Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2003, 06:57 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone could give me the infos?
thanks
alan

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2003, 02:49 PM
Jenn Ridley
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

"Alan" wrote:

i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone could give me the infos?
thanks


A gas oven works by burning natural gas (or propane, if it's a propane
stove).

When you turn on the oven, a valve opens, and the gas starts flowing.
An electric ignitor lights the gas. A thermostat tracks the
temperature, and when it gets high, the gas turns off, and when the
temperature gets low, the gas turns back on again (just like a
furnace).

Some older gas ovens have a pilot light instead of an electric ignitor
(a small flame is always burning below the oven floor, and when the
gas is turned on, it ignites). Some really old gas ovens don't have
any kind of internal ignitor at all, and need to be lit with a match.

jenn
--
Jenn Ridley

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2003, 02:58 PM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

Pretty simple device.

There is a piece in the oven that measures temperature, call it a thermometer.
There is a connection between the thermometer and the gas supply, the gas valve.
There is a temperature control knob on the front.
There is an on-off method built into the oven. This is controlled by the control mechanism.

Here's how it works.

You set the temperature and turn the oven on. Say you set it to 350F.

The gas valve opens and the gas ignites, whether by pilot light, electronic ignition or match.

The oven burns some gas and the oven heats.

As the oven heats, the oven thermometer measures the temperature and reports that back to the control mechanism.

The control mechanism is set to respond to a range around the temperature you set. It will go on at a temperature slightly below what you set and off at a temperature slightly above the temperature you set. In this instance, let's say that it is set at 10F above and below the temperature on the knob.

As the oven heats, the thermocouple reads the temperature. Then the temperature gets to 350 + 10F, it will stop heating. As the oven cools, it will continue reading the temperature. When the temperature gets to 350 - 10F, it will turn back on and heat until it hits 350 + 10F. And so and so on and so on.

The oven is never really "at" 350F except in passing through on the way up and down, but it averages 350F over the course of the baking period.

Barry


"Alan" wrote in message ...
i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone could give me the infos?
thanks
alan
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2003, 04:02 PM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get replacement
parts if it is not working.
there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks

"Jenn Ridley" wrote in message
...
"Alan" wrote:

i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone could

give me the infos?
thanks


A gas oven works by burning natural gas (or propane, if it's a propane
stove).

When you turn on the oven, a valve opens, and the gas starts flowing.
An electric ignitor lights the gas. A thermostat tracks the
temperature, and when it gets high, the gas turns off, and when the
temperature gets low, the gas turns back on again (just like a
furnace).

Some older gas ovens have a pilot light instead of an electric ignitor
(a small flame is always burning below the oven floor, and when the
gas is turned on, it ignites). Some really old gas ovens don't have
any kind of internal ignitor at all, and need to be lit with a match.

jenn
--
Jenn Ridley



"barry" wrote in message
et...
Pretty simple device.

There is a piece in the oven that measures temperature, call it a
thermometer.
There is a connection between the thermometer and the gas supply, the gas
valve.
There is a temperature control knob on the front.
There is an on-off method built into the oven. This is controlled by the
control mechanism.

Here's how it works.

You set the temperature and turn the oven on. Say you set it to 350F.

The gas valve opens and the gas ignites, whether by pilot light,
electronic ignition or match.

The oven burns some gas and the oven heats.

As the oven heats, the oven thermometer measures the temperature and
reports that back to the control mechanism.

The control mechanism is set to respond to a range around the temperature
you set. It will go on at a temperature slightly below what you set and off
at a temperature slightly above the temperature you set. In this instance,
let's say that it is set at 10F above and below the temperature on the knob.

As the oven heats, the thermocouple reads the temperature. Then the
temperature gets to 350 + 10F, it will stop heating. As the oven cools, it
will continue reading the temperature. When the temperature gets to 350 -
10F, it will turn back on and heat until it hits 350 + 10F. And so and so
on and so on.

The oven is never really "at" 350F except in passing through on the way up
and down, but it averages 350F over the course of the baking period.

Barry



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2003, 09:37 PM
Pennyaline
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

"Alan" wrote:
Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get replacement
parts if it is not working.


