Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-08-2004, 07:40 PM
Wayne
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected],
"graham" wrote:

...and wouldn't want to try it with ONE OUNCE of food coloring!

Bleughhh!
Graham


Well, that's two tablespoons--not all that much when divided into
three 8" layer pans. And the recipe doesn't mention what SORT of food
coloring--many of the water-based ones don't color very well.

If you Google the recipe name, you'll find alternate versions that
call for *two* ounces of food coloring.


You have to assume that the recipe calls for liquid food coloring that
is commonly available at supermarkets. Home bakers don't generally
measure ingredients by weight, and since none of the recipes I saw
specified any of the other ingredients by weight, the ounces have to
be liquid ounces. Red food coloring is bitter. I see noting that it
adds to the cake except color. Therefore, you are adding two
tablespoons or more of a bitter substance so when you cut the cake
someone remarks "Look Virginia, that cake is really red!" The term
"red velvet" seems to be appealing to people. I will concede that the
cake is red, but the "velvet" part is pure marketing - sort of like
referring to cigarette smoke as "smooth." If you like the flavor of
the cake with the food coloring, I would recommend that you just
substitute two tablespoons of water or milk. I has to be an
improvment.




What about using 2 tablespoons of cherry juice? It certainly can stain,
and it might impart some color.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

unmunge as w-e-b

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-08-2004, 10:35 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Wayne" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article ptr[email protected],
"graham" wrote:

...and wouldn't want to try it with ONE OUNCE of food coloring!

Bleughhh!
Graham

Well, that's two tablespoons--not all that much when divided into
three 8" layer pans. And the recipe doesn't mention what SORT of food
coloring--many of the water-based ones don't color very well.

If you Google the recipe name, you'll find alternate versions that
call for *two* ounces of food coloring.


You have to assume that the recipe calls for liquid food coloring that
is commonly available at supermarkets. Home bakers don't generally
measure ingredients by weight, and since none of the recipes I saw
specified any of the other ingredients by weight, the ounces have to
be liquid ounces. Red food coloring is bitter. I see noting that it
adds to the cake except color. Therefore, you are adding two
tablespoons or more of a bitter substance so when you cut the cake
someone remarks "Look Virginia, that cake is really red!" The term
"red velvet" seems to be appealing to people. I will concede that the
cake is red, but the "velvet" part is pure marketing - sort of like
referring to cigarette smoke as "smooth." If you like the flavor of
the cake with the food coloring, I would recommend that you just
substitute two tablespoons of water or milk. I has to be an
improvment.




What about using 2 tablespoons of cherry juice? It certainly can stain,
and it might impart some color.


Sure. Why not.


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2004, 10:31 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!



I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of course, the easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy Basan address
this at one time?

Dee



  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2004, 11:25 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!



I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of course, the

easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy Basan address
this at one time?


You may be thinking about the chocolate cake vs. devil's food cake debate.
It is true as I mentioned, that you can change the color of a chocolate cake
by altering the pH. None the less, the red velvet cake is an old southern
recipe that relies on the use of food coloring. I posted a link to several
recipes.


  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-08-2004, 12:44 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!



I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of

different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of course, the

easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy Basan

address
this at one time?


You may be thinking about the chocolate cake vs. devil's food cake debate.
It is true as I mentioned, that you can change the color of a chocolate

cake
by altering the pH. None the less, the red velvet cake is an old southern
recipe that relies on the use of food coloring. I posted a link to

several
recipes.


As I didn't see the link you posted, I googled and here is what I came up
with in "ABOUT"
http://southernfood.about.com/cs/cho...elvet_cake.htm
that you might find interesting:
"
Although the details are sketchy at best, red velvet cake is not as Southern
as many like to think. The story, which began circulating some time in the
1940s, claimed that Manhattan's elegant Waldorf-Astoria granted a diner's
request for the recipe, then a short time later sent her a bill in the
amount of $100. The angry woman, apparently with revenge in mind, then began
circulating the recipe along with the story. Another "baked" legend with the
same storyline is the $250 Chocolate Chip Cookie, also known as the
Neiman-Marcus Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe."

Dee







  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-08-2004, 12:44 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!



I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of

different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of course, the

easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy Basan

address
this at one time?


You may be thinking about the chocolate cake vs. devil's food cake debate.
It is true as I mentioned, that you can change the color of a chocolate

cake
by altering the pH. None the less, the red velvet cake is an old southern
recipe that relies on the use of food coloring. I posted a link to

several
recipes.


As I didn't see the link you posted, I googled and here is what I came up
with in "ABOUT"
http://southernfood.about.com/cs/cho...elvet_cake.htm
that you might find interesting:
"
Although the details are sketchy at best, red velvet cake is not as Southern
as many like to think. The story, which began circulating some time in the
1940s, claimed that Manhattan's elegant Waldorf-Astoria granted a diner's
request for the recipe, then a short time later sent her a bill in the
amount of $100. The angry woman, apparently with revenge in mind, then began
circulating the recipe along with the story. Another "baked" legend with the
same storyline is the $250 Chocolate Chip Cookie, also known as the
Neiman-Marcus Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe."

Dee





  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-08-2004, 01:55 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a

clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate

cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!


I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of

different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of course, the

easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy Basan

address
this at one time?


You may be thinking about the chocolate cake vs. devil's food cake

debate.
It is true as I mentioned, that you can change the color of a chocolate

cake
by altering the pH. None the less, the red velvet cake is an old

southern
recipe that relies on the use of food coloring. I posted a link to

several
recipes.


