Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 24-08-2011, 11:38 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

Some are very slightly sweet, but otherwise they are extremely
bland, even by American food standards.


That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html

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Old 24-08-2011, 12:16 PM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html


Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

--
Chris
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Old 24-08-2011, 08:25 PM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

CT filted:

Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.


Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...


The stomach boggles....r


--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
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Old 25-08-2011, 03:51 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html


Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.

--
Robert Bannister
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Old 25-08-2011, 06:08 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On 8/24/2011 6:38 AM, Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:
Some are very slightly sweet, but otherwise they are extremely
bland, even by American food standards.


That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html


I'm in the U.S., and King Arthur Flour produces a line of scone mixes
here with all sorts of things in them that are pretty good, for scones.

Orange - cranberry for instance.

--
Jared


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Old 25-08-2011, 08:43 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

Robert Bannister wrote:
On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:

[of scones]

Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.


Hell, yeah! Now we're talkin' )

--
Chris
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Old 26-08-2011, 06:51 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:51:56 +0800, Robert Bannister
wrote:

On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called them
"scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put raisins,
blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html


Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.


Fetta cheese goes well.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
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Old 26-08-2011, 11:32 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

Richard Bollard wrote:
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:51:56 +0800, Robert Bannister
wrote:

On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called
them "scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put
raisins, blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach
in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...et-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html

Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.


Fetta cheese goes well.


Yes, or pumpkin and sundried tomato.

--
Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au

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Old 26-08-2011, 11:32 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

Sounds like an arthouse film.

===
= DUG.
===

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Old 26-08-2011, 11:47 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

John Holmes wrote:

Richard Bollard wrote:
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:51:56 +0800, Robert Bannister
wrote:

On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called
them "scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put
raisins, blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach
in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...rtisan-Scones-

at-a-Farmer%27s-Market-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-picture-Homemade-Currant-

Scones-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...ked-cranberry-

scones-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html

Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.


Fetta cheese goes well.


Yes, or pumpkin and sundried tomato.

Is sundried tomato a sub-set of all tomato?

--
Les
(BrE)


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Old 26-08-2011, 11:37 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 20:32:10 +1000, "John Holmes"
wrote:

Yes, or pumpkin and sundried tomato.


Would you please post a picture of what you call a pumpkin? Ours are
very watery and I wouldn't use it without a lot of fiddling first.

--
I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila
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Old 27-08-2011, 12:39 AM posted to alt.usage.english,rec.food.baking
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Default the sweetness of scones

On 26/08/11 6:47 PM, Leslie Danks wrote:
John Holmes wrote:

Richard Bollard wrote:
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:51:56 +0800, Robert Bannister
wrote:

On 24/08/11 7:16 PM, CT wrote:
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

That's what you get for calling them "biscuits". If you called
them "scones" like the South Africans, you'd be able to put
raisins, blackberries, blackcurrants, cranberries, or even spinach
in them.

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-321958.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-455702.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...rtisan-Scones-

at-a-Farmer%27s-Market-692552.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-picture-Homemade-Currant-

Scones-383889.html

http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...ked-cranberry-

scones-443243.html
http://stockfood.co.za./image-pictur...es-358545.html

Oooh, I've never tried putting spinach in them! I must try that...

Add a bit of cheese too.

Fetta cheese goes well.


Yes, or pumpkin and sundried tomato.

Is sundried tomato a sub-set of all tomato?


You take all and sundry and subtract the tomato.

--
Robert Bannister
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Old 08-09-2011, 06:43 PM
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Default

if you run out of bread, meals at school, my mother cooked "Bread Scone" that we could use instead. It was not sweet and used Scone dough buns same standard but instead had loafed bunned.


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