Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 04:24 AM
 
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Default Eiser cake question

Hello everybody,

I'm a regular lurker, so while you're not new to me I'm new to you.I'm
hoping that somebody here can answer a question that has been driving
me crazy for years.

I've got what looks to be a good recipe for Eiser Cake cookies. It
comes from a cookbook I trust and reading through it, it looks like it
should work. The only problem I have with it is that the instructions
state "Eiser cake can only be made in an Eiser Cake iron."

Now all that would be well and good, if
a) I could find an Eiser Cake iron or
b) I could see a picture of one so that I can figure out a
work-around.

Now I've been searching for an Eiser Cake iron for years -- both
online and in actual stores, and I've struck out every time. I'm not
sure if this is because these things simply don't exist, or if they
are known under a different name.

What my cookbook refers to as Eiser Cakes are the long
(finger-length), rolled cookies that you most commonly see in the tins
of imported biscuits/cookies that are for sale at Christmas time. They
have a light texture and a buttery, melt-in-your-mouth taste. They are
also on the slightly sweet side.

I've been tempted to try them in just a frying pan or on the grill
plates of my waffle iron/sandwich grill, but I've never had quite
enough nerve. I hate wasting ingredients and turning out utter
failures.

Can anybody point me in the direction of an Eiser Cake iron supplier
(preferrably in Ontario) or at least give me some idea of what one of
these rare creations looks like and how it functions?

All your advice will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Vic








  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 08:44 AM
Rona Yuthasastrakosol
 
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Default

da wrote:


Can anybody point me in the direction of an Eiser Cake iron supplier
(preferrably in Ontario) or at least give me some idea of what one of
these rare creations looks like and how it functions?

All your advice will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Vic


I don't know which cookbook you're referring to, but have you considered
writing the author(s) for a source for the iron? If it's possible to
contact them, they'd probably be the best resource.

You could also try e-mailing
http://www.goldaskitchen.com/ --they're a mail
order kitchen/baking ware company based in Ontario. I think they have a
store, too, but I'm not sure. They have an excellent selection, so I'm
inclined to think they may be able to find what you're looking for.

Should all else fail, if you look up a recipe for cigar/cigarette cookies,
you'll find instructions for making the cookies using a dowel. Might just
work for you.

rona

--
***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***

"[America] is filled with people who decided not to live in Europe. We
had people who really wanted to live in Europe, but didn't have the
energy to go back. We call them Canadians." ---Grover Norquist in
Newsweek, November 22, 2004


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 03:31 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
...
Hello everybody,

I'm a regular lurker, so while you're not new to me I'm new to you.I'm
hoping that somebody here can answer a question that has been driving
me crazy for years.

I've got what looks to be a good recipe for Eiser Cake cookies. It
comes from a cookbook I trust and reading through it, it looks like it
should work. The only problem I have with it is that the instructions
state "Eiser cake can only be made in an Eiser Cake iron."

Now all that would be well and good, if
a) I could find an Eiser Cake iron or
b) I could see a picture of one so that I can figure out a
work-around.

Now I've been searching for an Eiser Cake iron for years -- both
online and in actual stores, and I've struck out every time. I'm not
sure if this is because these things simply don't exist, or if they
are known under a different name.

What my cookbook refers to as Eiser Cakes are the long
(finger-length), rolled cookies that you most commonly see in the tins
of imported biscuits/cookies that are for sale at Christmas time. They
have a light texture and a buttery, melt-in-your-mouth taste. They are
also on the slightly sweet side.

I've been tempted to try them in just a frying pan or on the grill
plates of my waffle iron/sandwich grill, but I've never had quite
enough nerve. I hate wasting ingredients and turning out utter
failures.

Can anybody point me in the direction of an Eiser Cake iron supplier
(preferrably in Ontario) or at least give me some idea of what one of
these rare creations looks like and how it functions?


Have you considered using a pizzelle iron?
http://tinyurl.com/528k2


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 06:46 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 04:24:56 GMT, da wrote:
Rona and Vox thank-you for your responses.

Rona,

The cookbook is an old, old Dr. Oetker book. At one time Dr. Oetker
actually sold the irons, but they no longer do so. In fact they don't
seem to have ever heard of the cookies or the iron. I'll try GoldAsk
and see if they can point me in the right direction.

The cigar/cigarette cookie suggestion is also a good one. I had no
idea what those cookies were called in English. I know that sounds
silly, but most of the imported ones I see in the stores come from
Germany or Belgium or Holland and they don't seem to carry an English
label that says "cigarette cookies." They just slap a picture of the
product on the box. Actually I find this problem a lot. I've got lots
of German and European recipes, but if I have to put an English name
on them to describe them to somebody I'm usually at a loss for words.