As I didn't see the link you posted, I googled and here is what I came up
with in "ABOUT"
http://southernfood.about.com/cs/cho...elvet_cake.htm
that you might find interesting:
"
Although the details are sketchy at best, red velvet cake is not as

Southern
as many like to think. The story, which began circulating some time in the
1940s, claimed that Manhattan's elegant Waldorf-Astoria granted a diner's
request for the recipe, then a short time later sent her a bill in the
amount of $100. The angry woman, apparently with revenge in mind, then

began
circulating the recipe along with the story. Another "baked" legend with

the
same storyline is the $250 Chocolate Chip Cookie, also known as the
Neiman-Marcus Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe."


Yes, that is the same information that was in the link that I posted.
Although I doubt that fried chicken was invented in the south, I consider it
a southern dish - same with the red velvet cake.


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-08-2004, 02:08 AM
Wayne
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a

clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red
velvet cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it
is an option available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a
chocolate

cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!


I thought the reddish color of a cake was provided by the use of

different
cocoas along with portions in varying amounts of soda. Of
course, the
easy
way would be to add food coloring, would it not? Didn't Roy
Basan

address
this at one time?

You may be thinking about the chocolate cake vs. devil's food cake

debate.
It is true as I mentioned, that you can change the color of a
chocolate

cake
by altering the pH. None the less, the red velvet cake is an old

southern
recipe that relies on the use of food coloring. I posted a link to

several
recipes.


As I didn't see the link you posted, I googled and here is what I
came up with in "ABOUT"
http://southernfood.about.com/cs/cho...elvet_cake.htm
that you might find interesting:
"
Although the details are sketchy at best, red velvet cake is not as

Southern
as many like to think. The story, which began circulating some time
in the 1940s, claimed that Manhattan's elegant Waldorf-Astoria
granted a diner's request for the recipe, then a short time later
sent her a bill in the amount of $100. The angry woman, apparently
with revenge in mind, then

began
circulating the recipe along with the story. Another "baked" legend
with

the
same storyline is the $250 Chocolate Chip Cookie, also known as the
Neiman-Marcus Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe."


Yes, that is the same information that was in the link that I posted.
Although I doubt that fried chicken was invented in the south, I
consider it a southern dish - same with the red velvet cake.


The first time I ever heard of "red cake", it was called "aldorf Astoria
Red Cake", no velvet about it. It was the same sort of cake, however,
and used the frosting based on cooked milk and flour. The first one I
ever saw was actually quite *red*, so must have had a minimum of cocoa in
it. I've since seen recipes that had as little 2 tablespoons of cocoa
and as much as 1/2 cup.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

unmunge as w-e-b

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2004, 11:02 AM
Michael H.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in news:aFKVc.204871$fv.104121
@fe2.columbus.rr.com:

Therefore, you are adding two tablespoons or more of a bitter
substance


I thought that problem with Red was solved a long time ago.
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2004, 11:02 AM
Michael H.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in news:aFKVc.204871$fv.104121
@fe2.columbus.rr.com:

Therefore, you are adding two tablespoons or more of a bitter
substance


I thought that problem with Red was solved a long time ago.


  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2004, 05:37 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Alan wrote in message
...
On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 04:22:57 GMT, Isaac Wingfield
wrote:

In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Isaac Wingfield" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Peggy" wrote:

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a
clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red

velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an

option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a

chocolate
cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!

Yellow or white cake with lots of red coloring. Usually frosted

with
cream
cheese frosting.
here's a link to an image:

*Never* frosted with anything but a bechamel-sauce based frosting,

IMO;
much lighter than a cream cheese frosting. And the cake is leavened

with
a combination of baking soda and vinegar. I believe that is the

original
recipe: "Waldorf Astoria Red Cake".

However you make it, it sounds absolutely disgusting!
Graham

I wouldn't go as far as saying it is "disgusting," but I do think it is
meant to impress people by the color more than the flavor.


I would respectfully guess that you've never actually *had* any?

Isaac


I've had red velvet cake, and didn't like it. It tasted,
well, like, uh, red food color. Not like cake.


I guess that red food coloring flavor is an acquired taste.


  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2004, 05:37 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Alan wrote in message
...
On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 04:22:57 GMT, Isaac Wingfield
wrote:

In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Isaac Wingfield" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Peggy" wrote:

"Ryan" wrote in message
om...
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a
clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red

velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an

option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a

chocolate
cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!

Yellow or white cake with lots of red coloring. Usually frosted

with
cream
cheese frosting.
here's a link to an image:

*Never* frosted with anything but a bechamel-sauce based frosting,

IMO;
much lighter than a cream cheese frosting. And the cake is leavened

with
a combination of baking soda and vinegar. I believe that is the

original
recipe: "Waldorf Astoria Red Cake".

However you make it, it sounds absolutely disgusting!
Graham

I wouldn't go as far as saying it is "disgusting," but I do think it is
meant to impress people by the color more than the flavor.


I would respectfully guess that you've never actually *had* any?

Isaac


I've had red velvet cake, and didn't like it. It tasted,
well, like, uh, red food color. Not like cake.


I guess that red food coloring flavor is an acquired taste.


  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-08-2004, 10:25 PM
Gloria G Cook
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ryan wrote:
Hi,

This is, I'm sure to many, a stupid question but I can't find a clear
answer elsewhere.

I am saddened to say that I have NEVER seen or eaten a "red velvet
cake". I am ordering a cake for an occasion soon and it is an option
available.

From receipes I find online, it appears to simply be a chocolate cake
with red food coloring to make it appear redish/brown.

Am I correct with that assumption?

Thanks!


Hey Ryan,
Maybe you could order a red velvet amadillo cake much like the one in
Steel Magnolias. That would be ultra sophisticated and a hit with the
crowd. only in the south.


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