Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 14-02-2004, 02:20 PM
Knox Graham
 
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Default Grandma's Bread Recipe

Hello,
I recently came across my Grandmother's bread recipe. In addition to being
VERY labor intensive, it calls for letting the dough rise three times.

I'm wondering what the benefits would be to the three-rise method as opposed
to the two-rise which I am using.

It also calls for cake yeast, which I assume is all that was available at
the time.

If anyone wants the full recipe, I'll send it.

All opinions/advice appreciated!

Knox G.



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Old 15-02-2004, 12:14 PM
zerkanX
 
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Default Grandma's Bread Recipe

On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 08:20:40 -0600, Knox Graham wrote:

I'm wondering what the benefits would be to the three-rise method as opposed
to the two-rise which I am using.


There are people, like myself and your G'ma, who think that the
longer dough ferments the better the taste. It's not the rise-number
as it is the rise-time. The new fangled way is to retard-rise the dough in the
frig for maybe a 24 hours or more. They used to do this in the old days by
putting it in cool cellars overnight.

Anyway the short answer is three rises develop more flour flavor.

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Old 15-02-2004, 11:20 PM
Paul
 
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Default Grandma's Bread Recipe

Extra rises allow the dough to ferment longer, as the other poster
mentioned.

By folding or punching down the dough, you move around the yeast and flour
so that the yeast cells can come into contact with more food.

In effect, you're allow more time for the yeast to flavor the dough without
starving the yeast cells to death.

Most modern recipes have only one ferment rise, and one proofing (after
shaping) rise.

Cake yeast is compressed, fresh yeast and it's the best thing to use if you
can find it. Many people can't, so substitute as follows:

1 .6 oz Cake of fresh yeast = 2 tsp of "Instant" yeast (SAF Instant,
Fleischmann's "Rapid Rise", others)
1 .6 oz Cake of fresh yeast = 2 1/2 tsp of Active Dry yeast.

With the active dry, make sure that the yeast gets wet before being mixed
into the dough, unless the dough is very wet anyway.

Paul

"Knox Graham" wrote in message
...
Hello,
I recently came across my Grandmother's bread recipe. In addition to being
VERY labor intensive, it calls for letting the dough rise three times.

I'm wondering what the benefits would be to the three-rise method as

opposed
to the two-rise which I am using.

It also calls for cake yeast, which I assume is all that was available at
the time.

If anyone wants the full recipe, I'll send it.

All opinions/advice appreciated!

Knox G.





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Old 16-02-2004, 10:21 PM
Roy Basan
 
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Default Grandma's Bread Recipe

"Knox Graham" wrote in message ...
Hello,
I recently came across my Grandmother's bread recipe. In addition to being
VERY labor intensive, it calls for letting the dough rise three times.

I'm wondering what the benefits would be to the three-rise method as opposed
to the two-rise which I am using.

It also calls for cake yeast, which I assume is all that was available at
the time.

If anyone wants the full recipe, I'll send it.

All opinions/advice appreciated!

Knox G.


It is interesting to see such recipe so that I can make a comparison
with my previous breadmaking methods.
I used to prefer such process for my breads than just doing single
fermentation and then proofing, due to superior result in bread
quality.
I also practice a multistage fermentation in making a really soft
roll and sweet dough items. IIRC that recipe I made can be considered
of a four stage to include the final proofing step.
From my observation such process enables to form lighter texture with
better taste and flavour. In addition the bread is more stable to
overproofing hence resulting in better bread volume.


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