Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 18-11-2003, 01:06 AM
PatyD
 
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Default Holiday Treats for Diabetics...

My daughter and I would like to make holiday treats for my mom whose
diabetic, but loves desserts -- does anyone have a receipe (cookies,
cakes or loafs) with or w/o frosting.

Please advise.

Thanks!

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Old 18-11-2003, 03:17 AM
Karen
 
Posts: n/a
Default Holiday Treats for Diabetics...

"PatyD" wrote in message
om...
My daughter and I would like to make holiday treats for my mom whose
diabetic, but loves desserts -- does anyone have a receipe (cookies,
cakes or loafs) with or w/o frosting.

Please advise.

Thanks!


I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes last year, and one of the things I
learned was this: Nothing is off-limits to diabetics; the key is
moderation. It was once thought that sugar was *the* main problem for
diabetics. It's not - it's carbohydrates that affect our blood glucose
levels, and sugar is just one type of carb. A baked potato has the same
effect on our blood sugar as a brownie, and fruit can spike our blood sugar
as much as a candy bar can. That being said, the American Diabetes
Association revised its guidelines in 1994 to allow sugar in diabetic meal
plans, as long as it's factored into the carb count for the meal plan. For
example, if someone is allowed 30 grams of carbohydrate per meal, they could
have a teaspoon of sugar, which is 4 carbs, in their coffee or tea if they
wanted. That would leave them 26 carbs for the rest of their meal.

Baked goods, even if sugar-free, are usually high in carbohydrates because
the flour alone is a major source of carbs. So the key here is small
servings, worked into an individual's meal plan.

There are many diabetic and low-carb recipe sites; you can use a search
engine to find them. Here are a couple you can check out:
http://www.lowcarbeating.com/recipe_..._name=Desserts

http://www.splenda.com/page.jhtml;js...es/library.inc
(scroll down to "Desserts" category)

If your mother likes cheesecake, here's a recipe I've had great success
with:

CHEESECAKE

1 cup Splenda granular (or 24 packets) (do not use Equal or other aspartame
sweetener, as the sweetness breaks down and becomes bitter in the baking
process)
2 tablespoons sifted cornstarch
4 8-oz. packages Philadelphia fat-free cream cheese, softened (do not use
store brand, as the taste and texture are inferior)
1 large egg
1/2 cup fat-free half and half
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Preheat the oven to 350. Generously butter the bottom and sides of a 8-
or 9-inch springform pan.

2. In a large bowl, combine the Splenda and the cornstarch. Beat in the
cream cheese. Beat in the egg. Slowly drizzle in the half and half, beating
constantly. Add the vanilla and stir well. Pour (spread) the mixture into
the prepared pan. Bake until the top is golden, 45 to 55 min. (Top will
crack, but this doesn't affect taste or texture.) Cool in the pan on a wire
rack for 3 hrs. Remove springform collar; refrigerate.

Serves 8 very generously.

144 calories and 12 grams of carbohydrate per serving.

I hope this is helpful to you.

Karen








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Old 18-11-2003, 01:25 PM
Lori
 
Posts: n/a
Default Holiday Treats for Diabetics...

On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 03:17:34 GMT, "Karen"
wrote:

snip

If your mother likes cheesecake, here's a recipe I've had great success
with:

CHEESECAKE


snip

Karen omitted the crust on the cheesecake - it's one of the major
sources of carbohydrates in a cheesecake. If you want a crust, try
using a nut crust.

Mix crushed nuts with some Splenda and cinnamon to taste, stir in some
melted butter or margarine that bakes well until if forms a dough like
texture, press it into the pan and bake it at 375 or so until it's
browned. It won't get a crunchy as a graham cracker crust will, but
it will add a new flavor to your cheesecake.

If the mixture is too crumbly, try adding a little bit of soy flour.
You can find it at health food stores and some major grocery stores
carry it. It has much fewer carbohydrates than wheat flour does.