The temperature probe is in your oven attached to (probably) the rear wall
near the oven's ceiling. When the thermostat fails, it is likely due to a
failure of the probe. You can get replacement parts, but it's best to go
through a good appliance dealer or repair service to get the work done.
Sometimes, it's more efficient to replace the stove.


there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks


Electric stoves have upper elements in the oven box that serve as broilers.
Gas stoves have broilers in the compartment below the oven, where the fire
for the oven is already situated. Sometimes the broilers are at the top of
the stove, where the gas units of the cooktop have been designed to do
double duty. I can't imagine why else you would want an "upper burner" on a
gas stove.

Would I DIY a gas stove? NO! Your gas appliance connections might have to
pass a safety inspection before the gas supply can be turned on, and if
you're jiggering your own appliances you may be setting yourself up for gas
leaks or explosion and fire risks.


"Jenn Ridley" wrote in message
...
"Alan" wrote:

i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone could

give me the infos?
thanks


A gas oven works by burning natural gas (or propane, if it's a propane
stove).

When you turn on the oven, a valve opens, and the gas starts flowing.
An electric ignitor lights the gas. A thermostat tracks the
temperature, and when it gets high, the gas turns off, and when the
temperature gets low, the gas turns back on again (just like a
furnace).

Some older gas ovens have a pilot light instead of an electric ignitor
(a small flame is always burning below the oven floor, and when the
gas is turned on, it ignites). Some really old gas ovens don't have
any kind of internal ignitor at all, and need to be lit with a match.

jenn
--
Jenn Ridley



"barry" wrote in message
et...
Pretty simple device.

There is a piece in the oven that measures temperature, call it a
thermometer.
There is a connection between the thermometer and the gas supply, the

gas
valve.
There is a temperature control knob on the front.
There is an on-off method built into the oven. This is controlled by

the
control mechanism.

Here's how it works.

You set the temperature and turn the oven on. Say you set it to 350F.

The gas valve opens and the gas ignites, whether by pilot light,
electronic ignition or match.

The oven burns some gas and the oven heats.

As the oven heats, the oven thermometer measures the temperature and
reports that back to the control mechanism.

The control mechanism is set to respond to a range around the

temperature
you set. It will go on at a temperature slightly below what you set and

off
at a temperature slightly above the temperature you set. In this

instance,
let's say that it is set at 10F above and below the temperature on the

knob.

As the oven heats, the thermocouple reads the temperature. Then the
temperature gets to 350 + 10F, it will stop heating. As the oven cools,

it
will continue reading the temperature. When the temperature gets to 350 -
10F, it will turn back on and heat until it hits 350 + 10F. And so and so
on and so on.

The oven is never really "at" 350F except in passing through on the way

up
and down, but it averages 350F over the course of the baking period.

Barry







  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-12-2003, 05:48 AM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven


"Alan" wrote in message
...
Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get replacement
parts if it is not working.


The thermostat is an electric device. You can probably buy one and install
it yourself, if you have the manual or can get it online and you can find
the part. If you can't do this, you'll have to buy the part and have it
installed for you. I have done this on electric ovens, when it's just a
matter of replacing a burned-out element or thermostat. On the other hand,
electricity isn't explosive and electric equipment isn't as stringently
covered by various Building Codes as is gas equipment. ("I smell gas." is
the surest way to get a bunch of people off their duffs and into your house
pronto. when was the last time anyone said "I smell electricity?")

The part will probably cost about $30 and the service call will be around
$100, both plus tax. Total cost around $150, just as a guess. As an
example, I remember the heating element on a Thermador electric oven cost
around $50 and took about a half-hour to replace.

I have 38 gas stoves with ovens and 4 325,000BTU boilers. I do not do any
of my own gas-unit repairs, even though I am a very good mechanic, at least
on automobiles and other machinery. By the nature of your questions, I
assume you are not a qualified mechanic or contractor.

I also do not repair gas ovens. I replace the stove when the oven fails. I
figure that fixing an oven is just wasting money. A gas oven has a service
life of 10-20 years, depending on use and quality, so if it fails after 12
years, that's it. We buy good quality, reliable stoves and spend anywhere
from $325 to $500. (30", 4 burners, standard oven with broiler, pilot light
or electronic ignition).

