Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 16-02-2007, 07:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

Bruce Fletcher wrote:

Relax chaps! It's only a pizza (or sausage or whatever)


Bruce, old chap, 'tis but a smidgeon of misunderstanding, a tiniest hint
of a disagreement, but otherwise a veritable brotherly, sisterly and
motherly (in-law) love-fest. 'tis not as if we were discussing
something really serious, like chili, Alfredo sauce, curry, boiled
barbecued ribs, or Stroganoff (all of which, BTW, are identical - to
pizza and to each other).

Victor

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Old 16-02-2007, 10:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Pig's trotters (was Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.)

Bruce Fletcher wrote:

Boiled barbecued ribs - sounds almost as tasty as the pig's trotters and
cow-heel we used to get from the UCP (United Cattle Products) shop in
Manchester when I was about 10. Mind you their tripe was delicious g


Pig's trotters are actually wonderful. It is interesting that they are
often cooked exactly the way ribs shouldn't - first they are braised,
then grilled. I wonder if they can be slowly barbecued (in the southern
USA sense of the word) instead.

Classic French recipes, mostly variations on the Sainte-Ménéhould theme,
call for braising them on low heat for up to ten hours. Front trotters
are considered much superior to hind ones. In order to prevent them
from falling apart during such a long cooking, they are individually
wrapped in linen cloth and tied with twine. Then they are slowly
braised, covered, together with vegetables, white wine, and spices, for
a long time. Then they are unwrapped, smothered with butter and rolled
in breadcrumbs. Then they are slowly grilled. Serve with rémoulade or
béarnaise, or just with mustard. Very tasty.

Or you can make pieds de cochon farcis au foie gras...

Victor
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Old 16-02-2007, 10:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

Alan wrote:

(Victor Sack) wrote:

Alan wrote:

(Victor Sack) wrote:

Is it a good idea to follow the example of those people? The same
people also call raw, unformed minced/ground meat either "hamburger or
"sausage",


No, you equated "hamburger" and "sausage" -- two different
food items.


I think you are unable to read and to grasp a simple argument, as
illustrated above.

Are you really trying to convince *me* that "hamburger" and "sausage"
are supposed to be different? What a hoot!

Are you even aware of what I am - and have been - talking about?

It would be "unseasoned minced meat in casings" or ground
meat, but not sausage.


Not that this really matters, but here, again, is a dictionary
definition:

*** noun 1 a short tube of raw minced meat encased in a skin, that is
grilled or fried before eating.


No mention of seasonings.

Only in America. Did you actually read my post? Did you comprehend it?


And... did you?

These are, by the way, rhetorical questions, so just re-read the
paragraph you quoted below - about the yet another example of the
general supplanting the particular in the American version of English.


Does not the above, repeated twice, give you any idea of what I am
really talking about?

*** noun 1 a person studying at a university or other place of higher
education. 2 chiefly N. Amer. a school pupil. 3 before another noun
denoting someone who is studying to enter a particular profession: a
student nurse. 4 a person who takes a particular interest in a subject.


Uh. Did you notice definition #2. A school pupil.
No age or other specification.


No, I guess it *is* futile to even try to argue with you. You keep
arguing with yourself or with some imaginary opponent, no matter what I
say.

Well, Victor, your facts are mostly disputable, and you are
obviously more willing to argue than deal in facts.


You have yet to present a single fact for me to deal with, and a single
evidence of why my facts (and which ones) are disputable. No surprise,
since you are unable to even understand what it is I am really talking
about.

And you seem to hold yourself above the rest for being able
to express your questionable knowledge.


The "rest" being you, presumably? I suspect you are the only one
overwhelmed by my oh-so-superior expression in my poor, non-native
English.

Snot. Snob.


You are unable to even follow a simple line of thought and so you resort
to calling people names. Very nice. How do your parents react, or used
to react, to such behaviour, I wonder?

It's one thing to be a snob. It is another to be snotty
about it by still standing by expressing "knowledge" which
is not particularly true, or by continuing to declaim your
own, very proscribed definitions of what something is.
Pizza, for example.


Physician, heal thyself!

To paraphrase Russ Allbery, if you were projecting any more, you could
rent yourself out as a cinema.

Victor


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Old 17-02-2007, 03:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Pig's trotters

In article ,
(Victor Sack) wrote:

Bruce Fletcher wrote:

Boiled barbecued ribs - sounds almost as tasty as the pig's trotters and
cow-heel we used to get from the UCP (United Cattle Products) shop in
Manchester when I was about 10. Mind you their tripe was delicious g


Pig's trotters are actually wonderful. It is interesting that they are
often cooked exactly the way ribs shouldn't - first they are braised,
then grilled. I wonder if they can be slowly barbecued (in the southern
USA sense of the word) instead.

Classic French recipes, mostly variations on the Sainte-Ménéhould theme,
call for braising them on low heat for up to ten hours. Front trotters
are considered much superior to hind ones. In order to prevent them
from falling apart during such a long cooking, they are individually
wrapped in linen cloth and tied with twine. Then they are slowly
braised, covered, together with vegetables, white wine, and spices, for
a long time. Then they are unwrapped, smothered with butter and rolled
in breadcrumbs. Then they are slowly grilled. Serve with rémoulade or
béarnaise, or just with mustard. Very tasty.

Or you can make pieds de cochon farcis au foie gras...

Victor


They make a wonderful stock.

I pressure cook them for 50 minutes.

I'll have to try wrapping them to keep them from splitting and falling
apart next time. Thanks for the idea!

I really do love those things and have been jonesing for them lately.
When I eat more trotters (and phoenix claws), my fingernails grow in
stronger and don't tend to split as much. My hair grows faster too.

I presume it's the collagen content.
Supposed to be good for osteoarthritis too.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 18-02-2007, 08:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 01:29:58 GMT, "Roughrider50"
wrote:

I was stationed in Berlin in the 60's & there was a gesthaus across the
street from my compound that had the best pizza I have ever
eaten........Add
to that the best beer I've ever drank, & the bockwurst that's out of this
world, not to mention Kartoffelsalat & Ochsenschwanzsuppe....


I think all those things have improved with age (yours -- and mine). 8

And besides, the best ochsenschwanzsuppe was clearly at der Roter Ochsen
in
Heidelberg.

I also remember pop-top bottles of wonderful fresh beer (Weldebrau)
magically
appearing on my doorstep every morning.

But I sure don't remember good pizza in Germany. France, yes; Holland,
yes;
Italy, yes; but not Germany.

-- Larry (owned the Army's Berlin trains in the '60s, and spent a lot of
time
there...)


Well I doubt if the pizza could be called classic by the purists here but it
tasted great, which is all that matters. They had some kind of peppers on
them that made it stand out. If memory serves me right it was about a block
down the street from Andrews barracks.
As far as the Army trains in Berlin(AKA Duty train) that was one of my
assignments.As a radio operator I'd ride the duty train to Helmstadt turn
around after a brief layover & return. Pretty interesting, especially when
we'd stop in Magdeburg to show our documents to the Russians. Got a lot of
good souvenirs that way ).




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