Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 03:16 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

I am a glutton for punishment because I started 4 more starters since I
can't do anything until Tuesday, when I get my new yeast Monday -- we live
in the sticks.

1) all purpose with sugar
2) all purpose without sugar
3) bread flour with sugar
4) bread flour without sugar

I'll tell you when I put thepictures of them on-line.
Thanks,
Dee


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
It's now 9 am and the starter has set 16 hours and hasn't raised or

lowered
any since last night. There may be a few more holes this morning. It

will
not flow out to the side easily. But it has that wine smell that I don't
like. Sometimes I get this smell when cooking bread; it smell horrid to

me.
But I threw it out this test. . I will make another test today using a
pinch of sugar with this current yeast. Then I will l buy a new batch of
yeast Monday and make another test Monday. The yeast I'm using is active
dry -- I think it's Fleischman's from Costco. I open a large bag and put

it
in Ball jars in the refrigerator. Perhaps it's been in there too long.

But
buying a new bag is the thing to do at this time.

Thanks for looking at my yeast.
I have more questions, but will ask when I'm up and around a little more.
Dee





"barry" wrote in message
et...
Dee,

The ciabatta and pizza look perfect to me.

No, I did not use any sugar in my starters. Your starter doesn't look

too
bad from what I can tell. Mine, at roughly 65% hydration, will flow

slowly
if I tilt the container on its side. They both give off a good, clean,
yeasty smell. I'd say you probably have weak yeast, but that's a guess.
You might try adding a pinch of sugar to the starter and stirring it up

a
bit. This might kick start the yeast.

I'm not sure whether being old yeast affects the number of cells in the
process or the strength of each cells or both. Somewhere I read that

yeast
colonies double every two hours. So, if that's the case, one would

expect
weak yeast to "catch up" in some period of time, say two hours. In

other
words,you would need a head start of two hours to get the volume and
activity with the old yeast that you would get with the fresh yeast. I
don't know if this is correct, or if it's even generalizable.

Barry


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
OK Barry, my test did not have sugar in it, and as you say yours did

not
have sugar in it -- correct?

Well, mine is sitting here at 21:46 and it has since 16:50 (5 hours),

room
temperature now about 70.5 degrees, just about doubled in size and

has
very
few holes in it. Now, my container lid is quite strong and when I

popped
(pryed) it off, it let out a lot of air. But I would say, that the

yeast
is probably not as good as it should be.
I've put a picture of the starter as it is now at 10:00 pm on a web

page
so
you can see it.
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Give me your "sage" advice.
Dee


"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed

at
me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above

your
test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested

it
without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test
tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee
I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every

twenty
to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4

ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic

container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry












  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 08:05 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

OK, I finished with the starters. I itemized them well and said how long it
took for the lids to pop or not to pop.
You can see them at
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Thanks for any comments.
Dee




"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
I am a glutton for punishment because I started 4 more starters since I
can't do anything until Tuesday, when I get my new yeast Monday -- we live
in the sticks.

1) all purpose with sugar
2) all purpose without sugar
3) bread flour with sugar
4) bread flour without sugar

I'll tell you when I put thepictures of them on-line.
Thanks,
Dee


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
It's now 9 am and the starter has set 16 hours and hasn't raised or

lowered
any since last night. There may be a few more holes this morning. It

will
not flow out to the side easily. But it has that wine smell that I

don't
like. Sometimes I get this smell when cooking bread; it smell horrid to

me.
But I threw it out this test. . I will make another test today using a
pinch of sugar with this current yeast. Then I will l buy a new batch

of
yeast Monday and make another test Monday. The yeast I'm using is

active
dry -- I think it's Fleischman's from Costco. I open a large bag and

put
it
in Ball jars in the refrigerator. Perhaps it's been in there too long.

But
buying a new bag is the thing to do at this time.

Thanks for looking at my yeast.
I have more questions, but will ask when I'm up and around a little

more.
Dee





"barry" wrote in message
et...
Dee,

The ciabatta and pizza look perfect to me.