As for modifying an oven to add a broiler, forget it. There are so many
possible Building or Municipal Code violations here that I can't even begin
to list them. If you buy a new gas stove/oven, make sure that your
installation meets your local Code.

Barry


there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks




  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-12-2003, 05:36 PM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

how does the thermostat control the gas valve when tempreture overshot?
the reason i asked for the upper gas burner(element)is bcos some baking need
upper tempreture more than lower temppreture,in electric oven you can have
seperated upper or lower element,but in gas oven case,how can we get it?
I was told that industrial/commercial gas oven does have upper and lower
burner element,is that right?cos i haven't seen one like that before.
i feel that gas oven tends to generate more moisture(gas?)than electric
type(tends to be dry type)and resulting of different
quality for the baked product.
is the any book or web site i can learn more about gas oven?
thanks

"Pennyaline" wrote in
message ...
"Alan" wrote:
Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get replacement
parts if it is not working.


The temperature probe is in your oven attached to (probably) the rear wall
near the oven's ceiling. When the thermostat fails, it is likely due to a
failure of the probe. You can get replacement parts, but it's best to go
through a good appliance dealer or repair service to get the work done.
Sometimes, it's more efficient to replace the stove.


there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks


Electric stoves have upper elements in the oven box that serve as

broilers.
Gas stoves have broilers in the compartment below the oven, where the fire
for the oven is already situated. Sometimes the broilers are at the top of
the stove, where the gas units of the cooktop have been designed to do
double duty. I can't imagine why else you would want an "upper burner" on

a
gas stove.

Would I DIY a gas stove? NO! Your gas appliance connections might have to
pass a safety inspection before the gas supply can be turned on, and if
you're jiggering your own appliances you may be setting yourself up for

gas
leaks or explosion and fire risks.


"Jenn Ridley" wrote in message
...
"Alan" wrote:

i'd like to know how's the gas oven works?any web site or someone

could
give me the infos?
thanks

A gas oven works by burning natural gas (or propane, if it's a propane
stove).

When you turn on the oven, a valve opens, and the gas starts flowing.
An electric ignitor lights the gas. A thermostat tracks the
temperature, and when it gets high, the gas turns off, and when the
temperature gets low, the gas turns back on again (just like a
furnace).

Some older gas ovens have a pilot light instead of an electric ignitor
(a small flame is always burning below the oven floor, and when the
gas is turned on, it ignites). Some really old gas ovens don't have
any kind of internal ignitor at all, and need to be lit with a match.

jenn
--
Jenn Ridley



"barry" wrote in message
et...
Pretty simple device.

There is a piece in the oven that measures temperature, call it a
thermometer.
There is a connection between the thermometer and the gas supply, the

gas
valve.
There is a temperature control knob on the front.
There is an on-off method built into the oven. This is controlled by

the
control mechanism.

Here's how it works.

You set the temperature and turn the oven on. Say you set it to 350F.

The gas valve opens and the gas ignites, whether by pilot light,
electronic ignition or match.

The oven burns some gas and the oven heats.

As the oven heats, the oven thermometer measures the temperature and
reports that back to the control mechanism.

The control mechanism is set to respond to a range around the

temperature
you set. It will go on at a temperature slightly below what you set and

off
at a temperature slightly above the temperature you set. In this

instance,
let's say that it is set at 10F above and below the temperature on the

knob.

As the oven heats, the thermocouple reads the temperature. Then the
temperature gets to 350 + 10F, it will stop heating. As the oven cools,

it
will continue reading the temperature. When the temperature gets to

350 -
10F, it will turn back on and heat until it hits 350 + 10F. And so and

so
on and so on.

The oven is never really "at" 350F except in passing through on the

way
up
and down, but it averages 350F over the course of the baking period.

Barry







  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-12-2003, 05:43 PM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

how does the thermostat control the gas valve when tempreture overshot?
the reason i asked for the upper gas burner(element)is bcos some baking need
upper tempreture more than lower temppreture,in electric oven you can have
seperated upper or lower element,but in gas oven case,how can we get it?
I was told that industrial/commercial gas oven does have upper and lower
burner element,is that right?cos i haven't seen one like that before.
i feel that gas oven tends to generate more moisture(gas?)than electric
type(tends to be dry type)and resulting of different
quality for the baked product.
is the any book or web site i can learn more about gas oven?
thanks

"barry" wrote in message
t...

