Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2005, 08:13 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 12:42:33 -0400, Terrel
wrote:

"AK" wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan. When
I'm making a bundt cake, or using any kind of a pan with
grooves/fluting, I use a pastry brush to grease the pan. The pastry
brush makes it easier to get the shortening into all the grooves in
the pan. I also use the pastry brush to help spread the flour into the
grooves.

Terrel


I spray it on with Pam or some generic equivalent, toss in a tbsp or
so of flour, and turn the pan, while holding it over the sink, to get
the flour into the grooves. One less thing to wash. No need to tip
the oil jug at all.

Today I baked 6 loaves of bread ( 4 of Carol Field's cocodrillo and 2
rye from "Bread Alone"), put up 2 quarts of strawberry jam and made2
batches of chocolate chip cookies. The kitchen needs a good cleaning,
but I am happy. Anything that saves a step or the cleaning of an
implement here and there is always a godsend.

Boron

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2005, 08:13 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 12:42:33 -0400, Terrel
wrote:

"AK" wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan. When
I'm making a bundt cake, or using any kind of a pan with
grooves/fluting, I use a pastry brush to grease the pan. The pastry
brush makes it easier to get the shortening into all the grooves in
the pan. I also use the pastry brush to help spread the flour into the
grooves.

Terrel


I spray it on with Pam or some generic equivalent, toss in a tbsp or
so of flour, and turn the pan, while holding it over the sink, to get
the flour into the grooves. One less thing to wash. No need to tip
the oil jug at all.

Today I baked 6 loaves of bread ( 4 of Carol Field's cocodrillo and 2
rye from "Bread Alone"), put up 2 quarts of strawberry jam and made2
batches of chocolate chip cookies. The kitchen needs a good cleaning,
but I am happy. Anything that saves a step or the cleaning of an
implement here and there is always a godsend.

Boron
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2005, 10:08 PM
Ida Slapter
 
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 12:42:33 -0400, Terrel
wrote:

A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan


When baking a chocolate cake, I dust the pan with cocoa.

When getting ready to frost a layer, I turn it upside down so I have a
perfectly flat "top". Makes for a nicer presentation.


The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.
Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures may not
be consistent with what you know to be true.
As with any recipe, you may find your personal
intervention will be necessary. Bon Appetit!
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2005, 10:08 PM
Ida Slapter
 
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 12:42:33 -0400, Terrel
wrote:

A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan


When baking a chocolate cake, I dust the pan with cocoa.

When getting ready to frost a layer, I turn it upside down so I have a
perfectly flat "top". Makes for a nicer presentation.


The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.
Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures may not
be consistent with what you know to be true.
As with any recipe, you may find your personal
intervention will be necessary. Bon Appetit!
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2005, 10:09 PM
Ida Slapter
 
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 15:13:14 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

I spray it on with Pam or some generic equivalent,


I always open the dishwasher up and put the pan on the door....then
spray. Don't have that mess to clean up from overspray.


We Will Drink NO Wine
before It's Time.

................it's time.


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 03:50 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Terrel" wrote in message
...
"AK" wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan. When
I'm making a bundt cake, or using any kind of a pan with
grooves/fluting, I use a pastry brush to grease the pan. The pastry
brush makes it easier to get the shortening into all the grooves in
the pan. I also use the pastry brush to help spread the flour into the
grooves.

Terrel


If you want a little extra chocolate in your cake, instead of flouring the
pan, sprinkle cocoa.
I also use a clean pastry brush to brush off the flour all over my
KitchenAid mixer stand, which invariable is covered with flour -- easier and
less work than washing it off.
Also, soak any bowl you've mixed flour in in cold water instead of hot
water -- it will come out easier.
Dee


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 03:50 AM
Dee Randall
 
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"Terrel" wrote in message
...
"AK" wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


A lot of baking recipes call for greasing and flouring the pan. When
I'm making a bundt cake, or using any kind of a pan with
grooves/fluting, I use a pastry brush to grease the pan. The pastry
brush makes it easier to get the shortening into all the grooves in
the pan. I also use the pastry brush to help spread the flour into the
grooves.

Terrel


If you want a little extra chocolate in your cake, instead of flouring the
pan, sprinkle cocoa.
I also use a clean pastry brush to brush off the flour all over my
KitchenAid mixer stand, which invariable is covered with flour -- easier and
less work than washing it off.
Also, soak any bowl you've mixed flour in in cold water instead of hot
water -- it will come out easier.
Dee


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:01 PM
.
 
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Default

On Sat, 2 Apr 2005, AK wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


Read the entire recipe before you begin. Measure out everything and have
it ready. Many recipes involve timing. Letting something sit while you
measure out other ingredients could ruin the results.

If you need refridgerated items at room temperature (e.g. eggs and butter)
put them out first so you are not waiting for them.

If you need your butter at room temperature and cut into small pieces, cut
it when it is really cold then let it warm up. Don't let it warm up then
attempt to cut it.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:01 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 2 Apr 2005, AK wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


Read the entire recipe before you begin. Measure out everything and have
it ready. Many recipes involve timing. Letting something sit while you
measure out other ingredients could ruin the results.

If you need refridgerated items at room temperature (e.g. eggs and butter)
put them out first so you are not waiting for them.

