Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-12-2003, 02:26 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

Oops!
It is Not the Vibra Killer scale -- tee hee - it is the Myweigh Scale
http://www.myweigh.com/mediumscales_3001.html

the larger model 6001T - the T stands for the colored scale. and the 6000
series is the 13# vs. 6# for the 3000 series.
I bought the VibraKiller pad (for $2 extra) that goes with it to make it
even more accurate - so they say!

I paid $46.90 + 7.95 for shipping. You can get the 6# for less.

They did deliver quickly yesterday, (I ordered December 5) however,it was
not my scale they sent, it was someone else's order (a plug) , alas!

Dee







"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
. ..
"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

I think I'll put my "air-cushioned" baking sheets away and stick to
the regular baking sheets lined with parchment paper.

I did buy the recent Costco 3pans, plus rack at Costco, and was
disappointed that the 3 pans seems to be much thinner/lighter than
the ones that I had bought there maybe 5 years ago in a pack. But I
still think it's a good deal! When I get my new digital scale (thanks
to "scuba"'s great advice,) I'll weight them out. (I bought the 13#
scales, the 6000T model at the place you recommended, and stuck with
your advice to get the vibrakiller. I was disappointed that I
couldn't get it in green, but I guess blue will be pleasing longer.



Dee, what kind of scale is that? I need a new one. Vibrakiller?

TIA
Wayne




  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-12-2003, 03:15 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from the

day
before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some kind of
tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked her if

she
would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO! - that the

parchment
paper would actually draw the butter out of the item and one would find
loads of butter on the bottom of the parchment paper and that is not what
she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after baking,

I've
not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually draws out the
butter.

Dee


Don't believe everything you see on TV. The food network is particularly
notorious for cavalierly dispensing false information. I'm sure most of the
misinformation is passed along innocently and there is no mechanism for
discussion that would allow for a correction. One has to wonder just how
the parchment would draw the butter out of an item. I would speculate that
you simply see the butter easier on the parchment than you would on a baking
sheet. That might lead to a conclusion that here was a cause and effect
relationship where none existed.


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-12-2003, 09:05 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

snipI would speculate that
you simply see the butter easier on the parchment than you would on a

baking
sheet. That might lead to a conclusion that here was a cause and effect
relationship where none existed.


I thought the same as you that ",,, you simply see the butter easier..." but
then ---

Dee

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from the

day
before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some kind of
tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked her if

she
would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO! - that the

parchment
paper would actually draw the butter out of the item and one would find
loads of butter on the bottom of the parchment paper and that is not

what
she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after baking,

I've
not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually draws out the
butter.

Dee


Don't believe everything you see on TV. The food network is particularly
notorious for cavalierly dispensing false information. I'm sure most of

the
misinformation is passed along innocently and there is no mechanism for
discussion that would allow for a correction. One has to wonder just how
the parchment would draw the butter out of an item. I would speculate

that
you simply see the butter easier on the parchment than you would on a

baking
sheet. That might lead to a conclusion that here was a cause and effect
relationship where none existed.




  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-12-2003, 05:25 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

I've nevered considered that before, but my observation is that parchment
is "greaseproof" and repels fats, including butter.

That aside, if I'm baking something with that much butter in it, it's
doubtful that I'd necessarily use parchment since it probably wouldn't
stick anyway.

Wayne

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from
the day before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some
kind of tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked her
if she would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO! - that
the parchment paper would actually draw the butter out of the item and
one would find loads of butter on the bottom of the parchment paper
and that is not what she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after baking,
I've not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually draws out
the butter.

Dee


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in
message .. .
"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

snipI assume that's also the reason that they should be
immersed.snip


Dee, that should have read, "...they should *not* be immersed." Sorry
for the confusion.


I'm not sure of your statement ?????, but I don't put them in my
dishwasher. First, it's too small; second, if it says, do not
immerse, I don't want water in the dishwasher coming in the 'holes'
and staying there. I would think that putting them in the
dishwasher would be almost the same as immersing them.


That's my thought, too. I have a huge number of baking sheets, only
two of which are the air-cusioned type. Since I don't like cleaning
up, I rarely use them, the other sheets going into the dishwasher.
Using regular sheets, I always "double-pan" them and find that works
almost as well as the air-cusioned sheets.

Having said all that, I really do prefer the air-cushioned sheets for
things that are particularly delicate. I never have to worry then
about over-browning.


