Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 24-12-2003, 05:50 PM
Dee Randall
 
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Default Over-kneading dough

Over-kneading.

Is there a way to tell if you have overkneaded a dough?
Is there a time when you know when to stop kneading?

And what are the consequences?


thanks,
Dee




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Old 24-12-2003, 06:04 PM
Kenneth
 
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Default Over-kneading dough

On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 12:50:29 -0500, "Dee Randall"
wrote:

Over-kneading.

Is there a way to tell if you have overkneaded a dough?
Is there a time when you know when to stop kneading?

And what are the consequences?


thanks,
Dee



Howdy,

I don't know about over-kneading, but I do know that kneading is
over-rated...

In fact, for many breads, we are better off with no kneading at all.
Generally, more kneading leads to a finer (smaller hole) crumb. That
is just the opposite of the goal for many breads. I have found that my
mixer (a 20 Quart Hobart) is so efficient, that for many of the breads
I do, it "over-kneads" if I run it only long enough to moisten the
ingredients.

Hydration alone will create the gluten strands we want for bread...

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 24-12-2003, 06:10 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default Over-kneading dough


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Over-kneading.

Is there a way to tell if you have overkneaded a dough?
Is there a time when you know when to stop kneading?

And what are the consequences?


I know that technically it is possible to over-knead dough and I believe
that Roy addressed this a while back. That said, I doubt that you could
over-knead by hand. Kneading too long in the food processor would soon
overheat the dough and that would cause problems. In Cookwise, Corriher
describes a phenomena that she calls "unmixing." She says that this occurs
when you alternate between fast and slow speeds on a mixer while kneading.
This results in a degradation of the gluten network.

You can see the previous discussion he http://tinyurl.com/ystgm




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