Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 01:16 AM
The Cook
 
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"Raj V" wrote:

From the several bread books I've read, I don't get the sense making bread
is an exact science. "Hold out a cup of flour in case" . . . . "Add more
water if . . . " Measuring to a gram or single digit percentage point seems
superfluous with those instructions, so I agree any "law of baking" is
probably going too far, though some do try. My mom made bread all her life
and never measured anything or went by a recipe that I know of and the bread
was invariably wonderful, much better than anything bought in the store or
bakery. My credo is try my best, enjoy doing it, and learn from each
experience. If I throw in something like flax meal or steel cut oatmeal when
it isn't called for in the recipe, the results are at least interesting, and
usually edible. I am having fun.

Your mother may not have used a recipe, but she probably learned from
her mother how to do it. "Take a couple of the scoops of flour, this
much yeast, some salt." She was shown how much of each thing to use
and how the dough looked and felt at each stage.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 01:26 AM
Vox Humana
 
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"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm sensing a bit of arrogance in this group, its like people are using
this group as a means of establishing their own preference as some sort
of law of baked goods.
The Point: I think you need to stop being so judgemental about
something as trivial as bread, not everyone has the time or space to
allow a bread to rise for 13 hours, so 75 minutes for a decent loaf of
freshly baked bread isn't that bad. And hey, when I have 13 hours to
kill, when I am 80, I will try rising the bread for the 'required
time.'
Aaron, wondering if this group should be called the
rec.foods.yeast-growing-discussion


I don't think this group is being so judgmental as it is helpful; in that
they would like people to realize that there are differences in the taste

of
bread that has risent longer. I recall going to a famous bread store that
had a good reputation and we wanted to share this good bread with friends

of
ours who were with us. They got all stiff and resistant and even though

we
sat and ate some that we purchased at the store, they wouldn't even taste
it. They had no curiousity how it tasted, nor an inclination to buy a

loaf
and take it home.
Different strokes.
Dee


I love people who post messages calling people names and then accuse
everyone else of being judgmental. I also wonder if "Aaron" bothered to
read much of what people have written. I do recall the word "refrigerator"
mentioned a number of times. That is, you don't have to sit there
monitoring the dough for 13 hours. You simply put it in the refrigerator
and get about your normal business. Also, the baking police aren't going to
jail you for baking the way that you want. Just because I don't like
something or recommend a particular method doesn't mean that anyone is
required to agree. I think it is best to know the basics and strive for the
ideal. Sometimes you have to compromise, but if no one ever bothers with a
discussion of the ideal, then we are all doomed to mediocrity. Ignorance may
be bliss, but it doesn't lead to good baking.


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 09:12 PM
Vox Humana
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
Well, I was proven correct. This group does contain a great deal of
arrogance, a kind of stupid elitism about some construct of 'longer'
rising.


Don't let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya.


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 09:13 PM
 
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Well, I was proven correct. This group does contain a great deal of
arrogance, a kind of stupid elitism about some construct of 'longer'
rising. In the brief period I've been on this group. I have receive
more MIS-information than anything else. I'm glad you all have found a
drawn out way of making bread. I was simply offended at the put downs
about the "fast way" of bread making, my preference. But the truth is
if you actually kneaded the bread correctly and appropriately, the
bread has a delicious and wonderful flavor. Yeast metabolize at an
OPTIMAL temperature of 85 degrees, ~90 percent humidity and it digests
SUGAR, either sugars contained in the flour mix or sugars you add to
the water to 'prime' it. It really doesn't matter how fast the dough
rises so long as there is adaquate gluten derived from the kneading
process and it doubles in size at least once.

The shame is instead of trying to discuss an issue and LEARN a more
natural technique, albeit a more involved method, you criticized it and
me; not a very friendly group, not really about "baking" is it. Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference. BTW, I've only made the 'nasty' bread when its been too
cold for the dough to properly double and apparently have gotten
impatient, should have stuck it in the fridge.

  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 09:27 PM
Top Spin
 
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On 8 Feb 2005 12:13:57 -0800, "
wrote:

Well, I was proven correct. This group does contain a great deal of
arrogance, a kind of stupid elitism about some construct of 'longer'
rising. In the brief period I've been on this group. I have receive
more MIS-information than anything else. I'm glad you all have found a
drawn out way of making bread. I was simply offended at the put downs
about the "fast way" of bread making, my preference. But the truth is
if you actually kneaded the bread correctly and appropriately, the
bread has a delicious and wonderful flavor. Yeast metabolize at an
OPTIMAL temperature of 85 degrees, ~90 percent humidity and it digests
SUGAR, either sugars contained in the flour mix or sugars you add to
the water to 'prime' it. It really doesn't matter how fast the dough
rises so long as there is adaquate gluten derived from the kneading
process and it doubles in size at least once.

