Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 01:06 AM
Vox Humana
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


Shredded suet is next to impossible to find in US shops, but
most any butcher will obtain it and put it through the grinder for you. I
bought several pounds and put the remainder in the freezer. I plan on
using it to try some other British fare like Spotted Dick, Suet Pudding,
etc.


I can get suet in the meat department of the supermarket. Could just shred
it in the food processor?



  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 01:57 AM
Raj V
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote:
Incredible mincemeat is incredibly easy to make, and while not cheap, is
nowhere near $20 a jar. For the holidays I have used Delia Smith's recipe
for Christmas Mincemeat, and a recipe shared by a poster, June Fawthrop,

on
uk.food+drink.misc. Both are excellent.


I think I have found Delia's recipe but a google groups search does not turn
up the Fawthrop recipe. If you have it, would you mind posting it?

I'll bet there are darned few people who grew up as I did in N.E. Oklahoma,
and I'm only 63. A farm on a gravel road, 20 miles to the nearest grocery,
no electricity, wood cooking stove, kerosene lamps, well water, a working
smoke house, hunting that was not considered a sport but subsistence, fresh
from the udder milk, butter from a churn. Every fall our family butchered a
cow and a pig. The smoke house was tended for weeks with hickory. I
distinctly remember my mother making mincemeat, the meat coming from the
cow's head. Yeah, I wasn't impressed at the time. Wow, talk about being
anachronism!

Thanks,
Raj


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 01:57 AM
Raj V
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote:
Incredible mincemeat is incredibly easy to make, and while not cheap, is
nowhere near $20 a jar. For the holidays I have used Delia Smith's recipe
for Christmas Mincemeat, and a recipe shared by a poster, June Fawthrop,

on
uk.food+drink.misc. Both are excellent.


I think I have found Delia's recipe but a google groups search does not turn
up the Fawthrop recipe. If you have it, would you mind posting it?

I'll bet there are darned few people who grew up as I did in N.E. Oklahoma,
and I'm only 63. A farm on a gravel road, 20 miles to the nearest grocery,
no electricity, wood cooking stove, kerosene lamps, well water, a working
smoke house, hunting that was not considered a sport but subsistence, fresh
from the udder milk, butter from a churn. Every fall our family butchered a
cow and a pig. The smoke house was tended for weeks with hickory. I
distinctly remember my mother making mincemeat, the meat coming from the
cow's head. Yeah, I wasn't impressed at the time. Wow, talk about being
anachronism!

Thanks,
Raj


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 02:01 AM
Dave Bell
 
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Raj V wrote:

I think I have found Delia's recipe but a google groups search does not turn
up the Fawthrop recipe. If you have it, would you mind posting it?


Raj


I located it, but don't have a link to it handy. It was posted by Dave
Fawthrop on November 15th this year, at 15:46 (UT), if I remember the
time correctly. Date is certain, though...

Dave
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 03:34 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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"Raj V" wrote in
:

"Wayne Boatwright" wrote:
Incredible mincemeat is incredibly easy to make, and while not cheap,
is nowhere near $20 a jar. For the holidays I have used Delia Smith's
recipe for Christmas Mincemeat, and a recipe shared by a poster, June
Fawthrop, on uk.food+drink.misc. Both are excellent.


I think I have found Delia's recipe but a google groups search does not
turn up the Fawthrop recipe. If you have it, would you mind posting it?

I'll bet there are darned few people who grew up as I did in N.E.
Oklahoma, and I'm only 63. A farm on a gravel road, 20 miles to the
nearest grocery, no electricity, wood cooking stove, kerosene lamps,
well water, a working smoke house, hunting that was not considered a
sport but subsistence, fresh from the udder milk, butter from a churn.
Every fall our family butchered a cow and a pig. The smoke house was
tended for weeks with hickory. I distinctly remember my mother making
mincemeat, the meat coming from the cow's head. Yeah, I wasn't impressed
at the time. Wow, talk about being anachronism!


Well, your age is between mine and my dad's, but he grew up under
precisely the same details as you describe, and I witnessed them as a very
young child. The only difference was that they didn't hunt for meat very
often. They butchered their own animals and smoked their own meat, but
they also ate a lot of chickens raised on their farm. I also remember the
iceman delivering blocks of ice for the icebox and the milkhouse.

Thanks,
Raj


From June Fawthrop...

Hi everyone, June here, Yes I'm quite willing to share my mincemeat
recipe. It keeps very well and the longer you keep it the better it
tastes.

2Kg. currants
1Kg. raisins
1Kg. sultanas
500g. mixed peel
500g. suet
500g. sugar
4tsp. mixed spice
2Kg. cooking apples
500ml lemon juice

This amount will fill 4x2Kg. marg boxes but you can adjust it to suit
your requirements quite easily.
You can use Veggie suet if you like, it still tastes the same.
Mincemeat needs lots of mixing so I make mine straight on the worktop.
Move everything off the worktop and give it a good wash. Mincemeat is
very messy to make this way and it gets everywhere so if you don't
you'll have twice as much washing up and lots of the wrong bugs.Wash
your hands well and take off your watch and any jewelry.

Spread the currants, raisins, sultanas and peel on the worktop and mix
well. (yes with your hands)
Mix the suet, sugar and mixed spice together and spread on top of the
fruit. Mix well.
Peel, core and grate the apples and mix in the lemon juice to stop them
going brown. (Don't worry if it doesn't work it won't spoil the
mincemeat) Spread the apples on top of the other ingredients and mix
thoroughly. Pack into marg tubs or your usual containers and keep for
two months before using.
Store in the larder or a cool cupboard, I've never needed to keep it in
the fridge.

