrot is NOT a RAISED bread. It doesn't rise.


Your interpretation of leavening or raising agents is shallow . that
every time you add yeast or chemical raising agents you are always
expanding the product like what you see with your cakes and well risen
bread.
German breads are not all like that.They have breads that contains
leavening agents that don't even change its size when baked nor have
an open grain which we can attribute to the presence of such raising or
leavening agents.
Leavening/raising agents is a broad term for any ingredient that
will interact in the dough or batter system to increase gas cell
size, so it can improve the texture by modifying the crumb structure
(but not necessarily the volum)
In bread, that is taken care of by yeast and lactobacteria; on the
other hand in batter system the chemical leavening agent also do the
same thing but in addition exerts its effect through the
neutralization process..
Therefore the chemical leavening agent such as baking powder, baking
soda and acid function differently from the biological leavening agents
such as yeast and other microbes.

Roy

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Old 27-07-2005, 02:09 AM
FREECYCLEMOM
 
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What do you mean by sourdough levain?

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Old 27-07-2005, 07:32 AM
Roy
 
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Here are two recipes. I have not tried them, but they look pretty good to
me. Probably not that dark,but whole grain


Katharina those recipes are reasonable versions of vollkornbrot....!

FREECYCLEMOM wrote:
What do you mean by sourdough levain?


Sourdough levain is synonymous with an active sourdough starter.

Roy

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Old 27-07-2005, 09:51 AM
Jens Richter
 
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On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 20:39:49 +0000, Katharina wrote:

I'm a 100% Kraut and I have a package of very dark Mestemacher Whole Rye
Bread With Muesli in front of me. [...]


That's *one* sort of "Vollkornbrot", but rather not the common bread we
called "Schwarzbrot" (the very dark full grain bread)

Never had Vollkornbrot with baking soda.


Right, baking soda is good for Bavarian Pretzels and other soda bread
stuff. Never used it for Vollkornbrot.

Molasses or Zuckerruebensaft is
only used in Pumpernickel.


Nope. Sorry, Pumpernickel is one sort of "Schwarzbrot" but Schwarzbrot
isn't always Pumpernickel. Zuckerrübensaft makes he dark color in all
sorts of Schwarzbrot.

Jens



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