Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 08-04-2007, 08:41 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


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Old 09-04-2007, 01:14 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

On Sun, 08 Apr 2007 12:41:18 -0700, JimL wrote:

What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


You could try 'bark' or coating chocolate. I see it in the local mega-mart.



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Old 09-04-2007, 06:32 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

On Apr 8, 12:41 pm, "JimL" wrote:
What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


Couverature, but that needs tempering. Try your chips again, and be
sure not to overheat. Also, don't add other stuff to it to try to
thicken. Or if flavor isn't too important to you, then I would
recommend bark, also.

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Old 10-04-2007, 07:47 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?



"Merryb" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Apr 8, 12:41 pm, "JimL" wrote:
What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


Couverature, but that needs tempering. Try your chips again, and be
sure not to overheat. Also, don't add other stuff to it to try to
thicken. Or if flavor isn't too important to you, then I would
recommend bark, also.


why not leave the chips unadulterated. melt and drizzle on cookie, let harden.
should be firm like the chips but not rock break teeth breaking hard. That's
what I do when i want to dip the ends of biscotti in chocolate and it is good.

--
Laura

-Sautéed poo is still poo!

Come join us at The Dirty Old Ladies and The Dirty Old Men!
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheDirtyOldLadies/


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Old 10-04-2007, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

you can put the chocolate chips in a glass measuring cup (make sure
it's dry, or the chocolate can seize, that's nasty stuff). Melt a
little, stir, melt again, then drizzle on your cookies. Put the
cookies in the fridge for a short time and the chocolate will harden.
I've done this with biscotti.


What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies?




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Old 10-04-2007, 09:53 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

"Laura" ) writes:
"Merryb" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Apr 8, 12:41 pm, "JimL" wrote:
What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


Couverature, but that needs tempering. Try your chips again, and be
sure not to overheat. Also, don't add other stuff to it to try to
thicken. Or if flavor isn't too important to you, then I would
recommend bark, also.


why not leave the chips unadulterated. melt and drizzle on cookie, let harden.
should be firm like the chips but not rock break teeth breaking hard. That's
what I do when i want to dip the ends of biscotti in chocolate and it is good.

I think because the original poster is not satisfied with the state of the
chocolate after melting.

This is subjective, but it seems after making thousands of chocolate chip
cookies over a decade, some brands of chocolate chips are better at reverting
to their "natural" state. I tended to buy the cheapest, and then decided
the chips were staying too "gooey". It seems better with a more expensive
brand.

I'm also willing to believe it might not be the chips, but something else
in the process that is providing some variant, though I couldn't say
what. I've made the same recipe enough that the variants that I used
to see are long gone.

Commercial chocolate chip cookies have a relatively firm chip, and
they generally don't melt too badly in your fingers while you eat them.

I think that's what the poster is asking about, because after melting
the chocolate chips, they stay too soft and thus it's too messy in your
hands.

Michael

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Old 10-04-2007, 09:55 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

"Marge" ) writes:
you can put the chocolate chips in a glass measuring cup (make sure
it's dry, or the chocolate can seize, that's nasty stuff). Melt a
little, stir, melt again, then drizzle on your cookies. Put the
cookies in the fridge for a short time and the chocolate will harden.
I've done this with biscotti.

Does it turn to a state where it remains relatively "hard" when back
to room temperature?

Michael


What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies?




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Old 10-04-2007, 11:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?



"Michael Black" wrote in message
...
"Laura" ) writes:
"Merryb" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Apr 8, 12:41 pm, "JimL" wrote:
What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?

Couverature, but that needs tempering. Try your chips again, and be
sure not to overheat. Also, don't add other stuff to it to try to
thicken. Or if flavor isn't too important to you, then I would
recommend bark, also.


why not leave the chips unadulterated. melt and drizzle on cookie, let
harden.
should be firm like the chips but not rock break teeth breaking hard. That's
what I do when i want to dip the ends of biscotti in chocolate and it is
good.

I think because the original poster is not satisfied with the state of the
chocolate after melting.

This is subjective, but it seems after making thousands of chocolate chip
cookies over a decade, some brands of chocolate chips are better at reverting
to their "natural" state. I tended to buy the cheapest, and then decided
the chips were staying too "gooey". It seems better with a more expensive
brand.

I'm also willing to believe it might not be the chips, but something else
in the process that is providing some variant, though I couldn't say
what. I've made the same recipe enough that the variants that I used
to see are long gone.

Commercial chocolate chip cookies have a relatively firm chip, and
they generally don't melt too badly in your fingers while you eat them.

I think that's what the poster is asking about, because after melting
the chocolate chips, they stay too soft and thus it's too messy in your
hands.

Michael


I've used gently in the microwave melted regular chips - think i used Kroger
brand to dip the ends of biscotti in with much success. kept them cool ( to
room temp) it sets up and then store in a tightly sealed container. I think
all chocolate chip i have used returns to a more solid state when cooled after
warming to liquid state. Chocolate chips r the easiest thing to work with. Any
brand i think..

--
Laura

-Sautéed poo is still poo!

Come join us at The Dirty Old Ladies and The Dirty Old Men!
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheDirtyOldLadies/


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Old 10-04-2007, 11:42 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

On 10 Apr 2007 12:46:38 -0700, "Marge" wrote:

you can put the chocolate chips in a glass measuring cup (make sure
it's dry, or the chocolate can seize, that's nasty stuff). Melt a
little, stir, melt again, then drizzle on your cookies. Put the
cookies in the fridge for a short time and the chocolate will harden.