"Alan" wrote in message
...
Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get replacement
parts if it is not working.


The thermostat is an electric device. You can probably buy one and

install
it yourself, if you have the manual or can get it online and you can find
the part. If you can't do this, you'll have to buy the part and have it
installed for you. I have done this on electric ovens, when it's just a
matter of replacing a burned-out element or thermostat. On the other

hand,
electricity isn't explosive and electric equipment isn't as stringently
covered by various Building Codes as is gas equipment. ("I smell gas." is
the surest way to get a bunch of people off their duffs and into your

house
pronto. when was the last time anyone said "I smell electricity?")

The part will probably cost about $30 and the service call will be around
$100, both plus tax. Total cost around $150, just as a guess. As an
example, I remember the heating element on a Thermador electric oven cost
around $50 and took about a half-hour to replace.

I have 38 gas stoves with ovens and 4 325,000BTU boilers. I do not do

any
of my own gas-unit repairs, even though I am a very good mechanic, at

least
on automobiles and other machinery. By the nature of your questions, I
assume you are not a qualified mechanic or contractor.

I also do not repair gas ovens. I replace the stove when the oven fails.

I
figure that fixing an oven is just wasting money. A gas oven has a

service
life of 10-20 years, depending on use and quality, so if it fails after 12
years, that's it. We buy good quality, reliable stoves and spend anywhere
from $325 to $500. (30", 4 burners, standard oven with broiler, pilot

light
or electronic ignition).

As for modifying an oven to add a broiler, forget it. There are so many
possible Building or Municipal Code violations here that I can't even

begin
to list them. If you buy a new gas stove/oven, make sure that your
installation meets your local Code.

Barry


there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks






  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-12-2003, 06:47 PM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default gas oven

My experience and observations are that the lower element does most of the
work in both gas and electric. The upper element in an electric oven is for
broiling and, maybe, preheating. In the gas ovens we have, the lower burner
does the work, while the upper burner is for broiling.

The thermostat controls the gas valve by shutting it off and turning it
on -- shutting off the flow of gas, thereby turning the oven off, and
restoring the flow of gas, thereby allowing the oven to turn on. Both types
of ovens operate in on or off mode, there is no such thing as an oven that's
"on low." When an oven is on low, it is set for a low average temperature.

I'm not aware of any recipes that require upper or lower heating, except for
broiling.

I know nothing about industrial gas ovens. I've used and managed very large
electric annealing ovens, but those were used in temperature ranges of 1300F
and annealed brass and copper by the ton.

As for the moisture generated by the gas oven as opposed to the "dry" heat
of an electric oven, I wouldn't worry about it. You'll probably find that
the moisture released by the baking process itself overwhelms the bit of
moisture generated by burning gas, and that the gas-generated moisture
dissipates rapidly. This will undoubtedly start a thread/flame from those
who will claim that the amount of moisture is significant, since I remember
a thread recently that pounded this topic to death, but it's not worth
thinking about.

As for a web site or book, I haven't looked for any. You might try a google
search on oven gas control and see what pops up. You could also check out a
boiler manufacturer, ours is Slant Fin, and see what they have in the way of
discussion. The principles of an oven and a gas-fired boiler are identical.

Not to belabor a point, which I am, but we have 4 boilers in series with a
computer control that fires them in sequence. The control process works by
measuring the ambient (outside) temperature. It the ambient is above 60F,
nothing happens. If the ambient is below 60F, then the controller measures
the ambient and the discharge water from the boiler. It checks the
temperature set on the control panel and the control band. There is another
control, one that moves the set temperature up and down by a ratio, but
let's not get too confused here.

Consider an ambient of 25F (today's temp), a base water temperature of 110F
and a band of 3F. These are my conditions today.