If you need your butter at room temperature and cut into small pieces, cut
it when it is really cold then let it warm up. Don't let it warm up then
attempt to cut it.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:01 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 2 Apr 2005, AK wrote:

I'd like to know some baking tips from those who love baking and are
willing to share their tips! Thanx alot


Read the entire recipe before you begin. Measure out everything and have
it ready. Many recipes involve timing. Letting something sit while you
measure out other ingredients could ruin the results.

If you need refridgerated items at room temperature (e.g. eggs and butter)
put them out first so you are not waiting for them.

If you need your butter at room temperature and cut into small pieces, cut
it when it is really cold then let it warm up. Don't let it warm up then
attempt to cut it.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:07 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Eric Jorgensen wrote:

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 11:06:05 -0400
"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote:

"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
I would be remiss in my duties as a responsible netizen if i allowed
someone taking an internet course to believe that they can schlep
around like that without getting flamed a few times.


And just what harm does it do to help her??? Are you the official
"flamer"?


People have been coming to usenet to ask others to do their homework
for as long as there has been usenet.

And other people have been telling those people to get stuffed for
just as long.

If nobody fulfilled the 2nd part, that would mean that the internet
had devolved thoroughly into a monkey house and not just mostly.


There is another option. You could just ignore people asking you to do
their homework for them.

By the way, I learned a new tip today. If the original poster didn't ask
this question I might not have learned something. Their motive might have
been wrong but it benefits me so I'm okay with it.

P.S. I just thought of another tip: If you are mixing something that
spatters, put the bowl in the sink and mix it there. Easier clean up.
Additionally, folder a tea towel and place it under the bowl so it doesn't
vibrate in the sink.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:07 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Eric Jorgensen wrote:

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 11:06:05 -0400
"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote:

"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
I would be remiss in my duties as a responsible netizen if i allowed
someone taking an internet course to believe that they can schlep
around like that without getting flamed a few times.


And just what harm does it do to help her??? Are you the official
"flamer"?


People have been coming to usenet to ask others to do their homework
for as long as there has been usenet.

And other people have been telling those people to get stuffed for
just as long.

If nobody fulfilled the 2nd part, that would mean that the internet
had devolved thoroughly into a monkey house and not just mostly.


There is another option. You could just ignore people asking you to do
their homework for them.

By the way, I learned a new tip today. If the original poster didn't ask
this question I might not have learned something. Their motive might have
been wrong but it benefits me so I'm okay with it.

P.S. I just thought of another tip: If you are mixing something that
spatters, put the bowl in the sink and mix it there. Easier clean up.
Additionally, folder a tea towel and place it under the bowl so it doesn't
vibrate in the sink.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:07 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Eric Jorgensen wrote:

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 11:06:05 -0400
"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote:

"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
I would be remiss in my duties as a responsible netizen if i allowed
someone taking an internet course to believe that they can schlep
around like that without getting flamed a few times.


And just what harm does it do to help her??? Are you the official
"flamer"?


People have been coming to usenet to ask others to do their homework
for as long as there has been usenet.

And other people have been telling those people to get stuffed for
just as long.

If nobody fulfilled the 2nd part, that would mean that the internet
had devolved thoroughly into a monkey house and not just mostly.


There is another option. You could just ignore people asking you to do
their homework for them.

By the way, I learned a new tip today. If the original poster didn't ask
this question I might not have learned something. Their motive might have
been wrong but it benefits me so I'm okay with it.

P.S. I just thought of another tip: If you are mixing something that
spatters, put the bowl in the sink and mix it there. Easier clean up.
Additionally, folder a tea towel and place it under the bowl so it doesn't
vibrate in the sink.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:09 PM
.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Ida Slapter wrote:

On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 15:13:14 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

I spray it on with Pam or some generic equivalent,


I always open the dishwasher up and put the pan on the door....then
spray. Don't have that mess to clean up from overspray.


Excellent tip. I grew up in a house without a dishwasher so I'd never
thought of this. Now that I have my own place (and a dishwater) I'll have
to start doing this.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-04-2005, 05:25 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon 04 Apr 2005 09:07:28a, "." wrote in rec.food.baking:

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Eric Jorgensen wrote:

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 11:06:05 -0400
"MOMPEAGRAM" wrote:

"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
I would be remiss in my duties as a responsible netizen if i
allowed
someone taking an internet course to believe that they can schlep
around like that without getting flamed a few times.

And just what harm does it do to help her??? Are you the official
"flamer"?


People have been coming to usenet to ask others to do their homework
for as long as there has been usenet.

And other people have been telling those people to get stuffed for
just as long.

If nobody fulfilled the 2nd part, that would mean that the internet
had devolved thoroughly into a monkey house and not just mostly.


There is another option. You could just ignore people asking you to do
their homework for them.

By the way, I learned a new tip today. If the original poster didn't ask
this question I might not have learned something. Their motive might
have been wrong but it benefits me so I'm okay with it.

P.S. I just thought of another tip: If you are mixing something that
spatters, put the bowl in the sink and mix it there. Easier clean up.
Additionally, folder a tea towel and place it under the bowl so it
doesn't vibrate in the sink.


Another way, especially for whipping cream, is taking a double thickness
of waxed paper larger than the top of the mixing bowl, poking a hole
through the middle with the beaters, then inserting the beaters into the
motor. This makes a nice splash shield.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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