Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-03-2009, 09:12 PM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4
Default Bread dough never gets "smooth and silky" after needing

I have been making bread 2-3 times a week for about a month, and no matter
how long I knead the dough (tried for 30 minutes last night) it never
becomes smooth and silky. It did not bother me until just recently because
the dough DOES become smooth and silky after the first rise when it gets
punched down. But I was making noodles (or trying to) and the directions
said to knead the heck out of the dough. It said to knead it until it is
smooth and silky, and then 10 minutes more. I used all purpose flour for
this, and it did become smooth. Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?

Any ideas on how to go from lumpy and torn to smooth and silky?

Thanks!
Paul


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-03-2009, 09:51 PM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 638
Default Bread dough never gets "smooth and silky" after needing

On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 14:12:46 -0700, "Paul"
wrote:

I have been making bread 2-3 times a week for about a month, and no matter
how long I knead the dough (tried for 30 minutes last night) it never
becomes smooth and silky. It did not bother me until just recently because
the dough DOES become smooth and silky after the first rise when it gets
punched down. But I was making noodles (or trying to) and the directions
said to knead the heck out of the dough. It said to knead it until it is
smooth and silky, and then 10 minutes more. I used all purpose flour for
this, and it did become smooth. Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?

Any ideas on how to go from lumpy and torn to smooth and silky?

Thanks!
Paul


Hi Paul,

The thing that you are leaving out of the equation is
time...

I would suggest that you try this:

Mix up some dough, but mix it only to the point that you are
certain that you have left no pockets of dry flour.

Then, put the dough in the refrigerator for a few hours.

Finally, take it out and knead it.

Also, you mention bread flour by saying:

"Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?"

but the answer is "No."

Higher gluten flours (often called "bread flour") is slower
to fully hydrate, and also needs more water to bring it to a
particular texture.

Because it hydrates more slowly than would lower protein
flour, it will take longer to form a smooth dough.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-03-2009, 03:55 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4
Default Bread dough never gets "smooth and silky" after needing


"Kenneth" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 14:12:46 -0700, "Paul"
wrote:

I have been making bread 2-3 times a week for about a month, and no matter
how long I knead the dough (tried for 30 minutes last night) it never
becomes smooth and silky. It did not bother me until just recently
because
the dough DOES become smooth and silky after the first rise when it gets
punched down. But I was making noodles (or trying to) and the directions
said to knead the heck out of the dough. It said to knead it until it is
smooth and silky, and then 10 minutes more. I used all purpose flour for
this, and it did become smooth. Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?

Any ideas on how to go from lumpy and torn to smooth and silky?

Thanks!
Paul


Hi Paul,

The thing that you are leaving out of the equation is
time...

I would suggest that you try this:

Mix up some dough, but mix it only to the point that you are
certain that you have left no pockets of dry flour.

Then, put the dough in the refrigerator for a few hours.

Finally, take it out and knead it.

Also, you mention bread flour by saying:

"Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?"

but the answer is "No."

Higher gluten flours (often called "bread flour") is slower
to fully hydrate, and also needs more water to bring it to a
particular texture.

Because it hydrates more slowly than would lower protein
flour, it will take longer to form a smooth dough.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


I have no doubt that this would work because the dough does get smooth after
rising for an hour. Is this a quirk of my enviroment, flour or recipe; or
should I be doing this every time I make any bread? If it is a moisture
absorbtion issue, could it be that it is because I live in an extremely dry
area (phoenix)?

Thanks!

Paul

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-03-2009, 11:40 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 638
Default Bread dough never gets "smooth and silky" after needing

On Tue, 10 Mar 2009 20:55:41 -0700, "Paul"
wrote:


"Kenneth" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 14:12:46 -0700, "Paul"
wrote:

I have been making bread 2-3 times a week for about a month, and no matter
how long I knead the dough (tried for 30 minutes last night) it never
becomes smooth and silky. It did not bother me until just recently
because
the dough DOES become smooth and silky after the first rise when it gets
punched down. But I was making noodles (or trying to) and the directions
said to knead the heck out of the dough. It said to knead it until it is
smooth and silky, and then 10 minutes more. I used all purpose flour for
this, and it did become smooth. Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?

Any ideas on how to go from lumpy and torn to smooth and silky?

Thanks!
Paul


Hi Paul,

The thing that you are leaving out of the equation is
time...

I would suggest that you try this:

Mix up some dough, but mix it only to the point that you are
certain that you have left no pockets of dry flour.

Then, put the dough in the refrigerator for a few hours.

Finally, take it out and knead it.

Also, you mention bread flour by saying:

"Bread flour has more gluten so it should
come together better than AP flour, right?"

but the answer is "No."

Higher gluten flours (often called "bread flour") is slower
to fully hydrate, and also needs more water to bring it to a
particular texture.

Because it hydrates more slowly than would lower protein
flour, it will take longer to form a smooth dough.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


I have no doubt that this would work because the dough does get smooth after
rising for an hour. Is this a quirk of my enviroment, flour or recipe; or
should I be doing this every time I make any bread? If it is a moisture
absorbtion issue, could it be that it is because I live in an extremely dry
area (phoenix)?

Thanks!

Paul


Hi Paul,

I don't know with certainty, but it would seem possible that
your flour, stored in such a dry environment, takes longer
to fully hydrate than it might in a more humid area.

But, whatever the cause, you are likely to get better
results by just slowing it all down.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PICs: Silky smooth mashed spuds I'm back on the laptop General Cooking 104 10-03-2012 06:50 AM
"NESTLE's Cookie Dough Is As Good As We Say It Is," Says Swiss-BasedChocolate Maker! Lykmi Pusi Baking 3 10-07-2009 10:15 PM
"NESTLE's Cookie Dough Is As Good As We Say It Is," SaysSwiss-Based Chocolate Maker! atadhorny General Cooking 0 10-07-2009 10:15 PM
REQ: Smooth Deviled Egg "Innards" Christine Dabney General Cooking 53 26-12-2006 11:09 PM
Reporting back: Question regarding keeping "Old Dough" NewCulStudent Sourdough 3 21-11-2005 01:01 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017