Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 21-10-2003, 03:53 PM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 13:15:45 GMT, Blanche Nonken
wrote:

"Vox Humana" wrote:


That all makes sense to me.


Or, if you're the patient sort, buy a few cans every year. About five
or ten years down the road, the first ones you bought should have
reached that state on their own.

(Just opened a 6 year old tin of SCM for my coffee - it was darkened and
thick. The longer it sits, the better. :-))


And you don't even live in a warm climate! Imagine how quickly that
would work for me?

--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davida @ jdc . org . il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~
Links to my published poetry - http://davidachazan.homestead.com/
~*~*~*~*~*~

  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 07:00 PM
Marilyn©
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

In ,
Vox Humana took a deep breath, sighed and spoke thusly:
"Blanche Nonken" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote:


That all makes sense to me.


Or, if you're the patient sort, buy a few cans every year. About
five
or ten years down the road, the first ones you bought should have
reached that state on their own.

(Just opened a 6 year old tin of SCM for my coffee - it was darkened
and thick. The longer it sits, the better. :-))


I had that happen to me once. I don't use much SCM and when I opened
an old can it was dark. I threw it away thinking it was spoiled!


All this talk now has me wanting to open the can that's been sitting in my cupboard for
years and years (I think it got bought by mistake, probably by my spouse who thought he
was buying evaporated milk).

--
Marilyn
-----------
"They got a name for the winners in the world
I want a name when I lose"


  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2003, 08:29 PM
Bill
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage



Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
Why does covering the can make it safer?

Water under normal pressure conditions will not exceed 212 degrees (the
boiling point). The water prevents the contents from getting too hot and
exploding the can.

Dimitri


I understand that part. I just question why Brian claims that the can has
to be completely submerged.


Much cross posting snipped
Only thing I can think of is even cooking of the contents. If the can is
out of the water, it will be exposed to steam at 212, but no higher. I
don't see how else the contents would be affected. Am I missing something?
Ed

http://pages.cthome.net/edhome


The bottom of the can that is in contact with the pan will be exposed to temps
somewhat higher than 212 degrees. As water is a better conductor of heat than
steam the more water that is in contact with the can the less likely it is the
contents of the can will exceed 212 degress and get anywhere near its boiling
point.

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Old 22-10-2003, 12:00 AM
Mike Stith
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

If you use a pressure cooker, you need to reduce the cooking
time...15-20 minutes is a plenty. Any more than that and you'll
probably overcook it.

zxcvbob wrote:
Vox Humana wrote:
I can see how the contents of the can might


not cook evenly if isn't fully covered, but that is the opposite of
having
the can explode.


Making sure the can is fully submerged doesn't do anything except give
you more water in the pot so it takes longer to boil dry while you're
not watching it.

It's a harmless but needless precaution. Just like sterilizing your
jars before you fill them when you're gonna pressure-can them anyway.

I think pressure cooking several unopened cans at once for an hour at 15
pounds makes sense; the extra cans can be stored on the shelf ready-to-use.

Best regards,
Bob



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Old 22-10-2003, 12:02 AM
Mike Stith
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

How do you think non-acidic foods such as meats and fish are "canned"??
They're loaded into giant pressure cookers for processing.

Julia Altshuler wrote:

Aurrggh! I don't know if this guy means to be funny or not, but NEVER
heat any unopened can! In fact, this one should go in the kitchen myths
thread. I don't know where people got the idea that heating condensed
milk in the can makes caramel, but it is a bad idea. One of the brands
has even started printing warnings on the label.

And while I'm at admonitions, why the unrelated cross posts? (I erased
them.)

--Lia


Vox Humana wrote:

The easy way to make Dulce De Leche is to put an unopened can of
sweetened
condensed milk into a small pan. Add water to bring it to about 3/4
the way
up the can. Bring to a boil and simmer for about an hour. Let cool
completely before opening. You can turn the can over after 30 minutes.
Store in a jar or plastic container. It should keep for a couple of
weeks
in the refrigerator, maybe more

A quicker method is to use a pressure cooker. Cook at pressure for 30
minutes -- 45 minutes if you want it darker.






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Old 22-10-2003, 12:22 AM
qahtan
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

You have to simmer it for about 4 hours to get it the right colour. 1 hour
will hardly do anything. but keep the can covered, you can do many all at
once, qahtan



"JOAT" wrote in message
om...
Hi. Does anyone have a good recipe to make caramel or Dulce De Leche?
And tips on how to store it in jars or cans?



  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 02:00 AM
zxcvbob
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

Mike Stith wrote:
How do you think non-acidic foods such as meats and fish are "canned"??
They're loaded into giant pressure cookers for processing.


Yes, but when do they crimp on the lids? I have some old canning books
that deal with using metal cans. I'll look it up tonight, but I think the
lids are crimped after they come out of the autoclave.

Bob

  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 03:32 AM
Doug Miller
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

Folks, please trim your headers before replying, to remove irrelevant groups.
This thread is cross-posted into rec.woodworking and rec.photo.equipment.35mm,
where it is obviously off-topic.

Thanks.

In article , "qahtan"
wrote:
You have to simmer it for about 4 hours to get it the right colour. 1 hour
will hardly do anything. but keep the can covered, you can do many all at
once, qahtan



"JOAT" wrote in message
. com...
Hi. Does anyone have a good recipe to make caramel or Dulce De Leche?
And tips on how to store it in jars or cans?



  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-10-2003, 05:31 PM
Mike Stith
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

The lids are put on before they're processed.

zxcvbob wrote:
Mike Stith wrote:

How do you think non-acidic foods such as meats and fish are
"canned"?? They're loaded into giant pressure cookers for processing.


Yes, but when do they crimp on the lids? I have some old canning books
that deal with using metal cans. I'll look it up tonight, but I think
the lids are crimped after they come out of the autoclave.

Bob


  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-10-2003, 10:32 AM
Leicaddict
 
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Default Dulce De Leche recipe and storage

"qahtan" wrote in message ...
You have to simmer it for about 4 hours to get it the right colour. 1 hour
will hardly do anything. but keep the can covered, you can do many all at
once, qahtan


They do sell it already made in the can. It costs about 3 bucks a can.


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