Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 09-11-2003, 09:50 PM
Deepak Saxena
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?
I ask b/c I seem to have left my packet open and it's now an unusuable
brick. Can I replace it with something else?

~Deepak


--
Deepak Saxena - - http://www.plexity.net

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Old 09-11-2003, 10:55 PM
H. W. Hans Kuntze
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

Deepak Saxena wrote:

What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?

Does not go rancid in storage and is easier to handle than milk

I ask b/c I seem to have left my packet open and it's now an unusuable
brick. Can I replace it with something else?
=20

Replace the milk powder and some of the water with an appropriate=20
quantity of low-fat or no-fat milk.
You can also crush your "unuseable brick" and dissolve it, use it.

--=20
Sincerly,

C=3D=A6-)=A7 H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com ,
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/=20

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Old 09-11-2003, 11:18 PM
Deepak Saxena
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

In article ,
H. W. Hans Kuntze wrote:


Deepak Saxena wrote:

What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?

Does not go rancid in storage and is easier to handle than milk


Tnx; however, let me rephrase my question. What chemical purpose does
it (or milk) serve in the dough? The whole wheat breads I buy at
the store just have ww flour, honey, yeast, water, salt but most
of the recipes I've found include dried milk. Why?

Replace the milk powder and some of the water with an appropriate=20
quantity of low-fat or no-fat milk.
You can also crush your "unuseable brick" and dissolve it, use it.


That seems to work. Tnx!

~Deepak


--
Deepak Saxena - - http://www.plexity.net
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Old 10-11-2003, 12:49 AM
H. W. Hans Kuntze
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

Deepak Saxena wrote:

In article ,
H. W. Hans Kuntze wrote:
=20

Deepak Saxena wrote:

=20

What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?

=20

Does not go rancid in storage and is easier to handle than milk
=20


Tnx; however, let me rephrase my question. What chemical purpose does
it (or milk) serve in the dough? The whole wheat breads I buy at
the store just have ww flour, honey, yeast, water, salt but most
of the recipes I've found include dried milk. Why?

Commercial breads are usually produced as cheaply as possible.

Milk powder adds proteins, makes for better crust color, increases=20
keeping quality, nutrition, better texture of the crumb.

A commercial bakery/bread factory will try to achieve that as cheaply as =

possible, by selecting flours and through the addition of chemicals,=20
enzymes, etc.

Just add the milk powder.

If they add honey, then only in minute amounts, it adds marketing appeal.=

Personally I think molasses is better, but has no marketing appeal.

If you don't want to use milk powder, just leave it out and see if you=20
like the product as well.
If not, put it in again the next time. No big deal.

Personally, I like a whole wheat bread with it better than without,=20
makes better toast, better texture.

--=20
Sincerly,

C=3D=A6-)=A7 H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com ,
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/=20

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Old 10-11-2003, 04:34 AM
Roy Basan
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

(Deepak Saxena) wrote in message ...
In article ,
H. W. Hans Kuntze wrote:


Deepak Saxena wrote:

What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?


It is not that critical in whole wheat bread loaves.You can make white
or whole wheat bread with just flour,salt, yeast and water...
In general in relation to doughmaking...
Milk is considered an enriching ingredient, it is also functional due
to its buffering effect and therefore dough that contains milk does
not become sour easily on overfermentation if compared to milk free
bread.
Milk contains lactose that contributes to crust browning during
baking.
the protein in skim milk also binds the gluten due to its calcium
content and the protein will interact with the wheat protein in a
minor way contributing to slightly to improvement of shelf life by
slightly delaying the staling rate.
Milk powder will bind more water so it will increase the moisture
content of the bread and that can be interpretted that softer bread
stales slower than tough lean bread.

the proteolytic enzymes in the dough can modify some of the milk
protein releaseing amino acids that are good flavor precursors during
the Maillards reaction in the baking process.
So the bread taste better with added milk.
Nutritionally the high protein in NFDM will improve the bread
quality.
Therefore this skim milk powder is advantageous if added to bread
dough what ever the flour used: whole or white flour.
Roy


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Old 10-11-2003, 06:14 AM
Anton S.
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

I was also wondering this same question. I've been using a bagel
recipe that called for dry milk powder. I searched though these
groups for awhile and found out that the milk powder is supposed to
create a tighter crumb. I think the premis behind it is there are
still living enzymes in the milk powder that break down the gluten (I
think) so the weakend structure can't support the big bubbles in the
dough. Makes sense for bagels since you want a dense bagel. Not sure
what style of wheat bread your making, and there might be other
reasons for it.

Hope this helps...

Anton


(Deepak Saxena) wrote in message ...
What is the purpose of non-fat dry milk in whole wheat loaves?
I ask b/c I seem to have left my packet open and it's now an unusuable
brick. Can I replace it with something else?

~Deepak

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Old 12-11-2003, 01:30 AM
Mark Floerke
 
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Default Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?

The Old Bear is correct in his factoids. In Jewish dietary rules Bagels are
what is know and Pareve, so it can be eaten with meat or dairy. Fish is
also Pareve - Bagel with Lochs and cream cheese works you see, but not
pastrami and cream cheese :-)
The skim mil powder fat or not adds protein to the structure and is also a
natural emulsifier to disperse any fat in the recipe. It also aids in the
browning of the crust, richer flavour, and as mentioned softer crumb.
Replace it? Mono diglycerides, sodium stearoyl lactelate, lecithin and/or
egg yolk and sugar or malt or diastatic malt flour.

Mr Pastry
"The Old Bear" wrote in message
news
(Anton S.) writes:

From:
(Anton S.)
Newsgroups: rec.food.baking
Subject: Non-fat dry-milk...purpose?
Date: 9 Nov 2003 22:14:41 -0800

I was also wondering this same question. I've been using a bagel
recipe that called for dry milk powder. I searched though these
groups for awhile and found out that the milk powder is supposed to
create a tighter crumb. . . . Makes sense for bagels since you
want a dense bagel. . . .


My understanding is that non-fat dry milk is used in place of
skim milk or whole milk to produce a "softer" product. The
ubiquitous commercial "squshy white bread" was originally known
as a milk bread for this reason.

Dry milk handles well, stores easily, is inexpensive, and is
"reconstituted" by the water in the recipe.

But authentic bagels would never be made with any milk or dairy
products because of traditional Jewish dietary laws which forbid
milk to be eaten with meat. It would be too hard to determine
whether one had a dairy bagel or a non-dairy bagel, so bagels
-- like most Jewish baked goods -- are made only with water and
vegetable shortening (if any) and not milk and butter.

If you like making bagels with milk, be all means do so -- they
may be delicious. But just don't consider them authentic.

Cheers,
The Old Bear





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