Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:50 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Thanks for your response, Roy. Emma's my niece, not my daughter, but I
just translated those sentences to match. ;-)

This first bread baking will be with Emma assisting and observing. More
active participation will be as she wants. I'd given her the options of
cookies or bread for this weekend, and she said bread because she'd made
cookies before. "I've never baked bread before," she warned, and I
assured her that I wasn't relying on her for expertise, I was simply
offering a chance for her to learn how to do it. That met with firm
approval. I generally offer and accept what she chooses. I have some
really good goop for burns, just in case. Her mother is the
over-protective one. I'm more of the "the kid's going to have to learn,
and I'll inform her and then be there for her when it hurts" school.

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:50 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Thanks for your response, Roy. Emma's my niece, not my daughter, but I
just translated those sentences to match. ;-)

This first bread baking will be with Emma assisting and observing. More
active participation will be as she wants. I'd given her the options of
cookies or bread for this weekend, and she said bread because she'd made
cookies before. "I've never baked bread before," she warned, and I
assured her that I wasn't relying on her for expertise, I was simply
offering a chance for her to learn how to do it. That met with firm
approval. I generally offer and accept what she chooses. I have some
really good goop for burns, just in case. Her mother is the
over-protective one. I'm more of the "the kid's going to have to learn,
and I'll inform her and then be there for her when it hurts" school.

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:42 PM
Roy
 
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Priscilla IMO the recipe does not matter at all.
When my mom taught me how to make bread she just randomly selected
from her well used cookbook and simplified it for me and that's it!
Therefore I think that you are doing fine with extracting similar item
from your favorite cookbook.
Good Luck!
Roy

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:42 PM
Roy
 
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Priscilla IMO the recipe does not matter at all.
When my mom taught me how to make bread she just randomly selected
from her well used cookbook and simplified it for me and that's it!
Therefore I think that you are doing fine with extracting similar item
from your favorite cookbook.
Good Luck!
Roy

  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:57 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

"Priscilla Ballou" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in

the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make

and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.


Why not just use the basic recipe that came with your KA mixer - the one
that I suggested?


God knows where it is at this point.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:57 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

"Priscilla Ballou" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in

the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make

and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.


Why not just use the basic recipe that came with your KA mixer - the one
that I suggested?


God knows where it is at this point.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 08:12 PM
Marcella Peek
 
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In article ,
Priscilla Ballou wrote:

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla


Here's a good recipe that we like. It's pretty straightforward. You
can make it into 2 loaves or 24 rolls or some of each. I got the recipe
from my ex-husbands grandma.

Mom's White Bread

2 C warm water
1/4 C sugar
3/4 t salt
1 pkg yeast
1/4 C vegetable oil
6 C all purpose flour

Mix water, sugar, salt, yeast, oil and 4 C flour until fairly smooth.
Let rise 10 minutes. Mix in up to 2 C flour. This should make a fairly
stiff dough. Let rise until doubled. Punch down and let rest for 10
minutes. Shape into two loaves or 24 rolls. Let rise in greased pans
until doubled. Bake loaves at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, rolls will
take less time.

marcella
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 08:12 PM
Marcella Peek
 
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In article ,
Priscilla Ballou wrote:

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla


Here's a good recipe that we like. It's pretty straightforward. You
can make it into 2 loaves or 24 rolls or some of each. I got the recipe
from my ex-husbands grandma.

Mom's White Bread

2 C warm water
1/4 C sugar
3/4 t salt
1 pkg yeast
1/4 C vegetable oil
6 C all purpose flour

Mix water, sugar, salt, yeast, oil and 4 C flour until fairly smooth.
Let rise 10 minutes. Mix in up to 2 C flour. This should make a fairly
stiff dough. Let rise until doubled. Punch down and let rest for 10
minutes. Shape into two loaves or 24 rolls. Let rise in greased pans
until doubled. Bake loaves at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, rolls will
take less time.

marcella
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 10:23 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Default

In article ,
Marcella Peek wrote:

In article ,
Priscilla Ballou wrote:

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla


Here's a good recipe that we like. It's pretty straightforward. You
can make it into 2 loaves or 24 rolls or some of each. I got the recipe
from my ex-husbands grandma.

Mom's White Bread

2 C warm water
1/4 C sugar
3/4 t salt
1 pkg yeast
1/4 C vegetable oil
6 C all purpose flour

Mix water, sugar, salt, yeast, oil and 4 C flour until fairly smooth.
Let rise 10 minutes. Mix in up to 2 C flour. This should make a fairly
stiff dough. Let rise until doubled. Punch down and let rest for 10
minutes. Shape into two loaves or 24 rolls. Let rise in greased pans
until doubled. Bake loaves at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, rolls will
take less time.


Thanks, but.... no kneading? And how much yeast is in a package? I buy
it by the bag.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 10:23 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Default

In article ,
Marcella Peek wrote:

In article ,
Priscilla Ballou wrote:

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla


Here's a good recipe that we like. It's pretty straightforward. You
can make it into 2 loaves or 24 rolls or some of each. I got the recipe
from my ex-husbands grandma.