No, I did not use any sugar in my starters. Your starter doesn't look

too
bad from what I can tell. Mine, at roughly 65% hydration, will flow

slowly
if I tilt the container on its side. They both give off a good,

clean,
yeasty smell. I'd say you probably have weak yeast, but that's a

guess.
You might try adding a pinch of sugar to the starter and stirring it

up
a
bit. This might kick start the yeast.

I'm not sure whether being old yeast affects the number of cells in

the
process or the strength of each cells or both. Somewhere I read that

yeast
colonies double every two hours. So, if that's the case, one would

expect
weak yeast to "catch up" in some period of time, say two hours. In

other
words,you would need a head start of two hours to get the volume and
activity with the old yeast that you would get with the fresh yeast.

I
don't know if this is correct, or if it's even generalizable.

Barry


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
OK Barry, my test did not have sugar in it, and as you say yours

did
not
have sugar in it -- correct?

Well, mine is sitting here at 21:46 and it has since 16:50 (5

hours),
room
temperature now about 70.5 degrees, just about doubled in size and

has
very
few holes in it. Now, my container lid is quite strong and when I

popped
(pryed) it off, it let out a lot of air. But I would say, that the

yeast
is probably not as good as it should be.
I've put a picture of the starter as it is now at 10:00 pm on a web

page
so
you can see it.
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Give me your "sage" advice.
Dee


"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed

at
me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where

above
your
test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested

it
without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will

re-test
tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee
I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every
twenty
to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4
ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic
container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry













  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-11-2003, 11:59 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Thank you Roy for your thoughtful answer.
Your answer was a little above my expertise, but I'm sure others will
benefit from it as well.
My best,
Dee

"Roy Basan" wrote in message
om...
"Dee Randall" wrote in message

...
Does anyone make the breads in Carol Field's book that are made with

bigas
or poolish that include such a minimal amount of yeast for the biga,

with
absolutely no extra yeast added when making the dough with the biga. I
have had failures on everyone of these recipes. Can anyone help?

Dee

I am not familiar with Carols book.
But your question is related to bakery expereince .
Old time bakers usually use very little yeast when making
preferments.And if you use that fermented sponge or biga, you will
need to subject the mixed dough( the biga already in it) to bulk
fermentation for a one to a few hours before you cut it down for
rounding and molding operation.
That is if the biga or poolish use a flour which is just a quarter or
a third of the total flour used.
If you apply this system like a normal dough where you just give it a
short rest after mixing then divide and mold ,the proofing will be
long and the dough appears squat lookin,close grained and with less
volume.
Another efficient way to use it is make the biga from 60-70% of the
flour and ferment that well.
Then when the ferment is ripe( it recedes from the fermentation
container) add the remaining flour with the rest of the ingredients
and make a dough.
Give it a floor time of 15-30 minutes then divide it into pieces,
round the dough let it rest for 15 minutes then mold.
Proof properly and bake.
Making biga and poolish with little yeast in it demands that it
should be fermented well.
The yeast level will be in the range of 0.25-0.5% fresh yeast basis.
Some of these new instant yeast do not have fermentation tolerance as
fresh yeast.
Therefore if you apply long fermentation of your biga with little
yeast use the standard compressed yeast as that was designed for such
fermentation process.
Using a rapid rise yeast and many instant yeast will usually result
in poor performance as instant yeast was designed for the modern fast
breadmaking process.It does not have much tolerance to long
fermentation.
Roy





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book Serene Vannoy General Cooking 22 06-07-2008 08:23 PM
A Successful Bread from Carol Field Boron Elgar[_1_] General Cooking 3 12-03-2008 01:33 PM
Good bread is back - newish book Dick Adams[_1_] Sourdough 0 15-07-2007 07:46 PM
How to make rotis (Indian flat bread), paratha (layered flat bread), and other Indian breads... Amanda General Cooking 3 01-01-2007 07:23 PM
Starter - Biga Recipes? Kent Baking 1 18-06-2006 03:32 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017