Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 07:22 AM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 17:02:04 -0500, "Dee Randall"
deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote:



Spread with Apricot or Raspberry jam.

You'll find that as raspberry has seeds it might not be such a good
idea. The classic (according to my Austrian born mother-in-law) is
using plum jam (known as "povidel" - not sure of the spelling). I also
dilute it a bit with hot water for easier spreading.


I have never seen nor tasted a Linzer Torte made with Powidl (Lekvar). I
use Apricot Jam, unless someone specifically asks for Raspberry filling.
The little seeds do not seem to bother them. However, since my husband
died, I have made this cake only once or twice. I am not especially fond
of sweets and my preferred dessert is a nice, crunchy piece of French
Baguette with cheese and a glass of red wine. )


One of the very few times I've had a Linzer Torte was in Vienna or Graz,
Austria and it was made with Lekvar; it was the first one I ever had. I
loved it. I've also had one or two with Raspberry here in the United
States, but it is the one with Lekvar that I really liked. I've not seen
one made with apricot.
Dee

My mother-in-law was from Vienna, and she always made it with Kekvar -
where she got her recipe from, I don't know. When we were in Austria
we went to Linz, and knowing that the torte originated there, I just
had to have some. If I recall correctly, their Linzer was with
Lekvar. I also don't recall seeing it with apricot jam, but I have
seen it with strawberry and cherry jam, but only outside of Austria.

--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 07:22 AM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 17:02:04 -0500, "Dee Randall"
deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote:



Spread with Apricot or Raspberry jam.

You'll find that as raspberry has seeds it might not be such a good
idea. The classic (according to my Austrian born mother-in-law) is
using plum jam (known as "povidel" - not sure of the spelling). I also
dilute it a bit with hot water for easier spreading.


I have never seen nor tasted a Linzer Torte made with Powidl (Lekvar). I
use Apricot Jam, unless someone specifically asks for Raspberry filling.
The little seeds do not seem to bother them. However, since my husband
died, I have made this cake only once or twice. I am not especially fond
of sweets and my preferred dessert is a nice, crunchy piece of French
Baguette with cheese and a glass of red wine. )


One of the very few times I've had a Linzer Torte was in Vienna or Graz,
Austria and it was made with Lekvar; it was the first one I ever had. I
loved it. I've also had one or two with Raspberry here in the United
States, but it is the one with Lekvar that I really liked. I've not seen
one made with apricot.
Dee

My mother-in-law was from Vienna, and she always made it with Kekvar -
where she got her recipe from, I don't know. When we were in Austria
we went to Linz, and knowing that the torte originated there, I just
had to have some. If I recall correctly, their Linzer was with
Lekvar. I also don't recall seeing it with apricot jam, but I have
seen it with strawberry and cherry jam, but only outside of Austria.

--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 07:27 AM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:08:28 -0500, Margaret Suran
wrote:

I have no idea how the dough would be without flour, but using the
amount specified in the recipe makes for a nice consistency.


My mother-in-law's recipe was one she used during Passover so I'm
certain she never used any flour in it. It could just be an adjusted
for Passover version.

I have
used finely ground hazelnuts, hazelnuts, but not toasted, which is not
a traditional flavor for this cake. Here in New York City, almonds
and hazelnuts cost the same, so I use mostly almonds for this cake and
for Vanilla Crescents. I have not made Linzer Torte for several years
now.


I know that hazelnuts aren't traditional for a Linzer, but we got used
to the taste over the years. Why they're less expensive than almonds
here, I'll never know - since almond trees grow everywhere in this
country.


--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 07:27 AM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:08:28 -0500, Margaret Suran
wrote:

I have no idea how the dough would be without flour, but using the
amount specified in the recipe makes for a nice consistency.


My mother-in-law's recipe was one she used during Passover so I'm
certain she never used any flour in it. It could just be an adjusted
for Passover version.

I have
used finely ground hazelnuts, hazelnuts, but not toasted, which is not
a traditional flavor for this cake. Here in New York City, almonds
and hazelnuts cost the same, so I use mostly almonds for this cake and
for Vanilla Crescents. I have not made Linzer Torte for several years
now.


I know that hazelnuts aren't traditional for a Linzer, but we got used
to the taste over the years. Why they're less expensive than almonds
here, I'll never know - since almond trees grow everywhere in this
country.


--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 07:30 AM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:08:28 -0500, Margaret Suran
wrote:

BROWN SUGAR in Linzer Torte? With the dominant flavor of molasses?
Also, how would it alter the texture of the dough? I cannot
imagine a molasses flavored Linzer Torte.


Light brown sugar, actually - that has a much milder flavor, almost
unnoticeable in cakes. That's another one of my mother-in-law's own
changes. She was religiously opposed to refined white sugar, and
substituted for it in many creative ways. For instance, instead of
sugar in her cheesecake, she reconstituted dried apricots and ground
them into a paste. Seriously!