Or, if you want to avoid differing effects due to varying ingredients in
different brands of chocolate chips, just use straight dark choclate and chop it
coarsely before melting.

There's no particular reason to use chips if you're going to melt the chocolate
anyway.

-- Larry
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Old 11-04-2007, 03:18 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

no, it just saves you the trouble of having to chop chocolate

There's no particular reason to use chips if you're going to melt the chocolate
anyway.

-- Larry





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Old 14-04-2007, 03:36 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

Marge wrote:
no, it just saves you the trouble of having to chop chocolate

There's no particular reason to use chips if you're going to melt the chocolate
anyway.

-- Larry



But the chocolate IS different in chip form. It has things added to it
to keep it's shape when baking. They aren't as easy to work with when
melted because they don't have the cocoa butter that hard, block
chocolates have. That would make a difference in dipping cookies or
candies.

Melondy
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Old 14-04-2007, 04:48 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

Melondy ) writes:
Marge wrote:
no, it just saves you the trouble of having to chop chocolate

There's no particular reason to use chips if you're going to melt the chocolate
anyway.

-- Larry



But the chocolate IS different in chip form. It has things added to it
to keep it's shape when baking. They aren't as easy to work with when
melted because they don't have the cocoa butter that hard, block
chocolates have. That would make a difference in dipping cookies or
candies.

Melondy


I had to go back and reread the original post, because I thought there
had been a good reason for the chips.

When I was a kid, I had a cookbook aimed at the young, with fun sorts
of simple things you could make. And one entry in there was a means
of easily icing a cake. Take the cake out of the oven, and while it's
still hot or warm (I forget which), you'd sprinkly chocolate chips
over it. The heat of the cake would melt them, and you'd just spread it
around so it was even.

And I thought that was the case here, until I went back and read the
part about melting the chocolate chips separate.

And at that point, I am lost. You don't need to chop up chocolate if
you are melting it, it merely takes a bit longer.

Michael

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Old 16-04-2007, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

On Apr 10, 3:53 pm, (Michael Black) wrote:
"Laura" ) writes:
"Merryb" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Apr 8, 12:41 pm, "JimL" wrote:
What kind of chocolate, and method, should I use to make a simple
chocolate to drizzle on top of otherwise plain sugar cookies? I've
tried melting Nestle's chips in a double boiler, added some powdered
sugar, and then a bit of cornstaarch to try to thicken it. It was too
runny, and when cooled still didn't harden enouch -- cookies in a jar
would stick to each other. Is there a cerain kind of chocolate for
melting and then hardening?


Couverature, but that needs tempering. Try your chips again, and be
sure not to overheat. Also, don't add other stuff to it to try to
thicken. Or if flavor isn't too important to you, then I would
recommend bark, also.


why not leave the chips unadulterated. melt and drizzle on cookie, let harden.
should be firm like the chips but not rock break teeth breaking hard. That's
what I do when i want to dip the ends of biscotti in chocolate and it is good.


I think because the original poster is not satisfied with the state of the
chocolate after melting.

This is subjective, but it seems after making thousands of chocolate chip
cookies over a decade, some brands of chocolate chips are better at reverting
to their "natural" state. I tended to buy the cheapest, and then decided
the chips were staying too "gooey". It seems better with a more expensive
brand.

I'm also willing to believe it might not be the chips, but something else
in the process that is providing some variant, though I couldn't say
what. I've made the same recipe enough that the variants that I used
to see are long gone.

Commercial chocolate chip cookies have a relatively firm chip, and
they generally don't melt too badly in your fingers while you eat them.

I think that's what the poster is asking about, because after melting
the chocolate chips, they stay too soft and thus it's too messy in your
hands.

Michael- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Ed Zachary


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Old 19-04-2007, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What chocolate to melt?

Michael Black wrote:
Melondy ) writes:
Marge wrote:
no, it just saves you the trouble of having to chop chocolate

There's no particular reason to use chips if you're going to melt the chocolate
anyway.

-- Larry

But the chocolate IS different in chip form. It has things added to it
to keep it's shape when baking. They aren't as easy to work with when
melted because they don't have the cocoa butter that hard, block
chocolates have. That would make a difference in dipping cookies or
candies.

Melondy


I had to go back and reread the original post, because I thought there
had been a good reason for the chips.

When I was a kid, I had a cookbook aimed at the young, with fun sorts
of simple things you could make. And one entry in there was a means
of easily icing a cake. Take the cake out of the oven, and while it's
still hot or warm (I forget which), you'd sprinkly chocolate chips
over it. The heat of the cake would melt them, and you'd just spread it
around so it was even.

And I thought that was the case here, until I went back and read the
part about melting the chocolate chips separate.

And at that point, I am lost. You don't need to chop up chocolate if
you are melting it, it merely takes a bit longer.

Michael



It is almost always best to chop chocolate to melt it because then it
melts quicker and thus cooler, closer to being tempered. If you chop all
your chocolate, melt about half of it, stir to finish to a smooth melted
mass and then add the rest of your chopped chocolate and stir...you are
simulating tempering. The 'fresh' chocolate will melt slowly and absorb
alot of the heat, lowering the temperature and tempering your chocolate.
Then your chocoalte will again have that shine and snap like before you
melted and "un"tempered it.

Melondy


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