Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 18-04-2005, 12:34 AM
perspicacious
 
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Default why does my bread collapse?

Picture says it all...

http://epaperpress.com/temp/bread.jpg



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Old 18-04-2005, 12:37 AM
Mike Avery
 
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perspicacious wrote:

Picture says it all...

http://epaperpress.com/temp/bread.jpg




The usual causes of bread collapse are...

too liquid a dough, so the dough doesn't have enough strength to hold
together

too much riser, so the bread over-rises and then collapses

not enough kneading, so the bread dough isn't developed enough.

The most common cause is too much riser. Try cutting your yeast by
about 1/3, and then play with it from there. If you used a bread
machine, an excellent resource is any of the "Bread Machine Magic" books.

Mike


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Old 18-04-2005, 02:04 AM
Mary Beth Goodman
 
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In article ,
"perspicacious" wrote:

Picture says it all...

http://epaperpress.com/temp/bread.jpg


Not enough gluten development aka - needed more kneading or folding?

Perhaps too long a final rising time?

--
Mary Beth
Orientation::Quilter
http://www.quiltr.com
http://www.fruitcakesociety.org
http://homepage.mac.com/mbgoodman/bread05/
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Old 18-04-2005, 02:15 AM
Jenn Ridley
 
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"perspicacious" wrote:

Picture says it all...

http://epaperpress.com/temp/bread.jpg



Too much water, or too much yeast. (Or it was dropped on its top when
being removed from the pan, and/or cooled too quickly, but I'd go for
too much yeast.)


--
Jenn Ridley :
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Old 18-04-2005, 08:23 PM
[email protected]
 
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possibly underbaked .

what does it look like when cut in the middle ?

if the middle is not cooked you need to drop your oven temp a little
and bake longer.

If you are new to bread baking you should weigh the dough. The weight
will help tell if it is underprooffed.



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Old 18-04-2005, 09:42 PM
Rina
 
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If you are new to bread baking you should weigh the dough. The weight
will help tell if it is underprooffed.


How?


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Old 18-04-2005, 09:42 PM
Rina
 
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If you are new to bread baking you should weigh the dough. The weight
will help tell if it is underprooffed.


How?


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Old 19-04-2005, 12:25 AM
Janet Bostwick
 
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wrote in message
ups.com...
snip
If you are new to bread baking you should weigh the dough. The weight
will help tell if it is underprooffed.


Huh?


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Old 19-04-2005, 12:25 AM
Janet Bostwick
 
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wrote in message
ups.com...
snip
If you are new to bread baking you should weigh the dough. The weight
will help tell if it is underprooffed.


Huh?


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Old 19-04-2005, 04:13 AM
Sapphire
 
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Silly question - do you live in an elevated area? Sometimes that
effects how the dough rises once it is in the over.

I know for me, as silly as it sounds, sometimes it is to noisy in the
kitchen or it is when I open the door that the top falls.



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Old 19-04-2005, 04:13 AM
Sapphire
 
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Silly question - do you live in an elevated area? Sometimes that
effects how the dough rises once it is in the over.

I know for me, as silly as it sounds, sometimes it is to noisy in the
kitchen or it is when I open the door that the top falls.

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Old 19-04-2005, 06:31 AM
Janet Bostwick
 
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"Sapphire" wrote in message
oups.com...
Silly question - do you live in an elevated area? Sometimes that
effects how the dough rises once it is in the over.

I know for me, as silly as it sounds, sometimes it is to noisy in the
kitchen or it is when I open the door that the top falls.

You're right, that is silly. You are making bread, not a cake and the bread
should never fall because of noise or opening the oven door. The examples
that you cite mean that you have not developed the dough and gluten
properly, so there is nothing to support the loaf. Real bread dough can be
handled, without a pan to support it, without the dough collapsing.
Janet


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Old 22-04-2005, 11:19 PM
jimmyjames
 
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People bake bread like it is a one time thing. Are you in a high elevation
(above 500)?
you have to bake and bake and bake, at a normal elevation follow a recipe
exactly.
do it again
"perspicacious" wrote in message
...
Picture says it all...

http://epaperpress.com/temp/bread.jpg






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