Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 02:06 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ping: Eric Jorgensen - fribrament

You said: "Just placed my order for a 15"x20" Fibrament-D stone."

Did you receive your stone yet?
I was looking at the picture of it at
http://www.bakingstone.com/why_fibrament.php
and it looks to me that it is not flat all the way across, but has what
looks to be about 2-3" flaps on either side; if this is true, I am wondering
why they decided to use up the space so it could angle upwards.
Thanks,
Dee



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 02:24 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:06:30 -0400
"Dee Randall" wrote:

You said: "Just placed my order for a 15"x20" Fibrament-D stone."

Did you receive your stone yet?
I was looking at the picture of it at
http://www.bakingstone.com/why_fibrament.php
and it looks to me that it is not flat all the way across, but has what
looks to be about 2-3" flaps on either side; if this is true, I am
wondering why they decided to use up the space so it could angle
upwards. Thanks,
Dee




Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.

When you pour cement into a mold that has vertical sides, there's a
higher risk of air bubble defects along the molded edge than with sloped
sides.

These defects would hardly detract from the usefulness of the stone, but
some people might object to them, which would increase product returns.

It's also much easier to remove from the mold when the sides are sloped,
and this lowers the defect rate as well.

The entire sloped area on my 15x20 stone is about 1". It's not a big
deal. I agree that at the angle they shot the picture, it looks bigger than
that, because of the curved corners. The corners on mine aren't curved.

I didn't get any fancy box, though, just lots of bubble wrap

As for it's performance, that's bloody great. See:

http://tinyurl.com/3ussm (google groups url way too long)

So far I've done four pizze and half a dozen calzone. I mean to try a
loaf of bread soon.

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 02:24 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:06:30 -0400
"Dee Randall" wrote:

You said: "Just placed my order for a 15"x20" Fibrament-D stone."

Did you receive your stone yet?
I was looking at the picture of it at
http://www.bakingstone.com/why_fibrament.php
and it looks to me that it is not flat all the way across, but has what
looks to be about 2-3" flaps on either side; if this is true, I am
wondering why they decided to use up the space so it could angle
upwards. Thanks,
Dee




Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.

When you pour cement into a mold that has vertical sides, there's a
higher risk of air bubble defects along the molded edge than with sloped
sides.

These defects would hardly detract from the usefulness of the stone, but
some people might object to them, which would increase product returns.

It's also much easier to remove from the mold when the sides are sloped,
and this lowers the defect rate as well.

The entire sloped area on my 15x20 stone is about 1". It's not a big
deal. I agree that at the angle they shot the picture, it looks bigger than
that, because of the curved corners. The corners on mine aren't curved.

I didn't get any fancy box, though, just lots of bubble wrap

As for it's performance, that's bloody great. See:

http://tinyurl.com/3ussm (google groups url way too long)

So far I've done four pizze and half a dozen calzone. I mean to try a
loaf of bread soon.

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 02:49 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:06:30 -0400
"Dee Randall" wrote:

You said: "Just placed my order for a 15"x20" Fibrament-D stone."

Did you receive your stone yet?
I was looking at the picture of it at
http://www.bakingstone.com/why_fibrament.php
and it looks to me that it is not flat all the way across, but has what
looks to be about 2-3" flaps on either side; if this is true, I am
wondering why they decided to use up the space so it could angle
upwards. Thanks,
Dee




Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.

When you pour cement into a mold that has vertical sides, there's a
higher risk of air bubble defects along the molded edge than with sloped
sides.

These defects would hardly detract from the usefulness of the stone, but
some people might object to them, which would increase product returns.

It's also much easier to remove from the mold when the sides are sloped,
and this lowers the defect rate as well.

The entire sloped area on my 15x20 stone is about 1". It's not a big
deal. I agree that at the angle they shot the picture, it looks bigger
than
that, because of the curved corners. The corners on mine aren't curved.

I didn't get any fancy box, though, just lots of bubble wrap

As for it's performance, that's bloody great. See:

http://tinyurl.com/3ussm (google groups url way too long)

So far I've done four pizze and half a dozen calzone. I mean to try a
loaf of bread soon.


Thanks for your reply. It made me 'finally' make my purchase. I had been
set on the "Pizza Gourmet" stone which I have been using for many years and
has given me very good service, but I couldn't find it.
I found a stone rated best by America's Test Kitchen.
http://planetdelicious.com/products.php?product=PZ-15SQ
It was $28.95 + 7.25 (I think) shipping. Not a bad price if it's OK.
I'll let you know what it's like when I get it, and if there's a brand on
it -- hope I don't get bit!
Dee


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 02:49 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 21:06:30 -0400
"Dee Randall" wrote:

You said: "Just placed my order for a 15"x20" Fibrament-D stone."

Did you receive your stone yet?
I was looking at the picture of it at
http://www.bakingstone.com/why_fibrament.php
and it looks to me that it is not flat all the way across, but has what
looks to be about 2-3" flaps on either side; if this is true, I am
wondering why they decided to use up the space so it could angle
upwards. Thanks,
Dee




Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.

When you pour cement into a mold that has vertical sides, there's a
higher risk of air bubble defects along the molded edge than with sloped
sides.

These defects would hardly detract from the usefulness of the stone, but
some people might object to them, which would increase product returns.

It's also much easier to remove from the mold when the sides are sloped,
and this lowers the defect rate as well.

