Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2005, 08:47 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Matt G" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote in
:

I think of meat loaf as a dry roasted item.



I like it better with brown gravy.

You can make the gravy with the pan drippings





  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2005, 09:40 PM
Joseph Littleshoes
 
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Selma Jane wrote:

Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.

Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


"Salisbury steak" or "Danish meat patties" (recipe on request) can be
sautéed, fried, or cooked this way, though often times they are
"broiled" or baked. The sauté or fry method allows for the making of an
quick and easy & tasty sauce.

One time i was making meat loaf and half way through the process got
distracted, forgot what i was doing and went back to finish and made
hamburgers with the meat loaf mix, fried them up in a pan and served on
a toasted bun with lettuce, mayo, sliced red onion & tomato. Was very
good.
---
Joseph Littleshoes

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2005, 10:03 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Joseph Littleshoes" wrote in message
...
Selma Jane wrote:

Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.

Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


"Salisbury steak" or "Danish meat patties" (recipe on request) can be
sautéed, fried, or cooked this way, though often times they are
"broiled" or baked. The sauté or fry method allows for the making of an
quick and easy & tasty sauce.

One time i was making meat loaf and half way through the process got
distracted, forgot what i was doing and went back to finish and made
hamburgers with the meat loaf mix, fried them up in a pan and served on
a toasted bun with lettuce, mayo, sliced red onion & tomato. Was very
good.


I've seen that referred to as "hobo steak."


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-03-2005, 10:03 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Joseph Littleshoes" wrote in message
...
Selma Jane wrote:

Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.

Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


"Salisbury steak" or "Danish meat patties" (recipe on request) can be
sautéed, fried, or cooked this way, though often times they are
"broiled" or baked. The sauté or fry method allows for the making of an
quick and easy & tasty sauce.

One time i was making meat loaf and half way through the process got
distracted, forgot what i was doing and went back to finish and made
hamburgers with the meat loaf mix, fried them up in a pan and served on
a toasted bun with lettuce, mayo, sliced red onion & tomato. Was very
good.


I've seen that referred to as "hobo steak."


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:20 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 23:59:49 GMT
Dog3 wrote:

"jmcquown" wrote in
:

Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a
crock pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill




I'm afraid if I made it in a crock pot it would be glop. Never made it on

the stove either. I wonder how that would turn out.



The book that comes with a Crock Pot(tm) claims that you can cook
anything in it very well, even bread.

I say it's all just a crock. It's no more of a universal cooker than an
Amana Radar Range, which of course has cookbooks available that explain
how you can cook anything in it very well.

Every job has it's appropriate tools. You can make meatloaf on your
car's exaust manifold - that doesn't mean you should.

Most of this discussion seems to revolve around meatloaf baked inside a
pan - the other method is to use a pan to form it and then turn it out onto
a flat baking sheet that has a lip, and liberally apply a tomato-based
glaze. This allows the fat to run out and promotes crust formation.

You can use any heat source you like to cook your food. Some will
provide better results than others for some foods. I don't think meatloaf
is easily applied to stovetop cooking. That doesn't mean you can't, or that
your uncle Delbert's pressure cooker meatloaf isn't delish, it means that
I'm not about to try it or advise anyone else to try it.



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:20 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 23:59:49 GMT
Dog3 wrote:

"jmcquown" wrote in
:

Selma Jane wrote:
Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a
crock pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill




I'm afraid if I made it in a crock pot it would be glop. Never made it on

the stove either. I wonder how that would turn out.



The book that comes with a Crock Pot(tm) claims that you can cook
anything in it very well, even bread.

I say it's all just a crock. It's no more of a universal cooker than an
Amana Radar Range, which of course has cookbooks available that explain
how you can cook anything in it very well.

Every job has it's appropriate tools. You can make meatloaf on your
car's exaust manifold - that doesn't mean you should.

Most of this discussion seems to revolve around meatloaf baked inside a
pan - the other method is to use a pan to form it and then turn it out onto
a flat baking sheet that has a lip, and liberally apply a tomato-based
glaze. This allows the fat to run out and promotes crust formation.

You can use any heat source you like to cook your food. Some will
provide better results than others for some foods. I don't think meatloaf
is easily applied to stovetop cooking. That doesn't mean you can't, or that
your uncle Delbert's pressure cooker meatloaf isn't delish, it means that
I'm not about to try it or advise anyone else to try it.