Give the mincemeat a good stir before using as there is always lots of
juice in the bottom of the tub.

If you want some for Christmas make it now and leave it as long as you
can before using. It will still taste better than shop stuff.

I make mince pies all year round and they don't last two minutes. As
soon as they come out of the oven Dave will pinch one and more disappear
before I have chance to put them away.

In good Yorkshire tradition we always have cheese with Christmas cake
and this works just as well with mince pies. Lift the top and pop in a
lump of your favourite cheese, yummy!

Happy cooking June.



--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2004, 03:34 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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"Raj V" wrote in
:

"Wayne Boatwright" wrote:
Incredible mincemeat is incredibly easy to make, and while not cheap,
is nowhere near $20 a jar. For the holidays I have used Delia Smith's
recipe for Christmas Mincemeat, and a recipe shared by a poster, June
Fawthrop, on uk.food+drink.misc. Both are excellent.


I think I have found Delia's recipe but a google groups search does not
turn up the Fawthrop recipe. If you have it, would you mind posting it?

I'll bet there are darned few people who grew up as I did in N.E.
Oklahoma, and I'm only 63. A farm on a gravel road, 20 miles to the
nearest grocery, no electricity, wood cooking stove, kerosene lamps,
well water, a working smoke house, hunting that was not considered a
sport but subsistence, fresh from the udder milk, butter from a churn.
Every fall our family butchered a cow and a pig. The smoke house was
tended for weeks with hickory. I distinctly remember my mother making
mincemeat, the meat coming from the cow's head. Yeah, I wasn't impressed
at the time. Wow, talk about being anachronism!


Well, your age is between mine and my dad's, but he grew up under
precisely the same details as you describe, and I witnessed them as a very
young child. The only difference was that they didn't hunt for meat very
often. They butchered their own animals and smoked their own meat, but
they also ate a lot of chickens raised on their farm. I also remember the
iceman delivering blocks of ice for the icebox and the milkhouse.

Thanks,
Raj


From June Fawthrop...

Hi everyone, June here, Yes I'm quite willing to share my mincemeat
recipe. It keeps very well and the longer you keep it the better it
tastes.

2Kg. currants
1Kg. raisins
1Kg. sultanas
500g. mixed peel
500g. suet
500g. sugar
4tsp. mixed spice
2Kg. cooking apples
500ml lemon juice

This amount will fill 4x2Kg. marg boxes but you can adjust it to suit
your requirements quite easily.
You can use Veggie suet if you like, it still tastes the same.
Mincemeat needs lots of mixing so I make mine straight on the worktop.
Move everything off the worktop and give it a good wash. Mincemeat is
very messy to make this way and it gets everywhere so if you don't
you'll have twice as much washing up and lots of the wrong bugs.Wash
your hands well and take off your watch and any jewelry.

Spread the currants, raisins, sultanas and peel on the worktop and mix
well. (yes with your hands)
Mix the suet, sugar and mixed spice together and spread on top of the
fruit. Mix well.
Peel, core and grate the apples and mix in the lemon juice to stop them
going brown. (Don't worry if it doesn't work it won't spoil the
mincemeat) Spread the apples on top of the other ingredients and mix
thoroughly. Pack into marg tubs or your usual containers and keep for
two months before using.
Store in the larder or a cool cupboard, I've never needed to keep it in
the fridge.

Give the mincemeat a good stir before using as there is always lots of
juice in the bottom of the tub.

If you want some for Christmas make it now and leave it as long as you
can before using. It will still taste better than shop stuff.

I make mince pies all year round and they don't last two minutes. As
soon as they come out of the oven Dave will pinch one and more disappear
before I have chance to put them away.

In good Yorkshire tradition we always have cheese with Christmas cake
and this works just as well with mince pies. Lift the top and pop in a
lump of your favourite cheese, yummy!

Happy cooking June.



--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2004, 04:56 AM
RsH
 
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Does anyone have an older, meat based, mincemeat recipe as practiced
in Scotland instead of these fruit based ones? After all, that is the
real mincemeat that I thought one should be aiming at.

RsH

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  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-12-2004, 02:08 PM
Margaret Suran
 
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RsH wrote:
Does anyone have an older, meat based, mincemeat recipe as
practiced in Scotland instead of these fruit based ones? After
all, that is the real mincemeat that I thought one should be aiming
at.

RsH

Mince Meat For Pies, Settlement Cook Book, 24th Edition, 1941


3 lbs meat, chopped

1 1/2 lbs beef suet, chopped

6 lbs apples, chopped

3 lbs raisins, seeded (I suppose that means without seeds)

2 lbs currants

L lbs citron, chopped fine

1/2 rind of lemon and orange

l oz cinnamon, ground

1 nutmeg, grated

1/2 oz cloves

3 lbs ground sugar

1 quart boiled cider

1 quart molasses

Salt to taste


Cook all together for 2 hours and seal in glass jars.


Here is another one from the same book.

Mince Meat For Pies

2 1/2 lbs. fresh boiled tongue, skinned and chopped fine

or

2 1/2 lbs. beef rump, chopped

2 lbs sugar

1 orange peel, cut fine

1 nutmeg

2 lbs raisins

1/2 lb suet

1/2 lb currants

l lb citron, cut fine

1/8 oz cloves, mace

1/2 oz cinnamon

1 cup cider

1 quart sour wine

1 cup brandy


Mix all dry ingredients. Put into a preserving kettle with cider and
cook slowly about 2 hours; add wine and brandy; put away in glass jars.

When ready to bake pies, add chopped apples and pecan nut meats.








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