Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 01-01-2004, 03:58 AM
Dee Randall
 
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Default Cool Whip


I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients if your recipe calls for
it?

thanks so much.

Dee



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Old 01-01-2004, 04:06 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Cool Whip

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:


I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients if your recipe
calls for it?

thanks so much.

Dee


Dee, Cool Whip is a non-dairy whipped topping that is sold frozen in a
plastic tub. Of all the non-dairy toppings I've tasted, it's probably one
of the tastiest, although no equal to real whipped cream.

For many years Cool Whip came in only one variety. Now there is Lite Cool
Whip (fewer calories), Extra Creamy Cool Whip, and even Chocolate Cool
Whip. There may be more varieties than I know of.

HTH
Wayne
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Old 01-01-2004, 12:18 PM
jacqui{JB}
 
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Default Cool Whip

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients
if your recipe calls for it?


Cool Whip is a frozen non-dairy whipped topping. It's the stuff I
grew up with and I have a nostalgic fondness for it, although I
haven't tasted it in years and I've moved on to real whipped cream.
It's not bad as far as substitutes go, but it's full of chemicals
which you really don't need to ingest. Regular, sweetened, flavored
and/or stabilized whipped cream can often be substituted in recipes
calling for CoolWhip, although you might want to skip or modify such
recipes since they'll often contain plenty of other highly processed
foods.

As for making Cool Whip yourself, I seem to recall a powdered product
called "Dream Whip" that you ... er ... whipped up yourself at home
which was very similar. Don't know if it's still available ... hmm,
it is, at least according to Kraft's website. But other than another
chemically-laden substitute, I wouldn't expect you'd be able to
produce something just like Cool Whip at home.

Anyway, I'd skip both of them and critically evaluate any recipe
containing CoolWhip to determine whether "real" foods could be
substituted with similar results.

Hm ... my bias against highly processed foods is showing.
-j


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Old 01-01-2004, 03:08 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip

snipAnyway, I'd skip both of them and critically evaluate any recipe
containing CoolWhip to determine whether "real" foods could be
substituted with similar results.

Hm ... my bias against highly processed foods is showing.
-jsnip

I think I've never cooked with CoolWhip for the reasons you have given, as
they always seem to have an ingredient I don't have, or something about the
recipe is not to my liking.

I have the same bias. Thanks for answering. I'm glad to know that I'm not
missing anything.

Dee



"jacqui{JB}" wrote in message
...
"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients
if your recipe calls for it?


Cool Whip is a frozen non-dairy whipped topping. It's the stuff I
grew up with and I have a nostalgic fondness for it, although I
haven't tasted it in years and I've moved on to real whipped cream.
It's not bad as far as substitutes go, but it's full of chemicals
which you really don't need to ingest. Regular, sweetened, flavored
and/or stabilized whipped cream can often be substituted in recipes
calling for CoolWhip, although you might want to skip or modify such
recipes since they'll often contain plenty of other highly processed
foods.

As for making Cool Whip yourself, I seem to recall a powdered product
called "Dream Whip" that you ... er ... whipped up yourself at home
which was very similar. Don't know if it's still available ... hmm,
it is, at least according to Kraft's website. But other than another
chemically-laden substitute, I wouldn't expect you'd be able to
produce something just like Cool Whip at home.

Anyway, I'd skip both of them and critically evaluate any recipe
containing CoolWhip to determine whether "real" foods could be
substituted with similar results.

Hm ... my bias against highly processed foods is showing.
-j




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Old 01-01-2004, 03:30 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
snipAnyway, I'd skip both of them and critically evaluate any recipe
containing CoolWhip to determine whether "real" foods could be
substituted with similar results.

Hm ... my bias against highly processed foods is showing.
-jsnip

I think I've never cooked with CoolWhip for the reasons you have given, as
they always seem to have an ingredient I don't have, or something about

the
recipe is not to my liking.

I have the same bias. Thanks for answering. I'm glad to know that I'm

not
missing anything.

