Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 13-08-2004, 12:13 PM
Maab
 
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Default Flour?? Bread-AP-Cake

I'm confused by flour. Know this has probably been aske-ED
a million times but browsing certain recipie books at the
bookstore there seems to be no rhyme or reason to their use.

I see some bread,cake,cookie recipies that call for AP flour
and some bread recipies that call for cake flour and some
general baking apps that call for bread flour,and some bread
recipies that call for AP only etc.

What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?

It SEEMS that most high end baking book recipies call for
00 AP flour more than the special "bread" or "cake" flour.
Again...it SEEMS this way just from browsing.

Anyway, thanks for any replies.

Strike,

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Old 14-08-2004, 12:27 AM
Roy Basan
 
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Default Flour?? Bread-AP-Cake

(Maab) wrote in message . com...


What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?

Well in the baking school if you asked a teacher what is the
difference in using all purpose in a cake recipe that was supposedly
be using cake flour; he would say try it for yourself to see the real
difference..
There is some difference that is best explained by actual experience
than just simple explanation that sometimes can lead to
incomprehensible jargon to the minds of novice baking student.
It may not be significant for some people but matters a low for other
individuals.
In cake baking curriculum they had experiments that uses all types of
flour in producing a single cake recipe and then compare the
difference.
But from a recipe point of view:
Cake formulation is so broad and there are recipes that indeed require
bread flour, all purpose flour, plain cake flour , high ratio cake
flour.etc.

If your recipe is simple ( low ratio category home made type) plain
substitution can be done and stilll it can yield a satisfactory cake
but not in all cases.
But for insttutional formulation if it says cake flour, you may even
have to specify the required flour protein , ash, granulation,
viscosity and pH. and if you are an ingredient supplier you must have
to abide to that stipulated flour specification if you want to
continue having business with that particular client.
Roy
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Old 14-08-2004, 12:27 AM
Roy Basan
 
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Default

(Maab) wrote in message . com...


What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?

Well in the baking school if you asked a teacher what is the
difference in using all purpose in a cake recipe that was supposedly
be using cake flour; he would say try it for yourself to see the real
difference..
There is some difference that is best explained by actual experience
than just simple explanation that sometimes can lead to
incomprehensible jargon to the minds of novice baking student.
It may not be significant for some people but matters a low for other
individuals.
In cake baking curriculum they had experiments that uses all types of
flour in producing a single cake recipe and then compare the
difference.
But from a recipe point of view:
Cake formulation is so broad and there are recipes that indeed require
bread flour, all purpose flour, plain cake flour , high ratio cake
flour.etc.

If your recipe is simple ( low ratio category home made type) plain
substitution can be done and stilll it can yield a satisfactory cake
but not in all cases.
But for insttutional formulation if it says cake flour, you may even
have to specify the required flour protein , ash, granulation,
viscosity and pH. and if you are an ingredient supplier you must have
to abide to that stipulated flour specification if you want to
continue having business with that particular client.
Roy


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Old 14-08-2004, 01:54 PM
michael
 
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Default

On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 04:13:30 -0700, Maab wrote:

What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?


Bread Flour = Chewy
Cake Flour = Crumbly
AP Flour = In between

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Old 14-08-2004, 01:54 PM
michael
 
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On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 04:13:30 -0700, Maab wrote:

What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?


Bread Flour = Chewy
Cake Flour = Crumbly
AP Flour = In between

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Old 16-08-2004, 11:57 AM
Maab
 
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Default

Dats the answer I was looking for.

Thanks
What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?


Bread Flour = Chewy
Cake Flour = Crumbly
AP Flour = In between

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Old 16-08-2004, 11:57 AM
Maab
 
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Default

Dats the answer I was looking for.

Thanks
What is the difference and if you took a recipie say for cake
that called for cake flour and you used bread or AP, what would
happen? How would it differ?


Bread Flour = Chewy
Cake Flour = Crumbly
AP Flour = In between



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