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:31 AM
Mash
 
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"X-No-Archive: yes"


Actually my mother's recipe was fairly decent. It was a moist meat
loaf, not like oven baked, but decent. We ate the meat loaf a lot
during summer because firing up the oven when it was 118 degrees
outside didn't appeal. She had five young children to feed so meat loaf
was a popular meal.

You are right about the right equipment does determine how the finished
product will turn out. I have made meat loaf in the microwave (when it
was 118 degrees outside) and the product was tasty but not like oven
baked meat loaf. I've also made muffins and cakes in the microwave for
the same reason. Both turned out well but not exactly like their oven
baked counter parts. Good but not the same.

Slow cookers are good for pot roasts, soups and some sauces. Anything
that benefits from simmering and slow cooking are good candidates for
the crock pot.

Mary
Mary

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Old 30-03-2005, 01:31 AM
Mash
 
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"X-No-Archive: yes"


Actually my mother's recipe was fairly decent. It was a moist meat
loaf, not like oven baked, but decent. We ate the meat loaf a lot
during summer because firing up the oven when it was 118 degrees
outside didn't appeal. She had five young children to feed so meat loaf
was a popular meal.

You are right about the right equipment does determine how the finished
product will turn out. I have made meat loaf in the microwave (when it
was 118 degrees outside) and the product was tasty but not like oven
baked meat loaf. I've also made muffins and cakes in the microwave for
the same reason. Both turned out well but not exactly like their oven
baked counter parts. Good but not the same.

Slow cookers are good for pot roasts, soups and some sauces. Anything
that benefits from simmering and slow cooking are good candidates for
the crock pot.

Mary
Mary

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:37 AM
Scratch Ankle Wood
 
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Meat loaf works extremely well in a crock pot. My question is, why do
you all insist on cross posting this in rec.woodworking?

Dog3 wrote:
"jmcquown" wrote in
:


Selma Jane wrote:

Of course, the traditional way to prepare a meat loaf is in the oven.
But I've heard of some people making it on the stove like a pot roast.
Have you ever made it that way?

Selma Jane


I've never tried it. I've heard of some people doing meatloaf in a crock
pot. Never tried that, either.

Jill





I'm afraid if I made it in a crock pot it would be glop. Never made it on
the stove either. I wonder how that would turn out.

Michael

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:53 AM
Vox Humana
 
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"Mash" wrote in message
ups.com...
"X-No-Archive: yes"


Actually my mother's recipe was fairly decent. It was a moist meat
loaf, not like oven baked, but decent. We ate the meat loaf a lot
during summer because firing up the oven when it was 118 degrees
outside didn't appeal. She had five young children to feed so meat loaf
was a popular meal.


I would rather fire up the oven in hot weather than braise something for
hours on the range top. At least the oven is insulated.




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 01:57 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On 29 Mar 2005 16:31:10 -0800
"Mash" wrote:

"X-No-Archive: yes"



You know, google groups won't recognize (and won't obey) this if there
are ANY blank lines between it and the regular headers. And especially not
in quotes. It just makes you look like a doofus. I guarantee that your
message was archived.

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 02:02 AM
Mash
 
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X-No-Archive: yes
Actually the meat loaf doesn't take hours to braise...and believe me
you don't want the oven running when the temps are in triple digits
unless you are wealthy and can afford an AC.

Mary

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 02:02 AM
Mash
 
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X-No-Archive: yes
Actually the meat loaf doesn't take hours to braise...and believe me
you don't want the oven running when the temps are in triple digits
unless you are wealthy and can afford an AC.

Mary

  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 05:00 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On 29 Mar 2005 17:02:03 -0800
"Mash" wrote:

X-No-Archive: yes



Why do people do this, anyway? some sort of bizarre paranoia?


Actually the meat loaf doesn't take hours to braise...and believe me
you don't want the oven running when the temps are in triple digits
unless you are wealthy and can afford an AC.



Hey, if you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen.

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 03:55 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Mash" wrote in message
ups.com...
X-No-Archive: yes
Actually the meat loaf doesn't take hours to braise...and believe me
you don't want the oven running when the temps are in triple digits
unless you are wealthy and can afford an AC.


If the heat is such an issue, then I would cook outside.




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