I usually use parchment paper, but I've always wondered about the
effectivenss of putting parchment paper on these cookie sheets that
are made with a cushion of air "for the purpose of" preventing the
cookies from burning (and sticking?); then to put parchment paper
on top would be over kill or preventing the sheet from doing its
job.

I know you say, "... regardless of type..." Do you have this type
of cookie sheet that you do use with parchment paper?


Unless I've run out of parchment, I absolutely never put anything to
bake on a sheet without it. That goes for the regular sheets and the
air- cushioned. While there is *less* chance of sticking with the
air- cusioned sheets, it still can happen. Parchment absolutely
prevents it. Otherwise, it doesn't prevent or interfere with the
benefits of the sheet.

The other thing for me (just a quirk, I guess)... For most things, I
don't like using a spatula for removing the items, partucularly
cookies. Rather, I wait until they are firm and almost cold, then
slightly twist and remove. This eliminates the roughed-up bottom
that spatulas often produce. Using parchment guarantees that this
method will work, while without the parchment the cooled cookies
would probably be stuck like glue.

Wayne


Many thanks,
Dee




  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-12-2003, 05:27 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from
the

day
before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some kind of
tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked her
if

she
would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO! - that the

parchment
paper would actually draw the butter out of the item and one would
find loads of butter on the bottom of the parchment paper and that is
not what she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after
baking,

I've
not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually draws out the
butter.

Dee


Don't believe everything you see on TV. The food network is
particularly notorious for cavalierly dispensing false information.
I'm sure most of the misinformation is passed along innocently and
there is no mechanism for discussion that would allow for a
correction. One has to wonder just how the parchment would draw the
butter out of an item. I would speculate that you simply see the
butter easier on the parchment than you would on a baking sheet. That
might lead to a conclusion that here was a cause and effect
relationship where none existed.



Yes, what you said, Vox. Parchment is "greaseproof" and therefore repels
fats. It makes it all the more obvious to the eye when the butter or
other fats "pool" on the surface.

Wayne


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-12-2003, 05:22 PM
Rona Yuthasastrakosol
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...



Don't believe everything you see on TV. The food network is particularly
notorious for cavalierly dispensing false information. I'm sure most of

the
misinformation is passed along innocently and there is no mechanism for
discussion that would allow for a correction. One has to wonder just how
the parchment would draw the butter out of an item. I would speculate

that
you simply see the butter easier on the parchment than you would on a

baking
sheet. That might lead to a conclusion that here was a cause and effect
relationship where none existed.



FWIW, I remember an equipment review done by Cook's Illustrated or Fine
Cooking. They said cookies with high butter contents should not be baked on
insulated cookie sheets. Something about the insulation causes the butter
to melt prematurely leading to leakage. Using parchment paper on cookie
sheets, from what I understand, can work similarly (though not as extremely)
to using insulated cookie sheets. Perhaps that is why the woman on the food
network said what she did--maybe she didn't mean that parchment paper "draws
out" the butter, but that it may cause the butter to melt prematurely and
leak out of the cookie.

I actually like butter leakage for certain cookies--like crispy oatmeal
cookies. You get a really delicious crispy outer ring of butter and sugar.
Yum!

rona

--
***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-12-2003, 06:16 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

Who's your dishwasher, Wayne -- tee hee!
Dee

"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
. ..
I've nevered considered that before, but my observation is that parchment
is "greaseproof" and repels fats, including butter.

That aside, if I'm baking something with that much butter in it, it's
doubtful that I'd necessarily use parchment since it probably wouldn't
stick anyway.

Wayne

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from
the day before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some
kind of tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked her
if she would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO! - that
the parchment paper would actually draw the butter out of the item and
one would find loads of butter on the bottom of the parchment paper
and that is not what she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after baking,
I've not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually draws out
the butter.

Dee


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in
message .. .
"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

snipI assume that's also the reason that they should be
immersed.snip

Dee, that should have read, "...they should *not* be immersed." Sorry
for the confusion.


I'm not sure of your statement ?????, but I don't put them in my
dishwasher. First, it's too small; second, if it says, do not
immerse, I don't want water in the dishwasher coming in the 'holes'
and staying there. I would think that putting them in the
dishwasher would be almost the same as immersing them.

That's my thought, too. I have a huge number of baking sheets, only
two of which are the air-cusioned type. Since I don't like cleaning
up, I rarely use them, the other sheets going into the dishwasher.
Using regular sheets, I always "double-pan" them and find that works
almost as well as the air-cusioned sheets.

Having said all that, I really do prefer the air-cushioned sheets for
things that are particularly delicate. I never have to worry then
about over-browning.