Dee


You can always substitute real whipped cream for Cool Whip.




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Old 01-01-2004, 09:15 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip

There is a new French Vanilla and it ISSS goooood.

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:


I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients if your recipe
calls for it?

thanks so much.

Dee



Dee, Cool Whip is a non-dairy whipped topping that is sold frozen in a
plastic tub. Of all the non-dairy toppings I've tasted, it's probably one
of the tastiest, although no equal to real whipped cream.

For many years Cool Whip came in only one variety. Now there is Lite Cool
Whip (fewer calories), Extra Creamy Cool Whip, and even Chocolate Cool
Whip. There may be more varieties than I know of.

HTH
Wayne


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Old 01-01-2004, 09:19 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip

Cool Whip is a wonderful product that comes in many flavours and can be
added to anything. It tastes just like whipped cream. My kids used to
take popcicles and dip them in Cool Whip for treats the same with cookies.
You can add it to any recipe that calls for whipped cream (that has no
taste and lots of fat and cholesterol) it doesn't melt or fade away and
can be added to a 1 pound box of powdered sugar for a great frosting.
Matt

Dee Randall wrote:

I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients if your recipe calls for
it?

thanks so much.

Dee



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2004, 03:43 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip


wrote in message
hlink.net...
Cool Whip is a wonderful product that comes in many flavours and can be
added to anything. It tastes just like whipped cream. My kids used to
take popcicles and dip them in Cool Whip for treats the same with cookies.
You can add it to any recipe that calls for whipped cream (that has no
taste and lots of fat and cholesterol) it doesn't melt or fade away and
can be added to a 1 pound box of powdered sugar for a great frosting.
Matt



Cool Whip is a first cousin to non-dairy coffee creamers. This class of
products contains hydrogenated tropical oils and saturated fat. If you like
them, that is a personal thing. I see little to recommend them. I don't
think they taste very good - certainly not like real whipped cream. Cool
Whip has a strange chemical taste, probably from the artificial vanilla
flavor that it contains. I don't have whipped cream very often, maybe twice
a year. I would rather have the real thing. You can stabilize whipped
cream if you want to use it in pastries.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2004, 06:27 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip

What a surprise as Cool Whip is the largest selling topping of any
including whipped cream.
Whipped cream is not acceptable to most people.
Matt

Vox Humana wrote:

wrote in message
hlink.net...

Cool Whip is a wonderful product that comes in many flavours and can be
added to anything. It tastes just like whipped cream. My kids used to
take popcicles and dip them in Cool Whip for treats the same with cookies.
You can add it to any recipe that calls for whipped cream (that has no
taste and lots of fat and cholesterol) it doesn't melt or fade away and
can be added to a 1 pound box of powdered sugar for a great frosting.
Matt




Cool Whip is a first cousin to non-dairy coffee creamers. This class of
products contains hydrogenated tropical oils and saturated fat. If you like
them, that is a personal thing. I see little to recommend them. I don't
think they taste very good - certainly not like real whipped cream. Cool
Whip has a strange chemical taste, probably from the artificial vanilla
flavor that it contains. I don't have whipped cream very often, maybe twice
a year. I would rather have the real thing. You can stabilize whipped
cream if you want to use it in pastries.



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Old 02-01-2004, 09:05 PM
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip

In article , "Dee Randall"
wrote:

I have always just ignored recipes that call for "cool whip."

What exactly is cool whip - what are its uses?

Can you make it yourself from your own ingredients if your recipe
calls for it?


thanks so much.