____

Lori
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Old 28-11-2003, 05:02 PM
PatyD
 
Posts: n/a
Default Holiday Treats for Diabetics...

"Karen" wrote in message news:[email protected]_s02...
"PatyD" wrote in message
om...
My daughter and I would like to make holiday treats for my mom whose
diabetic, but loves desserts -- does anyone have a receipe (cookies,
cakes or loafs) with or w/o frosting.

Please advise.

Thanks!


I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes last year, and one of the things I
learned was this: Nothing is off-limits to diabetics; the key is
moderation. It was once thought that sugar was *the* main problem for
diabetics. It's not - it's carbohydrates that affect our blood glucose
levels, and sugar is just one type of carb. A baked potato has the same
effect on our blood sugar as a brownie, and fruit can spike our blood sugar
as much as a candy bar can. That being said, the American Diabetes
Association revised its guidelines in 1994 to allow sugar in diabetic meal
plans, as long as it's factored into the carb count for the meal plan. For
example, if someone is allowed 30 grams of carbohydrate per meal, they could
have a teaspoon of sugar, which is 4 carbs, in their coffee or tea if they
wanted. That would leave them 26 carbs for the rest of their meal.

Baked goods, even if sugar-free, are usually high in carbohydrates because
the flour alone is a major source of carbs. So the key here is small
servings, worked into an individual's meal plan.

There are many diabetic and low-carb recipe sites; you can use a search
engine to find them. Here are a couple you can check out:
http://www.lowcarbeating.com/recipe_..._name=Desserts

http://www.splenda.com/page.jhtml;js...es/library.inc
(scroll down to "Desserts" category)

If your mother likes cheesecake, here's a recipe I've had great success
with:

CHEESECAKE

1 cup Splenda granular (or 24 packets) (do not use Equal or other aspartame
sweetener, as the sweetness breaks down and becomes bitter in the baking
process)
2 tablespoons sifted cornstarch
4 8-oz. packages Philadelphia fat-free cream cheese, softened (do not use
store brand, as the taste and texture are inferior)
1 large egg
1/2 cup fat-free half and half
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Preheat the oven to 350. Generously butter the bottom and sides of a 8-
or 9-inch springform pan.

2. In a large bowl, combine the Splenda and the cornstarch. Beat in the
cream cheese. Beat in the egg. Slowly drizzle in the half and half, beating
constantly. Add the vanilla and stir well. Pour (spread) the mixture into
the prepared pan. Bake until the top is golden, 45 to 55 min. (Top will
crack, but this doesn't affect taste or texture.) Cool in the pan on a wire
rack for 3 hrs. Remove springform collar; refrigerate.

Serves 8 very generously.

144 calories and 12 grams of carbohydrate per serving.

I hope this is helpful to you.

Karen



Happy Thanksgiving Karen!

And thank you for sharing your informative message and receipe! We
didn't get a change to try the cheesecake yesterday -- but will for
Christmas. The ingredients works for everyone!!!

Pat
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Old 28-11-2003, 05:07 PM
PatyD
 
Posts: n/a
Default Holiday Treats for Diabetics...

Lori wrote in message . ..
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 03:17:34 GMT, "Karen"
wrote:

snip

If your mother likes cheesecake, here's a recipe I've had great success
with:

CHEESECAKE


snip

Karen omitted the crust on the cheesecake - it's one of the major
sources of carbohydrates in a cheesecake. If you want a crust, try
using a nut crust.

Mix crushed nuts with some Splenda and cinnamon to taste, stir in some
melted butter or margarine that bakes well until if forms a dough like
texture, press it into the pan and bake it at 375 or so until it's
browned. It won't get a crunchy as a graham cracker crust will, but
it will add a new flavor to your cheesecake.

If the mixture is too crumbly, try adding a little bit of soy flour.
You can find it at health food stores and some major grocery stores
carry it. It has much fewer carbohydrates than wheat flour does.

____

Lori


*************
Thank you Lori! Is there any specific type of nuts I should use?

Pat


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