Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 04-04-2005, 08:29 AM
The Old Bear
 
Posts: n/a
Default any opinions on "dual fuel" ranges


We're continuing to shop for a new range. I have a personal
preference for natural gas fueled ranges and ovens but I
notice that a number of manufacturers are now making "dual
fuel" ranges with gas burners and electric convection ovens.

Is there any meaningful advantage to this?

I understand that natural gas produces water vapor (and
carbon dioxide) when it burns and that this makes the
humidity in gas ovens higher than in their electric
counterparts. I would assume that this affects the baking
process for better or worse. What has been your experience?

I could post this to the appliance newsgroup, but I'd
rather have the opinions of people who actually bake
and not just technical theory of one versus the other type
of oven.

Thanks.

Sincerely,
Will
The Old Bear


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Old 04-04-2005, 05:47 PM
Roy
 
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Default


IMO I still prefer the gas fired range( stove tops and oven).
BTW, I am not a fan of the convection oven whether home or
institutional
But I prefer electric oven for professional use as its loaded with
more accurate measuring devices i.e temperature control, heat setting
for (bottom, middle and top heat) ,efficient timer and easier to clean
and safer to use ....Besides there is a built in steam generator in
such institutional type of oven
If those stuff I mentioned is present in the home electric oven I
would prefer electrics also and I will have no problem with dual
operation as well for the same reason.

BTW, check to it that the range that you buy does not have a leaky
oven( allowing steam to be just vented out in leaks and holes) as that
is the common problem with home ovens.
Roy



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Old 04-04-2005, 05:47 PM
Roy
 
Posts: n/a
Default


IMO I still prefer the gas fired range( stove tops and oven).
BTW, I am not a fan of the convection oven whether home or
institutional
But I prefer electric oven for professional use as its loaded with
more accurate measuring devices i.e temperature control, heat setting
for (bottom, middle and top heat) ,efficient timer and easier to clean
and safer to use ....Besides there is a built in steam generator in
such institutional type of oven
If those stuff I mentioned is present in the home electric oven I
would prefer electrics also and I will have no problem with dual
operation as well for the same reason.

BTW, check to it that the range that you buy does not have a leaky
oven( allowing steam to be just vented out in leaks and holes) as that
is the common problem with home ovens.
Roy

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 08:43 AM
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Loki wrote on 06 Apr 2005 in rec.food.baking

il Mon, 4 Apr 2005 02:29:30 -0500,
(The Old Bear) ha scritto:


We're continuing to shop for a new range. I have a personal
preference for natural gas fueled ranges and ovens but I
notice that a number of manufacturers are now making "dual
fuel" ranges with gas burners and electric convection ovens.

Is there any meaningful advantage to this?

I understand that natural gas produces water vapor (and
carbon dioxide) when it burns and that this makes the
humidity in gas ovens higher than in their electric
counterparts. I would assume that this affects the baking
process for better or worse. What has been your experience?

I could post this to the appliance newsgroup, but I'd
rather have the opinions of people who actually bake
and not just technical theory of one versus the other type
of oven.


Perhaps it's harder to kill yourself with an an electric oven, than
it is with a gas oven. Singed eyebrows would be a faint memory too.
Perhaps thermostats work better in electric ovens. It could be a case
of using what's best for each application. Dry heat for baking, gas
for that easy control of heat on the stove stop. I've also never been
too keen on the idea of all the combustion materials floating around
an oven tainting the food. It may not be a problem but it's my
perception.


The advantage of a gas stove top are instant on and immediate temp
control by adjusting the flame. The advantages of an electric oven are
a more readily constant oven temp and fewer hot spots.

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic Since Aug 2004
1AC- 7.2, 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
Weight from 265 down to 219 lbs. and dropping.
Continuing to be Manitoban
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-04-2005, 08:43 AM
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Loki wrote on 06 Apr 2005 in rec.food.baking

il Mon, 4 Apr 2005 02:29:30 -0500,
(The Old Bear) ha scritto:


We're continuing to shop for a new range. I have a personal
preference for natural gas fueled ranges and ovens but I
notice that a number of manufacturers are now making "dual
fuel" ranges with gas burners and electric convection ovens.

Is there any meaningful advantage to this?

I understand that natural gas produces water vapor (and
carbon dioxide) when it burns and that this makes the
humidity in gas ovens higher than in their electric
counterparts. I would assume that this affects the baking
process for better or worse. What has been your experience?

I could post this to the appliance newsgroup, but I'd
rather have the opinions of people who actually bake
and not just technical theory of one versus the other type
of oven.