Mom's White Bread

2 C warm water
1/4 C sugar
3/4 t salt
1 pkg yeast
1/4 C vegetable oil
6 C all purpose flour

Mix water, sugar, salt, yeast, oil and 4 C flour until fairly smooth.
Let rise 10 minutes. Mix in up to 2 C flour. This should make a fairly
stiff dough. Let rise until doubled. Punch down and let rest for 10
minutes. Shape into two loaves or 24 rolls. Let rise in greased pans
until doubled. Bake loaves at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, rolls will
take less time.


Thanks, but.... no kneading? And how much yeast is in a package? I buy
it by the bag.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 11:49 PM
GMAN
 
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In article , Kenneth wrote:
On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 22:15:40 GMT, "Thomas H. O'Reilly"
wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


Howdy,

Bread is not at its best when it is still hot from the oven.
(In fact, in France, it is not legal to sell such.)


Or to own deoderant

It is at its best after it has cooled (and is then re-heated
if one wants it warm.) When still hot from the oven, it has
all sorts of off tastes from by-products that will evaporate
as it cools.

All the best,


San Francisco sour dough bread is best eaten warm from the oven.
  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 11:49 PM
GMAN
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Kenneth wrote:
On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 22:15:40 GMT, "Thomas H. O'Reilly"
wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


Howdy,

Bread is not at its best when it is still hot from the oven.
(In fact, in France, it is not legal to sell such.)


Or to own deoderant

It is at its best after it has cooled (and is then re-heated
if one wants it warm.) When still hot from the oven, it has
all sorts of off tastes from by-products that will evaporate
as it cools.

All the best,


San Francisco sour dough bread is best eaten warm from the oven.
  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-04-2005, 07:17 AM
RsH
 
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Default

The typical packet of yeast is 8 grams to 8.25 grams of yeast.

RsH

On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 21:23:29 GMT, Priscilla Ballou
wrote:

Thanks, but.... no kneading? And how much yeast is in a package? I buy
it by the bag.


================================================== =====

Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's...
If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-04-2005, 07:17 AM
RsH
 
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Default

The typical packet of yeast is 8 grams to 8.25 grams of yeast.

RsH

On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 21:23:29 GMT, Priscilla Ballou
wrote:

Thanks, but.... no kneading? And how much yeast is in a package? I buy
it by the bag.


================================================== =====

Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's...
If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-04-2005, 12:50 PM
Ian & Hilda Dedic
 
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Default

Priscilla Ballou wrote:
Thanks for your response, Roy. Emma's my niece, not my daughter, but I
just translated those sentences to match. ;-)

This first bread baking will be with Emma assisting and observing. More
active participation will be as she wants. I'd given her the options of
cookies or bread for this weekend, and she said bread because she'd made
cookies before. "I've never baked bread before," she warned, and I
assured her that I wasn't relying on her for expertise, I was simply
offering a chance for her to learn how to do it. That met with firm
approval. I generally offer and accept what she chooses. I have some
really good goop for burns, just in case. Her mother is the
over-protective one. I'm more of the "the kid's going to have to learn,
and I'll inform her and then be there for her when it hurts" school.

The recipe matters because I NEED A RECIPE, but I guess I'll go to Joy
of Cooking. ;-)

Priscilla


my daughter Sarah aged 10 and a half has taken to
baking cheese bread plaits all by herself! by hand, from scratch here's
her recipe, sorry if it's a bit late.

They turn out very well and she likes the braiding bit, but not the
waiting...

Hilda

White Cheese Bread Plaits

Ingredients:

675g white flour
450ml lukewarm water
2 tea spoons salt
2 tea spoons yeast
1 table spoon sunflower oil
1/2 cup grated cheese


Method:

1.Measure out flour into a bowl.
2.Add salt and mix thoroughly.
3.Add yeast, stir and make a wide, deep well in the middle.
4.Pour water and sunflower oil into the well, gradually drawing in the
flour from the sides until it is smooth and elastic.
5.Add cheese and mix until it is hard to tell the difference between the
dough and cheese.
6.Knead the dough to bind the ingredients together properly.
7.Split the dough into three lumps and put two aside.
8.Split this lump into three and roll each ball into a sausage shape.
9.Lay the three rolls beside each other, carefully plait them and
squeeze the ends to keep it together.
10.Repeat this shaping process on the other two balls.
11.Once you have made the three plaits, lay them on a tray over a gentle
heat and leave them to prove for 40 minutes.
12.After proving, the plaits should have almost doubled in size.
13.Put the plaits in an oven at 220 degrees celsius for 35-40 minutes or
until well risen. You may need to bake for a shorter time depending on
your oven)

(Our fan oven only takes about 20 minutes I suggest you keep an eye on
the loaves to prevent burning

14.Leave the bread to cool for about 10 minutes, cut it open and enjoy!


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