I usually use parchment paper, but I've always wondered about the
effectivenss of putting parchment paper on these cookie sheets that
are made with a cushion of air "for the purpose of" preventing the
cookies from burning (and sticking?); then to put parchment paper
on top would be over kill or preventing the sheet from doing its
job.

I know you say, "... regardless of type..." Do you have this type
of cookie sheet that you do use with parchment paper?

Unless I've run out of parchment, I absolutely never put anything to
bake on a sheet without it. That goes for the regular sheets and the
air- cushioned. While there is *less* chance of sticking with the
air- cusioned sheets, it still can happen. Parchment absolutely
prevents it. Otherwise, it doesn't prevent or interfere with the
benefits of the sheet.

The other thing for me (just a quirk, I guess)... For most things, I
don't like using a spatula for removing the items, partucularly
cookies. Rather, I wait until they are firm and almost cold, then
slightly twist and remove. This eliminates the roughed-up bottom
that spatulas often produce. Using parchment guarantees that this
method will work, while without the parchment the cooled cookies
would probably be stuck like glue.

Wayne


Many thanks,
Dee






  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-12-2003, 04:47 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

Luckily it's not a person, Dee. G We do an unconscionable number loads
while cooking, baking, etc. I just hate washing by hand. The only thing
that doesn't go in is something that is too big to fit! G

Wayne

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

Who's your dishwasher, Wayne -- tee hee!
Dee

"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in
message . ..
I've nevered considered that before, but my observation is that
parchment is "greaseproof" and repels fats, including butter.

That aside, if I'm baking something with that much butter in it, it's
doubtful that I'd necessarily use parchment since it probably
wouldn't stick anyway.

Wayne

"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

Last night I was watching a Julia Child show (I think recorded from
the day before) where a woman baker was baking/demonstrating some
kind of tart/bread/pie with loads and loads of butter in it.

As she was putting it in the oven on a baking sheet, Julia asked
her if she would put it on parchment paper and the baker said, NO!
- that the parchment paper would actually draw the butter out of
the item and one would find loads of butter on the bottom of the
parchment paper and that is not what she wanted.

Even though I've seen parchment paper loaded with butter after
baking, I've not *heard* this before, that parchment paper actually
draws out the butter.

Dee


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in
message .. .
"Dee Randall" wrote in
:

snipI assume that's also the reason that they should be
immersed.snip

Dee, that should have read, "...they should *not* be immersed."
Sorry for the confusion.


I'm not sure of your statement ?????, but I don't put them in my
dishwasher. First, it's too small; second, if it says, do not
immerse, I don't want water in the dishwasher coming in the
'holes' and staying there. I would think that putting them in
the dishwasher would be almost the same as immersing them.

That's my thought, too. I have a huge number of baking sheets,
only two of which are the air-cusioned type. Since I don't like
cleaning up, I rarely use them, the other sheets going into the
dishwasher. Using regular sheets, I always "double-pan" them and
find that works almost as well as the air-cusioned sheets.

Having said all that, I really do prefer the air-cushioned sheets
for things that are particularly delicate. I never have to worry
then about over-browning.


I usually use parchment paper, but I've always wondered about
the effectivenss of putting parchment paper on these cookie
sheets that are made with a cushion of air "for the purpose of"
preventing the cookies from burning (and sticking?); then to put
parchment paper on top would be over kill or preventing the
sheet from doing its job.

I know you say, "... regardless of type..." Do you have this
type of cookie sheet that you do use with parchment paper?

Unless I've run out of parchment, I absolutely never put anything
to bake on a sheet without it. That goes for the regular sheets
and the air- cushioned. While there is *less* chance of sticking
with the air- cusioned sheets, it still can happen. Parchment
absolutely prevents it. Otherwise, it doesn't prevent or interfere
with the benefits of the sheet.

The other thing for me (just a quirk, I guess)... For most
things, I don't like using a spatula for removing the items,
partucularly cookies. Rather, I wait until they are firm and
almost cold, then slightly twist and remove. This eliminates the
roughed-up bottom that spatulas often produce. Using parchment
guarantees that this method will work, while without the parchment
the cooled cookies would probably be stuck like glue.

Wayne


Many thanks,
Dee



  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2003, 03:10 AM
Snowfeet1
 
Posts: n/a
Default good baking sheets (ISO)

I love Doughmaker's Gourmet Bakeware - shiny and textured - very little sticks.
They have a website and also sell in various locations around the country.
The website will list the stores.


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