--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2004, 04:01 PM
Ulrike Westphal
 
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"Scott" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
In article ,
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady wrote:

[snip]


Perhaps I'm too late, but while I'm putting my cookbooks in order I found
"Mehlspeisen aus Österreich with the following recipe

-==== REZKONV-Recipe - RezkonvSuite v0.98

Title: Linzertorte
Categories: Cake, Austria
Yield: 1 Recipe

250 grams (8.8 oz.) Butter
250 grams (8.8 oz.) Sugar
3 Eggs
270 grams (9.5 oz.) Peeled and grated almonds
250 grams (8.8 oz.) Flour
1 1/2 teasp. Baking powder
1 Egg, whisked for brushing
1 1/2 teasp. Ground cinnamon
Grated lemon peel
100 grams (3.5 oz.) Red currant jam for spreading, ca.

============================== SOURCE ==============================
Eva Barkos, Mehlspeisen aus Oesterreich 1995
-- Edited *RK* 12/29/2004 by
-- Ulrike Westphal

Mix butter and sugar until foamy, add eggs, almonds, flour, bading
powder, cinnamon and lemon peel.

Fill two thirds of the dough into a buttered and floured round pan
(26 cm = 10 "). Give the remaining third of dough into a pastry
press and form a lattice. (Alternatively you can form the remaining
dough with flour to long rolls and form a lattice.) Brush with the
whisked egg and bake at 175 - 200 °C (350 - 390 °F) for 20 - 30
minutes. Remove from pan and let cool, than spread the jam between
the lattice.

You also can give a wafer on the unbaked dough, spread the jam and
than form the lattice.

=====

Ulrike




  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2004, 04:01 PM
Ulrike Westphal
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Scott" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
In article ,
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady wrote:

[snip]


Perhaps I'm too late, but while I'm putting my cookbooks in order I found
"Mehlspeisen aus Österreich with the following recipe

-==== REZKONV-Recipe - RezkonvSuite v0.98

Title: Linzertorte
Categories: Cake, Austria
Yield: 1 Recipe

250 grams (8.8 oz.) Butter
250 grams (8.8 oz.) Sugar
3 Eggs
270 grams (9.5 oz.) Peeled and grated almonds
250 grams (8.8 oz.) Flour
1 1/2 teasp. Baking powder
1 Egg, whisked for brushing
1 1/2 teasp. Ground cinnamon
Grated lemon peel
100 grams (3.5 oz.) Red currant jam for spreading, ca.

============================== SOURCE ==============================
Eva Barkos, Mehlspeisen aus Oesterreich 1995
-- Edited *RK* 12/29/2004 by
-- Ulrike Westphal

Mix butter and sugar until foamy, add eggs, almonds, flour, bading
powder, cinnamon and lemon peel.

Fill two thirds of the dough into a buttered and floured round pan
(26 cm = 10 "). Give the remaining third of dough into a pastry
press and form a lattice. (Alternatively you can form the remaining
dough with flour to long rolls and form a lattice.) Brush with the
whisked egg and bake at 175 - 200 °C (350 - 390 °F) for 20 - 30
minutes. Remove from pan and let cool, than spread the jam between
the lattice.

You also can give a wafer on the unbaked dough, spread the jam and
than form the lattice.

=====

Ulrike




  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2004, 08:23 AM
Her Subj.
 
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I made my dough (it is now settling in the fridge) for a linzer torte
cookie tonight and totally neglected to add the one teaspoon of lemon
zest. Will this be a problem when the cookie is eventually cooked? What
does the one teaspoon of lemon zest really do, anyway?

HS.

Susan E Desjardins wrote:
If anyone could share a Linzer Torte recipe I would appreciate it.


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2004, 12:39 PM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
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NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On 30 Dec 2004 00:23:51 -0800, "Her Subj."
wrote:

I made my dough (it is now settling in the fridge) for a linzer torte
cookie tonight and totally neglected to add the one teaspoon of lemon
zest. Will this be a problem when the cookie is eventually cooked? What
does the one teaspoon of lemon zest really do, anyway?

Its only for flavor.

--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2004, 12:39 PM
Davida Chazan - The Chocolate Lady
 
Posts: n/a
Default

NOTE: My Correct Address is in my signature (just remove the spaces).
On 30 Dec 2004 00:23:51 -0800, "Her Subj."
wrote:

I made my dough (it is now settling in the fridge) for a linzer torte
cookie tonight and totally neglected to add the one teaspoon of lemon
zest. Will this be a problem when the cookie is eventually cooked? What
does the one teaspoon of lemon zest really do, anyway?

Its only for flavor.

--
Davida Chazan (The Chocolate Lady)
davidac AT jdc DOT org DOT il
~*~*~*~*~*~
"What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of
chocolate."
--Katharine Hepburn (May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003)
~*~*~*~*~*~


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