Vox,

I had never looked at a pizzelle iron. As I said since I have
absolutely no clue what an Eiser cake iron is supposed to look like,
so I didn't know what I should be looking for in a substitute. Also,
I'm pretty clueless about Italian backing in general, although I've
recently added a fabulous apricot biscotti recipe into my list of
no-fail creations.

After looking at a few examples, however, I'm not sure a pizzelle iron
is quite what I want, as the pattern seems to require a pretty thick
cookie -- at least compared to the depth of the cigarette/Eiser cake
layer. I think I'd do equally well with the flat plates of my sandwich
maker. Still it's something to keep in the back of my mind in case I
can't find a better solution.
--Vic




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 07:37 PM
Peggy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message
...
Hello everybody,

I'm a regular lurker, so while you're not new to me I'm new to you.I'm
hoping that somebody here can answer a question that has been driving
me crazy for years.

I've got what looks to be a good recipe for Eiser Cake cookies. It
comes from a cookbook I trust and reading through it, it looks like it
should work. The only problem I have with it is that the instructions
state "Eiser cake can only be made in an Eiser Cake iron."

Now all that would be well and good, if
a) I could find an Eiser Cake iron or
b) I could see a picture of one so that I can figure out a
work-around.

Now I've been searching for an Eiser Cake iron for years -- both
online and in actual stores, and I've struck out every time. I'm not
sure if this is because these things simply don't exist, or if they
are known under a different name.

What my cookbook refers to as Eiser Cakes are the long
(finger-length), rolled cookies that you most commonly see in the tins
of imported biscuits/cookies that are for sale at Christmas time. They
have a light texture and a buttery, melt-in-your-mouth taste. They are
also on the slightly sweet side.

I've been tempted to try them in just a frying pan or on the grill
plates of my waffle iron/sandwich grill, but I've never had quite
enough nerve. I hate wasting ingredients and turning out utter
failures.

Can anybody point me in the direction of an Eiser Cake iron supplier
(preferrably in Ontario) or at least give me some idea of what one of
these rare creations looks like and how it functions?

All your advice will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Vic


Could you be talking about piroulines? (might be spelled piroullines.)
~Peggy


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 08:01 PM
[email protected]
 
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Default

On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 20:39:43 +0100, "Ulrike Westphal"
wrote:


Of course Dr. Oetker still has the recipes and ebay Germany sells an iron.

http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?...9114 770&rd=1

It is a special waffle iron to make the "rolls".

Ulrike from Germany

Ulrike,

I should have known better. I tried contacting the U.S.-based Oetker
offices and they were absolutely clueless. I should have gone directly
to the home office.

I really love the old cookbook, and I've been trying to find a
replacement for it. (The book is my mom's and I'd love a copy for
myself.) The new English books Dr. Oetker is producing don't seem to
come close -- the recipes aren't the same, and the style is entirely
different. Rather than one book with everything in it, now there is a
whole series of books, each with a slightly different focus, and none
with any of my old favourites.

Looking at the iron, I'm surprised to see the pattern. The cookies
pictured in the book are plain, with no grill or grid marks. It looks
much more like the pizzelle iron than I would have thought.

Thanks for the link. Now at least I know what I should be looking for
and that should help a lot.
--Vic



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 08:10 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 10:37:15 -0900, "Peggy"
wrote:

Could you be talking about piroulines? (might be spelled piroullines.)
~Peggy


Peggy,

That's very much like what I'm talking about with a slight difference.

Judging by the commercial varieties I've tried piroulines are a little
drier, a little less sweet and a little finer in texture than the
German-style Eiser cakes/Eiserhörnchen, but that impression might be
an incorrect one. I've never had home-made Eiser cakes, so that's why
I've wanted to try them.

I just want to thank everybody here for being so prompt and helpful
with your responses. I was afraid I was truly on a wild goose chase.
--Vic(toria)



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-02-2005, 12:58 PM
Ulrike Westphal
 
Posts: n/a
Default


schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 20:39:43 +0100, "Ulrike Westphal"
wrote:


Of course Dr. Oetker still has the recipes and ebay Germany sells an

iron.


http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?...m=6509114 770

&rd=1

It is a special waffle iron to make the "rolls".

Ulrike from Germany

Ulrike,

I should have known better. I tried contacting the U.S.-based Oetker
offices and they were absolutely clueless. I should have gone directly
to the home office.

