Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 18-10-2003, 09:57 AM
Rod
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake

Hi, I'm new to baking and I want to bake a cake with the following
dimensions: 3'X3'X3'. Asssmue standard oven and a time frame of about 5
days. What materials will I need (best size cake pans? Should I go with cake
mix or just raw materials?). What's the best solution for the obvious
structural issues? Is this even realistic?

Thanks in advance...
-Rod

P,S. After reading this myself I feel I should add the disclaimer that this
is not a troll



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Old 18-10-2003, 03:29 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake


"Rod" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi, I'm new to baking and I want to bake a cake with the following
dimensions: 3'X3'X3'. Asssmue standard oven and a time frame of about 5
days. What materials will I need (best size cake pans? Should I go with

cake
mix or just raw materials?). What's the best solution for the obvious
structural issues? Is this even realistic?


I would get a 9x9x3 inch pan and cut the cake into nine pieces that are
3X3X3. Cake supply stores will have 3" deep pans. You might look under
"cheesecake pan" as they are generally 3 inches deep and have a removable
bottom. If that doesn't work for you, then I would cut some cardboard
(think gift box) to a width of 3 1/2 inches and cover it with foil. I would
line the sides of a 9X9 or 6X6 inch square pan with the foil to extend the
depth. Bake the cake and then cut it into the size you want with a serrated
knife. Once it is frosted no one will know the difference. You might want
to decrease the baking temperature by 25F and extend the baking time. With
a cake that thick you can count on it forming a dome that will have to be
leveled.

If you don't have a local source for pans you might try Sugarcraft
www.sugarcraft.com They might be able to FedEx or UPS the pan overnight.


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Old 18-10-2003, 08:09 PM
ConnieG999
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake

"Vox Humana" writes:

I would get a 9x9x3 inch pan and cut the cake into nine pieces that are
3X3X3.


Didn't he specify 3' (feet) x 3' x 3'??
I'd suggest making a whole bunch of 9/13 pans and putting them together in a
square on a big piece of covered cardboard, except that certainly wouldn't make
the 3' height. Maybe just keep stacking, like a brick wall?? (G)



Connie
************************************************** ***
My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.

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Old 19-10-2003, 03:28 AM
Vox Humana
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake


"ConnieG999" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" writes:

I would get a 9x9x3 inch pan and cut the cake into nine pieces that are
3X3X3.


Didn't he specify 3' (feet) x 3' x 3'??


As Roseanna Roseannadanna would say, "Never mind!" I guess I should get my
glasses changed.




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Old 19-10-2003, 03:34 AM
Vox Humana
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake


"Eric Jorgensen" wrote in message
...
On 18 Oct 2003 19:09:54 GMT
(ConnieG999) wrote:

"Vox Humana" writes:

I would get a 9x9x3 inch pan and cut the cake into nine pieces that
are 3X3X3.


Didn't he specify 3' (feet) x 3' x 3'??
I'd suggest making a whole bunch of 9/13 pans and putting them
together in a square on a big piece of covered cardboard, except that
certainly wouldn't make the 3' height. Maybe just keep stacking, like
a brick wall?? (G)



I think there are still architectural issues. Not that they couldn't be
overcome, but i think it would reduce the effect of having a cubic yard
of cake if you had sheets of reinforcing material through it.


Making the cake three fee high would be an issue. You would have to
reinforce it, just like when you stack cakes for a wedding cake. I would
definitely use a dense cake like a pound cake. I would be careful about
what I spread between the layers to minimize slipping. For reinforcements I
would get PVC pipe from the hardware store, probably one inch pipe, and
drive it through the layers. The cake would have to be built in place
because moving it would be risky and it would be very heavy. I think I
would consider making a dummy cake out of Styrofoam with maybe the top being
made from real cake. I would cut the top piece and promptly have it whisked
away to the kitchen where someone could have a sheetcake cut into servings
and waiting to be distributed.


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Old 20-10-2003, 09:36 PM
Rod
 
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Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake

Thank you all for the suggestions... they have been very helpful...

"Rod" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi, I'm new to baking and I want to bake a cake with the following
dimensions: 3'X3'X3'. Asssmue standard oven and a time frame of about 5
days. What materials will I need (best size cake pans? Should I go with

cake
mix or just raw materials?). What's the best solution for the obvious
structural issues? Is this even realistic?

Thanks in advance...
-Rod

P,S. After reading this myself I feel I should add the disclaimer that

this
is not a troll




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Old 22-10-2003, 01:27 PM
Minteeleaf
 
Posts: n/a
Default Need a 3'X3'X3' cake

Rod wrote:

Hi, I'm new to baking and I want to bake a cake with the following
dimensions: 3'X3'X3'. Asssmue standard oven and a time frame of about 5
days. What materials will I need (best size cake pans? Should I go with cake
mix or just raw materials?). What's the best solution for the obvious
structural issues? Is this even realistic?

Thanks in advance...
-Rod

P,S. After reading this myself I feel I should add the disclaimer that this
is not a troll


If I wanted cake layers 3 feet high, I would run thin, long
wooden dowels through it vertically, at intervals,
to hold the layers straight & keep them from sliding off
each other. Cover all with frosting.

Minteeleaf


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