The control program is set to raise the temperature of the water to the base
water temperature plus 70F minus the ambient. Today, this works out to 110
+70 - 25 = 155F. The control band is the tolerance within which the
discharge water must be maintained. I have a temperature gauge on the
discharge pipe and a temperature gauge on each boiler on the discharge side.
I know that in this temperature range, one boiler will be sufficient to
raise the total water flow by about 10F, which is about the temperature drop
between output and input; one boiler will, therefore, just about maintain
the desired temperature under these conditions.

So, when the water temperature falls to 155 minus half the band, or 155
minus 1.5 degrees or 153.5, the boilers start to come on or fire. They will
go on, one at a time, and continue to come of in sequence and to fire until
the water temperature hits 155 plus 1.5, or 156.5F. Then they will start to
shut off, the first to fire will shut off first. There is a 2 minute lag
built into the firing and shutting off process to allow the system time to
stabilize.

A kitchen oven works the same way, except that it has only one heating
element. There is a desired temperature, a control band, and a mechanism
for turning the heat on and off.

Barry

"Alan" wrote in message
...
how does the thermostat control the gas valve when tempreture overshot?
the reason i asked for the upper gas burner(element)is bcos some baking

need
upper tempreture more than lower temppreture,in electric oven you can have
seperated upper or lower element,but in gas oven case,how can we get it?
I was told that industrial/commercial gas oven does have upper and lower
burner element,is that right?cos i haven't seen one like that before.
i feel that gas oven tends to generate more moisture(gas?)than electric
type(tends to be dry type)and resulting of different
quality for the baked product.
is the any book or web site i can learn more about gas oven?
thanks

"barry" wrote in message
t...

"Alan" wrote in message
...
Thanks for your advise:
my gas oven heat up to the tempreture according to the preset heat,but
sometimes when it overshot,the gas burner still fire
and never went down,i wonder is the thermostat still in proper

function?
where can find the thermostat from the oven,where can i get

replacement
parts if it is not working.


The thermostat is an electric device. You can probably buy one and

install
it yourself, if you have the manual or can get it online and you can

find
the part. If you can't do this, you'll have to buy the part and have it
installed for you. I have done this on electric ovens, when it's just a
matter of replacing a burned-out element or thermostat. On the other

hand,
electricity isn't explosive and electric equipment isn't as stringently
covered by various Building Codes as is gas equipment. ("I smell gas."

is
the surest way to get a bunch of people off their duffs and into your

house
pronto. when was the last time anyone said "I smell electricity?")

The part will probably cost about $30 and the service call will be

around
$100, both plus tax. Total cost around $150, just as a guess. As an
example, I remember the heating element on a Thermador electric oven

cost
around $50 and took about a half-hour to replace.

I have 38 gas stoves with ovens and 4 325,000BTU boilers. I do not do

any
of my own gas-unit repairs, even though I am a very good mechanic, at

least
on automobiles and other machinery. By the nature of your questions, I
assume you are not a qualified mechanic or contractor.

I also do not repair gas ovens. I replace the stove when the oven

fails.
I
figure that fixing an oven is just wasting money. A gas oven has a

service
life of 10-20 years, depending on use and quality, so if it fails after

12
years, that's it. We buy good quality, reliable stoves and spend

anywhere
from $325 to $500. (30", 4 burners, standard oven with broiler, pilot

light
or electronic ignition).

As for modifying an oven to add a broiler, forget it. There are so many
possible Building or Municipal Code violations here that I can't even

begin
to list them. If you buy a new gas stove/oven, make sure that your
installation meets your local Code.

Barry


there is no upper burner(upper fire)for this gas oven,can i make one

for
myself?how to do it and where can i get parts?
any web site can teach to diy a gas oven?
thanks










Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Changing from Electric Oven to Convection Gas oven The Henchman[_3_] General Cooking 10 05-10-2010 08:42 PM
Whirloop oven strange behavior of oven lights [email protected] General Cooking 1 08-05-2005 04:47 PM
HELP! Oven Door stuck on Dacor W 305 Convection Oven Dee Randall Cooking Equipment 2 26-12-2004 10:02 PM
HELP! Oven Door stuck on Dacor W 305 Convection Oven guitarlee Cooking Equipment 1 25-12-2004 11:45 PM
Which size cast iron Dutch Oven? (for use in oven, not camping) Mike Cooking Equipment 7 15-02-2004 05:57 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:26 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017