I really love the old cookbook, and I've been trying to find a
replacement for it. (The book is my mom's and I'd love a copy for
myself.) The new English books Dr. Oetker is producing don't seem to
come close -- the recipes aren't the same, and the style is entirely
different. Rather than one book with everything in it, now there is a
whole series of books, each with a slightly different focus, and none
with any of my old favourites.

Looking at the iron, I'm surprised to see the pattern. The cookies
pictured in the book are plain, with no grill or grid marks. It looks
much more like the pizzelle iron than I would have thought.

Thanks for the link. Now at least I know what I should be looking for
and that should help a lot.
--Vic


Vic,
it's the same with the books in Germany. I have one from my grandma printed
in 1930, completly different from the new ones. But there was a reprint from
the books of 1960, I bought them, no bags with ready mixes to open, all
recipes "hand-made".
With this link you reach the "historical" collection site and perhaps you
find what you are looking for....
http://www.droetker.de/cgi-bin/wrapp...MN-4H3M7F-DE-p

Ulrike




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-02-2005, 06:36 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 13:58:40 +0100, "Ulrike Westphal"
wrote:



Vic,
it's the same with the books in Germany. I have one from my grandma printed
in 1930, completly different from the new ones. But there was a reprint from
the books of 1960, I bought them, no bags with ready mixes to open, all
recipes "hand-made".
With this link you reach the "historical" collection site and perhaps you
find what you are looking for....
http://www.droetker.de/cgi-bin/wrapp...MN-4H3M7F-DE-p

Ulrike

Ulrike,

That reprint sounds like exactly what I was looking for, as my
mother's book is from the '60s. While I've copied out all the recipes
from my mom's book that I use, I'd love to have my own copy on hand
when I'm looking for something new to try.

You're right about the newer books. I hate the idea of buying Oetker
custard, Oetker filling, etc. That's not what I consider baking.
About the only Oetker branded products that I buy in order to make the
old recipes are the bitter almond flavour (I find pure almond extract
isn't quite strong enough) and the vanilla sugar (when I've run out of
the vanilla sugar that I've made myself).

I've bookmarked the site you posted. Now I just have to brush up on my
really bad and really rusty German. g I've got a couple of my
grandmother's old cookbooks too and they defeat me practically every
time I try to use them. Besides the basic language barrier, they are
printed in that old, fancy-style German font. I know I should be able
to read that printing, but when I'm already struggling with the
vocabulary, having to guess at the letters doesn't make things easier.


I see the site has my favourite Spekulatius cookie recipe, but it
doesn't have the Eiser cake one. I'll have to see which other of my
favourites is considered worthy of being put online.

Thanks a lot for the great link.
--Vic



  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-02-2005, 07:24 PM
Ulrike Westphal
 
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Default

----- Original Message -----
From:
Newsgroups: rec.food.baking
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 7:36 PM
Subject: Eiser cake question
[snip]

I see the site has my favourite Spekulatius cookie recipe, but it
doesn't have the Eiser cake one. I'll have to see which other of my
favourites is considered worthy of being put online.



http://www.oetker.de/wga/oetker/html...ry=Eiserkuchen
try this link and you get 3 recipes:

Eiserkuchen mit Zimt (Eisercake with cinnamon)

Friesische Eiserkuchen (friesian eisercakes

Eiserkuchen (Eisercake)
Thanks a lot for the great link.
--Vic

You are welcome

If you need some help with translation ask Ulrike dot Westphal at freenet
dot de

Ulrike


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2005, 07:47 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 20:24:49 +0100, "Ulrike Westphal"
wrote:



http://www.oetker.de/wga/oetker/html...ry=Eiserkuchen
try this link and you get 3 recipes:

Eiserkuchen mit Zimt (Eisercake with cinnamon)

Friesische Eiserkuchen (friesian eisercakes

Eiserkuchen (Eisercake)
Thanks a lot for the great link.
--Vic

You are welcome

If you need some help with translation ask Ulrike dot Westphal at freenet
dot de

Ulrike


Ulrike,

Thank you for that link. I guess Ijust didn't search it properly. I'll
be sure to call on you for help if I get stuck translating things.

Once again, thanks for all your help.
Vic




  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-02-2005, 06:09 AM
doyens
 
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Default


Just curious if your search was successful? If not – check out
www.krumkakeiron.com ; there are a lot of Eiser Cake Recipes, tips,
tricks and ideas (which are very useful)!


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Old 28-02-2005, 06:09 AM
doyens
 
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Just curious if your search was successful? If not – check out
www.krumkakeiron.com ; there are a lot of Eiser Cake Recipes, tips,
tricks and ideas (which are very useful)!


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