Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 06-11-2003, 04:10 PM
Your Name
 
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Default Pizza baking

Hello,=20

I have been making my own pizzas for a while know, but do not understand =
why some recipes say to let the dough rise twice? Why is this??

Also, I can achieve a very good thin crust pizza base, by rolling it =
out, but cannot get a good crust on it. Can anyone surgess some thing?

Thank you.

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Old 06-11-2003, 05:00 PM
Eric d'Entremont
 
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Default Pizza baking


Question: ---"I have been making my own pizzas for a while know, but do not
understand why some recipes say to let the dough rise twice? Why is it ?
Answer ------The reason for this is two fold... Without seeing the recipe I
assume that you kneaded the dough twice as well therefore you have to let
the gluten relax again, as well as letting the yeast work it's
magic

Question -----Also, I can achieve a very good thin crust pizza base, by
rolling it out, but cannot get a good crust on it. Can anyone surgess some
thing?
Answer ------Again there's two very simple procedures that I use in order to
get a good crust after many attempts....
1) Use a "smokin" oven ( 450 degree F)
2) Get a pizza stone, they're not expensive and heat
that stone in your "smokin" oven for about 30 mins before you add the raw
pizza to it..

I hope that these suggestions are of some use to you

Happy Eating

Eric


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Old 06-11-2003, 07:37 PM
barry
 
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Default Pizza baking


"Your Name" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hello,

I have been making my own pizzas for a while know, but do not understand why
some recipes say to let the dough rise twice? Why is this??

The first rise is to develop the dough. The second rising is done after
scaling but before shaping and lets gas build up in the dough. Do not press
the dough to shape it, but rather stretch and pull the dough, being very
careful to keep as much of the air in the dough as possible, especially in
the rim.

Also, I can achieve a very good thin crust pizza base, by rolling it out,
but cannot get a good crust on it. Can anyone surgess some thing?

I don't understand the differentiation between crust one and crust two. I
assume you mean the crust that the sauce sits on and the rim. See above.
If you do roll out the dough, don't roll the rim, just let the rim dough
stay in the risen state.

Most pizza books these days say to have an oven at some heat just short of
an oxy-acetelyene torch. I find that something between 450 and 550 works
for me. You'll have to experiment with your dough, process and oven to see
what works for you. I also put the rack (with tiles) pretty near the bottom
of the oven, which allows the crust to brown and crisp nicely, which is how
I like pizza. You could use two racks, one low and the other high, and
start the process on one and shift to the other after a bit.

Barry

Thank you.


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Old 06-11-2003, 11:34 PM
Roy Basan
 
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Default Pizza baking

There are many available food service and institutional information
in the net about pizza crust and I will not dwell on that much ,such
as these:

http://www.honey.com/foodserv/recip/...thincrust.html
Even food companies have their own technical information about pizza
crusts
http://www.lallemand.com/BakerYeastN...S/2_1PIZZA.PDF
http://www.generalmills.com/gmflour/pformula.asp
Roy
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Old 14-11-2003, 04:48 AM
Dee Randall
 
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Default Pizza baking

I find my pizza crusts are better if I heat the stone for 45 minutes at
500-550 degrees. I cook my pizzas at this temperature. They take no time
to cook and they are thin, chewey and not limp.

Dee



"Eric d'Entremont" wrote in message
...

Question: ---"I have been making my own pizzas for a while know, but do

not
understand why some recipes say to let the dough rise twice? Why is it ?
Answer ------The reason for this is two fold... Without seeing the recipe

I
assume that you kneaded the dough twice as well therefore you have to let
the gluten relax again, as well as letting the yeast work it's
magic

Question -----Also, I can achieve a very good thin crust pizza base, by
rolling it out, but cannot get a good crust on it. Can anyone surgess some
thing?
Answer ------Again there's two very simple procedures that I use in order

to
get a good crust after many attempts....
1) Use a "smokin" oven ( 450 degree F)
2) Get a pizza stone, they're not expensive and heat
that stone in your "smokin" oven for about 30 mins before you add the raw
pizza to it..

I hope that these suggestions are of some use to you

Happy Eating

Eric






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