Perhaps it's harder to kill yourself with an an electric oven, than
it is with a gas oven. Singed eyebrows would be a faint memory too.
Perhaps thermostats work better in electric ovens. It could be a case
of using what's best for each application. Dry heat for baking, gas
for that easy control of heat on the stove stop. I've also never been
too keen on the idea of all the combustion materials floating around
an oven tainting the food. It may not be a problem but it's my
perception.


The advantage of a gas stove top are instant on and immediate temp
control by adjusting the flame. The advantages of an electric oven are
a more readily constant oven temp and fewer hot spots.

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic Since Aug 2004
1AC- 7.2, 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
Weight from 265 down to 219 lbs. and dropping.
Continuing to be Manitoban


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 04:23 AM
The Old Bear
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks to everyone who responded to my question about dual fuel ranges and
to my earlier question about ranges in general.

We ended up buying a 36" Thermador all-gas range with four burners and a
grill. http://www.thermador.com/product.cfm?product_id=208

Although there were many favorable comments about electric ovens and
temperature control, in my own past experiences with gas ovens -- or at
least with gas ovens with well-designed thermostatic controls -- I have
never found temperature control to be a particular problem.

I found Roy Basan's comments useful (as his comments frequently are),
especially his observations about the control systems on commercial
electric ovens. This makes a lot of sense to me and reconciles my
past mediocre experiences with residential electric ovens with the
positive comments many people make about them.

I'll try to remember to post something about our decision to go with
the Thermador in about six months when I've had some time to live
with the range and learn its strenghts and weaknesses.

Again, my sincere thanks to all.

Cheers,
Will
The Old Bear

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 04:23 AM
The Old Bear
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks to everyone who responded to my question about dual fuel ranges and
to my earlier question about ranges in general.

We ended up buying a 36" Thermador all-gas range with four burners and a
grill. http://www.thermador.com/product.cfm?product_id=208

Although there were many favorable comments about electric ovens and
temperature control, in my own past experiences with gas ovens -- or at
least with gas ovens with well-designed thermostatic controls -- I have
never found temperature control to be a particular problem.

I found Roy Basan's comments useful (as his comments frequently are),
especially his observations about the control systems on commercial
electric ovens. This makes a lot of sense to me and reconciles my
past mediocre experiences with residential electric ovens with the
positive comments many people make about them.

I'll try to remember to post something about our decision to go with
the Thermador in about six months when I've had some time to live
with the range and learn its strenghts and weaknesses.

Again, my sincere thanks to all.

Cheers,
Will
The Old Bear

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-04-2005, 06:28 AM
dug88
 
Posts: n/a
Default

i read the previous (date code) replies.
agree can use a gas top elements and i would be in utopia.
especially if it has a grill for barbeque.

i have about 3 friends who have full gas stoves, but they use a ktel
convection oven.
the food tastes better from the convection oven, especially chicken,
sausage,pot roast. and the clean up is easy.
i have not got one yet, but i know i will have to get one.

doug

"Monsur Fromage du Pollet" wrote in message
...
Loki wrote on 06 Apr 2005 in rec.food.baking

il Mon, 4 Apr 2005 02:29:30 -0500,
(The Old Bear) ha scritto:


We're continuing to shop for a new range. I have a personal
preference for natural gas fueled ranges and ovens but I
notice that a number of manufacturers are now making "dual
fuel" ranges with gas burners and electric convection ovens.

Is there any meaningful advantage to this?

I understand that natural gas produces water vapor (and
carbon dioxide) when it burns and that this makes the
humidity in gas ovens higher than in their electric
counterparts. I would assume that this affects the baking
process for better or worse. What has been your experience?

I could post this to the appliance newsgroup, but I'd
rather have the opinions of people who actually bake
and not just technical theory of one versus the other type
of oven.


Perhaps it's harder to kill yourself with an an electric oven, than
it is with a gas oven. Singed eyebrows would be a faint memory too.
Perhaps thermostats work better in electric ovens. It could be a case
of using what's best for each application. Dry heat for baking, gas
for that easy control of heat on the stove stop. I've also never been
too keen on the idea of all the combustion materials floating around
an oven tainting the food. It may not be a problem but it's my
perception.


The advantage of a gas stove top are instant on and immediate temp
control by adjusting the flame. The advantages of an electric oven are
a more readily constant oven temp and fewer hot spots.

--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic Since Aug 2004
1AC- 7.2, 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
Weight from 265 down to 219 lbs. and dropping.
Continuing to be Manitoban





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