Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 27-07-2004, 06:50 PM
Finocchio568
 
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Default Help! Sweet Dough Rising

I've been baking breads & rolls with great success for many years.. but
occasionally I run into problems when it comes to rising sweet doughs
(panettone, Polish or Russian egg breads & such)...sometimes it takes hours &
hours before the sweet dough starts to rise.. even if it rises, it rises a
little bit. I always check the expiration date for yeast. So what do I need
to do correctly to get the sweet doughs rise promptly & effectively?

Thanks, Michael

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Old 27-07-2004, 08:00 PM
Finocchio568
 
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Default Help! Sweet Dough Rising

Ok here's the list of ingredients for the Polish breakfast bread I"ve been
trying to make but it takes forever to rise...

- 8 Tbsp. sugar
- 1/2 tsp. salt
- 6 Tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
- 1 tsp. cardamom
- 1 whole egg plus 1 yolk
- 3/4 cup warm half andhalf
- 3/4 cup cake flour
- 3 tsp. active dry yeast

So does it look like it needs more yeast?
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Old 28-07-2004, 09:47 AM
Roy Basan
 
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Default Help! Sweet Dough Rising

(Finocchio568) wrote in message ...
I've been baking breads & rolls with great success for many years.. but
occasionally I run into problems when it comes to rising sweet doughs
(panettone, Polish or Russian egg breads & such)...sometimes it takes hours &
hours before the sweet dough starts to rise.. even if it rises, it rises a
little bit. I always check the expiration date for yeast. So what do I need
to do correctly to get the sweet doughs rise promptly & effectively?

Thanks, Michael

There are many factors.....
Maybe you use the same amount of yeast you apply to normal doughs.
Some bakers falls to that habit regardless of the richness of the
dough they are producing.
Think about it, dough richness has a slowing effect on yeast activity
due to high osmotic pressure that the high sugar contents exerts on
the yeast cell.
A common remedy is....
Increasing the yeast to a certain level helps.....
Normally for sweet dough I use 6-9% ( flour basis)compressed yeast or
half of that with dry yeast and nearly a third of that with instant
yeast.
Another option is:
Use a special yeast for high sugar dough.
In my trials its more efficient as it has tolerance to high sugar
levels and the dough tends to rise faster and gives good oven spring.
In addition I tend to use lesser amount of that yeast than using the
common compressed or dry yeast. Most of these high sugar yeast is of
instant type and the usage level will be around 1.5-3.0% flour basis.
In comparison the normal instant yeast can be used at 2-3.5% flour
basis for sweet doughs but still you can notice that the rising rate
is still better with the special high sugar yeast.
If you are using dry yeast properly hydrating it with lukewarm water
should be observed and use it when its really bubbly. Even with normal
instant yeast rehydrating it with lukewarm water seems to make it more
adaptable to sweet dough.
In addition....
A slightly higher dough temperature helps also in the range of 27-29
deg C.
Another is if you use lots of eggs, its better to cream that with
added the sugar to form an emulsion that tends to result in better
fermentation performance.
Making a sweet dough by multi stage fermentation also results in
better fermentation and proofing performance and that is the option
that I use if I have the normal yeast. Divide the flour into three
parts:
First sponge 25% of the flour with just 1.5% yeast and 25% water, let
rise, add 25% more flour and enough water, and little bit of eggs or
egg yolk to form a very soft dough. Let it rise again fully then
finally cream the sugar and remaining eggs including the remaining
yeast and combine the other ingredients and form a soft dough.
Do not overmix, just until the dough has cleaned the bowl and appears
smooth.
The nature of sweet dough is that it tends to slacken as the mixing
goes you should watch out that when the forms a ball that does not
stick to the bowl that is considered optimum time to be removed and
sent for fermentation.
Mix the dough to the point that the dough remains on the agitator and
does not stick to the mixing bowl. it also appears smoother .The sweet
dough is already optimally mixed if it does not stick to the bowl
anymore and you can lift in in one piece from the mixer.
In comparison a normal lean dough still needs more mixing time even
if it reaches at that stage.
If I use a larger institutional mixer I use the sweet dough blade
which makes it more easier to see the developmemt of such dough than
with using a dough hook.
Roy


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