The entire sloped area on my 15x20 stone is about 1". It's not a big
deal. I agree that at the angle they shot the picture, it looks bigger
than
that, because of the curved corners. The corners on mine aren't curved.

I didn't get any fancy box, though, just lots of bubble wrap

As for it's performance, that's bloody great. See:

http://tinyurl.com/3ussm (google groups url way too long)

So far I've done four pizze and half a dozen calzone. I mean to try a
loaf of bread soon.


Thanks for your reply. It made me 'finally' make my purchase. I had been
set on the "Pizza Gourmet" stone which I have been using for many years and
has given me very good service, but I couldn't find it.
I found a stone rated best by America's Test Kitchen.
http://planetdelicious.com/products.php?product=PZ-15SQ
It was $28.95 + 7.25 (I think) shipping. Not a bad price if it's OK.
I'll let you know what it's like when I get it, and if there's a brand on
it -- hope I don't get bit!
Dee




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:57 PM
RedBear
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 19:24:31 -0600, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:



Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.



On the FAQ page of the web-site they show a loaf of bread on a stone
with the stone positioned wide-side up
(http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php). Which way are you positioning
the stone? If wide-side down, is there a reason?
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 08:15 PM
Eric Jorgensen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 13:57:15 -0400
RedBear wrote:

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 19:24:31 -0600, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:



Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.



On the FAQ page of the web-site they show a loaf of bread on a stone
with the stone positioned wide-side up
(http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php). Which way are you positioning
the stone? If wide-side down, is there a reason?



Yeah, nearly all of their photos, and their logo, show it narrow side
up.

The sheet of paper that comes with it has the same logo in the
letterhead, narrow side up, and then at the bottom has a diagram indicating
that it should be used wide side up.

I used to think ill of these kinds of aesthetic mistakes, until one of
my friends pointed out that engineering oriented companies are too busy
getting the work done to fuss with the marketing. Still curious, though.

A better question is why their pizza artwork usually shows a pan pizza.
I have one of those pans, I've used it successfully, and find i like pizza
off the stone better.

The wide side has some texture, a subtle rise and fall to the surface,
probably due to the cement being drizzled in and not entirely smoothed out.

A less even cooking surface probably improves the escape of water vapor
during baking, or something.

If you search through google groups, I could swear that Hans Kuntze
(who's a far better and more experienced baker than i) explained it to
someone in the last 12-18 months.

You could always drop the inventor an email, too. his address is on the
website.

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 08:15 PM
Eric Jorgensen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 13:57:15 -0400
RedBear wrote:

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 19:24:31 -0600, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:



Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.



On the FAQ page of the web-site they show a loaf of bread on a stone
with the stone positioned wide-side up
(http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php). Which way are you positioning
the stone? If wide-side down, is there a reason?



Yeah, nearly all of their photos, and their logo, show it narrow side
up.

The sheet of paper that comes with it has the same logo in the
letterhead, narrow side up, and then at the bottom has a diagram indicating
that it should be used wide side up.

I used to think ill of these kinds of aesthetic mistakes, until one of
my friends pointed out that engineering oriented companies are too busy
getting the work done to fuss with the marketing. Still curious, though.

A better question is why their pizza artwork usually shows a pan pizza.
I have one of those pans, I've used it successfully, and find i like pizza
off the stone better.

The wide side has some texture, a subtle rise and fall to the surface,
probably due to the cement being drizzled in and not entirely smoothed out.

A less even cooking surface probably improves the escape of water vapor
during baking, or something.

If you search through google groups, I could swear that Hans Kuntze
(who's a far better and more experienced baker than i) explained it to
someone in the last 12-18 months.

You could always drop the inventor an email, too. his address is on the
website.

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 08:15 PM
Eric Jorgensen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 13:57:15 -0400
RedBear wrote:

On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 19:24:31 -0600, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:



Yeah, it's tapered at the edge.



On the FAQ page of the web-site they show a loaf of bread on a stone
with the stone positioned wide-side up
(http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php). Which way are you positioning
the stone? If wide-side down, is there a reason?



Yeah, nearly all of their photos, and their logo, show it narrow side
up.

The sheet of paper that comes with it has the same logo in the
letterhead, narrow side up, and then at the bottom has a diagram indicating
that it should be used wide side up.

I used to think ill of these kinds of aesthetic mistakes, until one of
my friends pointed out that engineering oriented companies are too busy
getting the work done to fuss with the marketing. Still curious, though.

A better question is why their pizza artwork usually shows a pan pizza.
I have one of those pans, I've used it successfully, and find i like pizza
off the stone better.

The wide side has some texture, a subtle rise and fall to the surface,
probably due to the cement being drizzled in and not entirely smoothed out.

A less even cooking surface probably improves the escape of water vapor
during baking, or something.

If you search through google groups, I could swear that Hans Kuntze
(who's a far better and more experienced baker than i) explained it to
someone in the last 12-18 months.

You could always drop the inventor an email, too. his address is on the
website.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Excellent advice from Eric Asimov DaleW Wine 7 12-04-2007 03:44 AM
NYT: Eric Asimov does Pinot Grigio Mark Lipton Wine 1 23-08-2006 06:10 PM
Ping: Eric Jorgensen - fribrament Dee Randall Baking 0 07-04-2005 02:06 AM
Apropos a Eric Solomon jcoulter Wine 2 03-03-2005 05:58 PM
Apropos a Eric Solomon jcoulter Wine 0 03-03-2005 01:19 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:05 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017