Dee


Think imitation sweetened whipped cream.
I just made this pie using 1 pint whipping cream, whipped and sweetened:

{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }

10-Minute German Sweet Chocolate Pie

Recipe By:
Serving Size: 1
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Desserts

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
4 oz. German¹s Sweet Chocolate
1/3 cup milk
2 Tbsp. sugar
3 oz. cream cheese softened
3 1/2 cups Cool Whip
8 ² crumb crust (Johnson¹s prepared crust)

Heat chocolate and 2 Tbsp. of the milk in a saucepan over low heat,
stirring until chocolate is melted. Beat sugar into cream cheese; add
remaining milk and chocolate mixture and beat until smooth. Fold in
Cool Whip; spoon into crust. Freeze until firm, about 4 hours. Garnish
with chocolate curls, if desired. Store leftovers (hah!!) in freezer.

Makes 6-8 servings. Chris and Becky love it. Chocolate crust is good.

‹‹‹‹‹
Notes: Source: Cool Whip container, November, 1980.


Per serving (excluding unknown items): 444 Calories; 32g Fat (64%
calories from fat); 9g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 104mg Cholesterol;
291mg Sodium Food Exchanges: 1 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Fruit; 6 Fat; 1 1/2
Other Carbohydrates

_____
--
-Barb
12-28-03: Tourtiere picture added to my site: www.jamlady.eboard.com
Also a picture of my Baba Authorized struhadlo for making halushky
"If you're ever in a jam, here I am."


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Old 02-01-2004, 09:39 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip


wrote in message
hlink.net...
What a surprise as Cool Whip is the largest selling topping of any
including whipped cream.
Whipped cream is not acceptable to most people.
Matt


Because of your top posting it is really hard to determine your position. I
will assume that your are quite enthusiastic about Cool Whip. Of course,
that's your right as it is mine to prefer real whipped cream. I would point
out that there are lots of products that sell like mad, but that doesn't
make them superior. For instance, Velveeta is quite popular because it is
cheap, melts well, and doesn't require refrigeration until it is opened. My
supermarket regularly puts entire skids of the stuff down the main isle at
room temperature when it is on special. Does that make Velveeta superior or
more acceptable than cheddar cheese. I think not. I also believe that
"most people" don't have a clue about nutrition, and the relationship
between saturated fat and cholesterol. How many people do you suppose
prefer non-dairy creamer over real cream because they think it is a healthy
choice? How many just like being able to have a jar of the stuff on the
table and not have to worry about refrigeration and expiration dates? Many
people think that margarine is more acceptable than butter, but that isn't
the case from a medical point of view. I suppose that you really like Tang
over real orange juice? After all, millions of jars have been sold. By the
way, do you have a source for claims about people's preferences for Cool
Whip?


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Old 03-01-2004, 11:02 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Whip


Alan wrote in message
...
On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 15:43:18 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


wrote in message
thlink.net...
Cool Whip is a wonderful product that comes in many flavours and can be
added to anything. It tastes just like whipped cream. My kids used to
take popcicles and dip them in Cool Whip for treats the same with

cookies.
You can add it to any recipe that calls for whipped cream (that has no
taste and lots of fat and cholesterol) it doesn't melt or fade away and
can be added to a 1 pound box of powdered sugar for a great frosting.
Matt



Cool Whip is a first cousin to non-dairy coffee creamers. This class of
products contains hydrogenated tropical oils and saturated fat. If you

like
them, that is a personal thing. I see little to recommend them. I don't
think they taste very good - certainly not like real whipped cream. Cool
Whip has a strange chemical taste, probably from the artificial vanilla
flavor that it contains. I don't have whipped cream very often, maybe

twice
a year. I would rather have the real thing. You can stabilize whipped
cream if you want to use it in pastries.

I don't much like Cool Whip, but I think the 'chemical' taste doesn't
come from the artificial vanilla. Cook's Illustrated does blind
taste testing, and when they tasted vanilla against vanillin, not one
taster could tell the difference!

I think other things in the mixture have to do with the weird taste.


You might be right. However, as I recall, the CI test concluded that you
couldn't tell the difference when using vanillin in cooked/baked items but
they recommended using real vanilla in things like whipped cream that aren't
heated. One thing for sure it that there is a strange taste to Cool Whip.
I also think it is too sweet.




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