Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 23-05-2005, 10:35 PM
stgagnon
 
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Default glazing a bundt cake

Greetings!

I just purchased a fancy "sand castle" bundt cake pan from Williams
Sonoma. I'm making a "Knights in Shining Armor" birthday cake for my
little boy. I'd like to glaze the cake with something that I can cover
the entire cake with (not just drizzles down the sides) but will not
hide the details of the sand castle mold. After glazing, I'd like to
further decorate it by putting candies on it and piping frosting on
some of the details.

So my question is this: What kind of glaze can I make that will be
thin enough to cover the cake completely by pouring and not so thick
that it hides the details.. or that it needs to be spread on, which
will certainly hide the details. Also, if it were thick enough also to
stick on candy embellishments that would be great, but I realize I may
need to just spread on buttercream in the places where I want to stick
things..

Thanks in advance for your advice!

Suzanne.


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Old 24-05-2005, 02:26 PM
stgagnon
 
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Default

Thank you both for your replies!

I was actually thinking ganache v poured fondant. How about that. I'm
smarter than I thought!
I would *love* to use a lemon glaze, but alas, the boy wants a
CHOCOLATE cake, naturally.
The sandcastle is going to sit atop a regular rectangular base. The
sandcastle part is for the kids,
covered with candy.. and visually impressive. The bottom part is for
the grownups. Same cake
in both parts.

So, I might just go with the fondant for the top so I can make it gray
like a castle... I'll use the pan as a reference and pipe on the
details that get obscured.

Then for the bottom I'll use something more delicious for the grownups.


Thanks again!
S.

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Old 24-05-2005, 03:07 PM
stgagnon
 
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Default

Hi-
A while back you posted a recipe for 'quick poured fondant'. (I would
include a link that here but I'm having trouble figuring out how to do
that easily. The article can be easily found by searching for "poured
fondant.")

In that posting you suggested pre-glazing the cake with melted apricot
jelly. Would you suggest that in this case?

Thanks-
S.

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Old 24-05-2005, 05:22 PM
stgagnon
 
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Default

That's a great site. Thanks.

It talks about putting on the apricot glaze to give the fondant
something to stick to.

Now I may be getting a little wacky.. but I'm starting to think about
the yummy chocolate taste of ganache.
What would happen if I used a *ganache* glaze under the fondant? Could
the fondant stick to that? Then the cake would have chocolate in the
frosting and I could also color the fondant to look like a stone
castle. Other than the extra work involved, do you think this would
work?

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Old 24-05-2005, 06:23 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default


"stgagnon" wrote in message
oups.com...
That's a great site. Thanks.

It talks about putting on the apricot glaze to give the fondant
something to stick to.

Now I may be getting a little wacky.. but I'm starting to think about
the yummy chocolate taste of ganache.
What would happen if I used a *ganache* glaze under the fondant? Could
the fondant stick to that? Then the cake would have chocolate in the
frosting and I could also color the fondant to look like a stone
castle. Other than the extra work involved, do you think this would
work?



It might work but if you only are looking for a chocolate flavor, there is a
much easier and less risky solution: serve the ganache/chocolate sauce on
the side. My perception is that the cake is primarily a centerpiece. As
you say, there is another cake for adults. In my experience, kids are just
as happy with a Hostess Ding Dong as they are with a fancy cake. Some people
don't like chocolate, so by serving it on the side, you give them an option.




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Old 24-05-2005, 07:24 PM
 
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You could also use a poured melted chocolate.

This would provide a hard shell of chocolate. If you do not want to
make your own one of the chocolate toppings made for ice cream would
work. Heat in water bath until runny and pour over cake on wire rack
on baking sheet to catch the runoff.



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