Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 20-12-2004, 10:19 AM
conrad
 
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Thanks for all the tips. I will try to improve next time.

I thought I understood USA terms. UK term for A/P is "plain", ie no
raising agent. You use "cake" flour. Does this contain a raising agent?
We often use "self-raising" for for cakes, though I prefer plain and
add the corect amount of baking soda and cream of tartar.


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Old 20-12-2004, 10:54 AM
Petra Hildebrandt
 
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conrad wrote:

Thanks for all the tips. I will try to improve next time.

I thought I understood USA terms. UK term for A/P is "plain", ie no
raising agent. You use "cake" flour. Does this contain a raising agent?
We often use "self-raising" for for cakes, though I prefer plain and
add the corect amount of baking soda and cream of tartar.


are you familiar with continental European flour types?

all purpose is what over here is called Type 405. Or your plain flour. Cake
flour is a finer ground with usually less gluten, made from low protein
wheat, while bread flour has more gluten (Type 550 over here). Cake flour
would be Type 00 in Germany (and Italy, Farina di grano ternero 00).

What I do when I need cake flour, is, use plain flour mixed with about 2-3
tablespoons of cornstarch per cup, and sift several times.

HTH,

Petra in Haburg, Germany
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Old 20-12-2004, 03:28 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"conrad" wrote in message
ups.com...
Thanks for all the tips. I will try to improve next time.

I thought I understood USA terms. UK term for A/P is "plain", ie no
raising agent. You use "cake" flour. Does this contain a raising agent?
We often use "self-raising" for for cakes, though I prefer plain and
add the corect amount of baking soda and cream of tartar.


The flour I use has no leavening agents. The reason for using the mixture
is to approximate pastry flour. If you have pastry flour, the I would use
two cups of that instead.


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Old 20-12-2004, 03:28 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"conrad" wrote in message
ups.com...
Thanks for all the tips. I will try to improve next time.

I thought I understood USA terms. UK term for A/P is "plain", ie no
raising agent. You use "cake" flour. Does this contain a raising agent?
We often use "self-raising" for for cakes, though I prefer plain and
add the corect amount of baking soda and cream of tartar.


The flour I use has no leavening agents. The reason for using the mixture
is to approximate pastry flour. If you have pastry flour, the I would use
two cups of that instead.


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Old 21-12-2004, 12:33 PM
conrad
 
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Not familiar with continental European flour. It opens up a new vista.
I know that our local baker claims to use French flour for baking
baguettes etc.

I use plain, strong (or very strong) and wholemeal or strong wholemeal.
Strong for bread and pizzas, plain for all other types of cooking
including cakes, sauces and pastry.
I didn't know there was such a variety.



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