The shame is instead of trying to discuss an issue and LEARN a more
natural technique, albeit a more involved method, you criticized it and
me; not a very friendly group, not really about "baking" is it. Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference. BTW, I've only made the 'nasty' bread when its been too
cold for the dough to properly double and apparently have gotten
impatient, should have stuck it in the fridge.


The only arrogant poster I see is you. If you are so offended, why are
you here? I would suggest that you would be happier elsewhere, but I
doubt that you will be happy anywhere.

--
Hitachi HB-A101 bread machine, 1 pound
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
(01/10/05)


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 10:05 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Raj V" wrote in message
...
Ah, just block the sender. He will never show up again. Unfortunately, any
replies to his rantings will, so just don't reply to him.


I find him amusing.


  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2005, 01:36 AM
graham
 
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
Well, I was proven correct. This group does contain a great deal of
arrogance, a kind of stupid elitism about some construct of 'longer'
rising. In the brief period I've been on this group. I have receive
more MIS-information than anything else. I'm glad you all have found a
drawn out way of making bread. I was simply offended at the put downs
about the "fast way" of bread making, my preference. But the truth is
if you actually kneaded the bread correctly and appropriately, the
bread has a delicious and wonderful flavor. Yeast metabolize at an
OPTIMAL temperature of 85 degrees, ~90 percent humidity and it digests
SUGAR, either sugars contained in the flour mix or sugars you add to
the water to 'prime' it. It really doesn't matter how fast the dough
rises so long as there is adaquate gluten derived from the kneading
process and it doubles in size at least once.

The shame is instead of trying to discuss an issue and LEARN a more
natural technique, albeit a more involved method, you criticized it and
me; not a very friendly group, not really about "baking" is it. Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference. BTW, I've only made the 'nasty' bread when its been too
cold for the dough to properly double and apparently have gotten
impatient, should have stuck it in the fridge.

What meds are you taking? They seem to have given you a remarkably thin
skin as well as affected your English comprehension. There's no elitism
here - just a bunch of very helpful people trying to give you the benefit of
their experience. If you can't see that then "va-te-faire enculer"!
Graham


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2005, 01:23 PM
Kenneth
 
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On 8 Feb 2005 12:13:57 -0800, "
wrote:

Yeast metabolize at an
OPTIMAL temperature of 85 degrees,


Howdy,

Perhaps you are confusing "OPTIMAL" with most rapid...

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2005, 02:57 PM
Dee Randall
 
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
Well, I was proven correct. This group does contain a great deal of
arrogance, a kind of stupid elitism about some construct of 'longer'
rising. In the brief period I've been on this group. I have receive
more MIS-information than anything else. I'm glad you all have found a
drawn out way of making bread. I was simply offended at the put downs
about the "fast way" of bread making, my preference. But the truth is
if you actually kneaded the bread correctly and appropriately, the
bread has a delicious and wonderful flavor. Yeast metabolize at an
OPTIMAL temperature of 85 degrees, ~90 percent humidity and it digests
SUGAR, either sugars contained in the flour mix or sugars you add to
the water to 'prime' it. It really doesn't matter how fast the dough
rises so long as there is adaquate gluten derived from the kneading
process and it doubles in size at least once.

The shame is instead of trying to discuss an issue and LEARN a more
natural technique, albeit a more involved method, you criticized it and
me; not a very friendly group, not really about "baking" is it.


Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference.


Please re-read my email. I did not refer to you by name at all.


BTW, I've only made the 'nasty' bread when its been too
cold for the dough to properly double and apparently have gotten
impatient, should have stuck it in the fridge.


Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference.


Please re-read my email. I did not refer to you by name at all. I have no
reason to disrespect you at all.
Dee




  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2005, 05:46 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

wrote in message
oups.com...



Also
Dee, please do not disrespect me, "Aaron" is my name not some abstract
reference.


Please re-read my email. I did not refer to you by name at all. I have no
reason to disrespect you at all.
Dee


I don't know. After the last message I think I have a reason or two.




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