Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 29-03-2005, 10:51 AM
Selma Jane
 
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Default Meat Loaf in oven or on stove top

Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane

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Old 29-03-2005, 01:45 PM
Doug Kanter
 
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"Selma Jane" wrote in message
...
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


Why? This sounds like a question posted a couple of weeks ago, about making
french fries on the BBQ. Experimentation is good, but I think that in this
case, the time would be better spent at the library, browsing cookbooks
you've never met.


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Old 29-03-2005, 03:14 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default

Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill


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Old 29-03-2005, 03:14 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default

Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill


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Old 29-03-2005, 03:14 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default

Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill




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Old 29-03-2005, 03:23 PM
joeD
 
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Default

This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of bread
crumbs?

"jmcquown" wrote in message
. ..
Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill




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Old 29-03-2005, 03:23 PM
joeD
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of bread
crumbs?

"jmcquown" wrote in message
. ..
Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill




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Old 29-03-2005, 03:53 PM
Doug Kanter
 
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Default

Depends on what you're making. I can see cherry saw dust going nicely with
venison or duck. Might be a bit strong for chicken, though. I'd use oak for
that.

"joeD" wrote in message
...
This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of
bread crumbs?

"jmcquown" wrote in message
. ..
Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill






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Old 29-03-2005, 03:53 PM
Doug Kanter
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Depends on what you're making. I can see cherry saw dust going nicely with
venison or duck. Might be a bit strong for chicken, though. I'd use oak for
that.

"joeD" wrote in message
...
This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of
bread crumbs?

"jmcquown" wrote in message
. ..
Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill






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Old 29-03-2005, 04:05 PM
Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default

In article , "joeD"
wrote:

This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of
bread crumbs?


Hmm. I seem to remember that some high-fiber breads used to contain
wood fiber. You're just skipping the flour. Try it, but not more than
about 2-3 tablespoons. I'd probably mix it with the meat rather than
soaking it with the milk and egg first. It might clump together and
start to form a board or something.
--
-Barb, http://www.jamlady.eboard.com Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.


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Old 29-03-2005, 04:05 PM
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "joeD"
wrote:

This is a little OT but is it wrong to use cherry saw dust instead of
bread crumbs?


Hmm. I seem to remember that some high-fiber breads used to contain
wood fiber. You're just skipping the flour. Try it, but not more than
about 2-3 tablespoons. I'd probably mix it with the meat rather than
soaking it with the milk and egg first. It might clump together and
start to form a board or something.
--
-Barb, http://www.jamlady.eboard.com Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
"I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2005, 04:07 PM
Mash
 
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Default

My mother used to make a recipe similar to this. I plan on giving this
newly found recipe a try later this week.

As to meat loaf falling apart, it's best to let the meat loaf rest a
few minutes before removing from the pan and cutting.

Mary
who used to post here as smile...

* Exported from MasterCook *

Top-Stove Meat Loaf

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Beef

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 1/2 pounds ground beef
1/2 cup dry bread crumbs -- fine
10 3/4 ounces tomato soup, condensed
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 egg -- slightly beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
dash pepper -- generous dash
1 tablespoon shortening
1/4 cup water
1/2 teaspoon prepared mustard -- processed cheese
2 slices American cheese

Mix thoroughly beef, crumbs, 1/4 cup soup, onion, egg and seasonings.
Shape firmly into 2 loaves; brown on both sides in skillet in
shortening (to turn loaves use a pancake turner). Cover; cook over low
heat 25 minutes. Spoon off fat. Stir in remaining soup, water, mustard.
Top loaves with cheese. Uncover; cook 10 minutes. Serves 4 to 6.

Oven Method: Mix and shape as above. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40
minutes. Spoon off fat. Pour remaining soup (omit water) mixed with
mustard on loaves; top with cheese. Bake until cheese melts. Serves 4
to 6.

Description:
"Campbell Soup"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
-

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 596 Calories; 46g Fat (69.9%
calories from fat); 30g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber;
163mg Cholesterol; 1167mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 4 Lean
Meat; 0 Vegetable; 7 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.


Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Old 29-03-2005, 06:49 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default


"Selma Jane" wrote in message
...
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?


I think of meat loaf as a dry roasted item. When you make a pot roast, on
the stove top or in the oven, it is braised. That it, you brown the meat,
add liquid, and slow cook it. The idea is to let the moist heat dissolved
the tough connective tissue and turn a less expensive, tough cut into
something tender and flavorful. Grinding the meat for meat loaf
accomplishes the tenderizing. Dry roasting something on the stove seems at
best inefficient and probably dangerous as it would require constant
attention.

I am aware of someone who cooks meat loaf in a pressure cooker. I find that
unappealing as it doesn't allow for any browning and probably yields a
ghastly gray lump of meat. Rather than making a meatloaf in liquid on the
stove top, I would probably just make meatballs - same thing, but you can
brown them first which makes them more attractive and more flavorful. Just
my opinion.


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Old 29-03-2005, 06:49 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Selma Jane" wrote in message
...
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?


I think of meat loaf as a dry roasted item. When you make a pot roast, on
the stove top or in the oven, it is braised. That it, you brown the meat,
add liquid, and slow cook it. The idea is to let the moist heat dissolved
the tough connective tissue and turn a less expensive, tough cut into
something tender and flavorful. Grinding the meat for meat loaf
accomplishes the tenderizing. Dry roasting something on the stove seems at
best inefficient and probably dangerous as it would require constant
attention.

I am aware of someone who cooks meat loaf in a pressure cooker. I find that
unappealing as it doesn't allow for any browning and probably yields a
ghastly gray lump of meat. Rather than making a meatloaf in liquid on the
stove top, I would probably just make meatballs - same thing, but you can
brown them first which makes them more attractive and more flavorful. Just
my opinion.


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Old 29-03-2005, 08:12 PM
Matt G
 
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Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in
:

I think of meat loaf as a dry roasted item.



I like it better with brown gravy.




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