Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 25-08-2011, 10:32 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

An Australian scone is a sweet thing - I wouldn't have picked it as
the same as an American biscuit.

Really? The scones I'm used to don't become sweet until after you've
spread on the jam and cream.


Then you're making them wrong.


Nonsense. I'm with Peter. Cheese scones, herb scones etc. Some plain
scone recipes include sugar but many don't.


You're not exactly with Peter ... unless you are spreading jam and cream
on those cheese scones.

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Old 25-08-2011, 09:02 PM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:32:46 +0100, Jonathan de Boyne Pollard
wrote:

An Australian scone is a sweet thing - I wouldn't have picked it as
the same as an American biscuit.

Really? The scones I'm used to don't become sweet until after you've
spread on the jam and cream.

Then you're making them wrong.


Nonsense. I'm with Peter. Cheese scones, herb scones etc. Some plain
scone recipes include sugar but many don't.


You're not exactly with Peter ... unless you are spreading jam and cream
on those cheese scones.


But mark the "etc". Aus and other scones may be plain: you use these
much like bread. And they can be either separate small ones or one
bigger round marked into triangles (I think an American reader
mentioned triangles, too).

As I've mentioned before, accidental experience reveals that
overcooking Brit-type plain scones results in something not at all
unlike a plain biscuit, so it's easy to understand the AmE usage.

--
Mike.
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Old 26-08-2011, 06:50 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:02:55 +0100, Mike Lyle
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:32:46 +0100, Jonathan de Boyne Pollard
wrote:

An Australian scone is a sweet thing - I wouldn't have picked it as
the same as an American biscuit.

Really? The scones I'm used to don't become sweet until after you've
spread on the jam and cream.

Then you're making them wrong.

Nonsense. I'm with Peter. Cheese scones, herb scones etc. Some plain
scone recipes include sugar but many don't.


You're not exactly with Peter ... unless you are spreading jam and cream
on those cheese scones.


But mark the "etc". Aus and other scones may be plain: you use these
much like bread. And they can be either separate small ones or one
bigger round marked into triangles (I think an American reader
mentioned triangles, too).

As I've mentioned before, accidental experience reveals that
overcooking Brit-type plain scones results in something not at all
unlike a plain biscuit, so it's easy to understand the AmE usage.


WIWAL, if we ran out of bread for school lunch, my mother would bake a
"scone loaf", which we would use instead. It wasn't sweetened and used
the same scone dough as normal scones but was loafed instead of
bunned.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
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Old 26-08-2011, 10:01 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

As I've mentioned before, accidental experience reveals that
overcooking Brit-type plain scones results in something not at all
unlike a plain biscuit, so it's easy to understand the AmE usage.


.... or even a possible mode for invention of the foodstuff in the first
place. (-:
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Old 27-08-2011, 07:54 PM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:50:18 +1000, Richard Bollard
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:02:55 +0100, Mike Lyle
wrote:

[...]

But mark the "etc". Aus and other scones may be plain: you use these
much like bread. And they can be either separate small ones or one
bigger round marked into triangles (I think an American reader
mentioned triangles, too).

As I've mentioned before, accidental experience reveals that
overcooking Brit-type plain scones results in something not at all
unlike a plain biscuit, so it's easy to understand the AmE usage.


WIWAL, if we ran out of bread for school lunch, my mother would bake a
"scone loaf", which we would use instead. It wasn't sweetened and used
the same scone dough as normal scones but was loafed instead of
bunned.


Yes, that's one of my family memes, too, except that my mother never
baked it in a loaf tin. I do it myself sometimes, too: delicious
straight out of the oven. There's soda bread, of course...

--
Mike.


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