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Old 29-05-2004, 06:29 AM
June Moore
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.

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Old 30-05-2004, 01:00 AM
RLK
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

"June Moore" wrote in message
om...
Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.



It's either ground white pepper but mainly the taste comes from a
well-seasoned carbon steel wok. The term is "wok hei" -- I believe it
translates to "breath of the wok". Never scour a wok till it gleams. Let it
season over time to a dark nonstick patina.


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Old 31-05-2004, 08:50 AM
occupant
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

RLK wrote:
Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


It's either ground white pepper but mainly the taste comes from a
well-seasoned carbon steel wok. The term is "wok hei" -- I believe it
translates to "breath of the wok". Never scour a wok till it gleams. Let it season over time to a dark nonstick patina.


Absolutely, a seasoned wok, that along with a little ginger, garlic,
onion, shrimp, if you will, scrambled egg, if you will, soy sauce, sugar
and, of course, rice. I use a little black forest ham. Or you may also
add bbq pork. A handful of frozen peas is good, too. Perfect
everytime, morning, noon, or night. High heat tossing the mixture
against the wall of the hot wok constantly. Then serve and devour with
chopssticks.
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Old 31-05-2004, 10:11 AM
M&M
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?


On 31-May-2004, occupant wrote:

RLK wrote:
Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


It's either ground white pepper but mainly the taste comes from a
well-seasoned carbon steel wok. The term is "wok hei" -- I believe it
translates to "breath of the wok". Never scour a wok till it gleams.
Let it season over time to a dark nonstick patina.


Seasoning a pan is a trick that is difficult for many Americans. Our
culture demands hot soap and water. It takes a conscious effort to
simply deglaze with water, swish the sides and dump a wok, pan,
skillet, whatever, out and then leave it on the heat just long enough
to dry. There's no need to worry about biological contamination. After
the pan dries from direct heat, there is nothing left alive in it. This
works for stainless steel and anodized aluminum as well as for cast
iron or sheet iron. No kidding aside; I find it hard to keep soap away
from my wok and skillets. It takes a conscious effort every time I
use one of them. (Pennsylvania Dutch Yankee all the way
to the bone)


Absolutely, a seasoned wok, that along with a little ginger, garlic,
onion, shrimp, if you will, scrambled egg, if you will, soy sauce, sugar
and, of course, rice. I use a little black forest ham. Or you may also
add bbq pork.


It may be a little offbeat for this NG, but then again maybe not. I
generally
have a surplus of BBQ shredded meat on hand. This product is characterized
by a semi sweet smoky flavor. Used in moderation, it is an enjoyable
variation to a variety of asian recipies, particularly, fried rice.

A handful of frozen peas is good, too. Perfect
everytime, morning, noon, or night. High heat tossing the mixture
against the wall of the hot wok constantly. Then serve and devour with
chopssticks.

--
M&M ("When You're Over The Hill You Pick Up Speed")
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Old 31-05-2004, 10:56 AM
Gregory Toomey
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


I was going to ask the same thing thus week!

The Chinese fried rice her in Australia seems to have a yellowish colour &
not much soy sauce.

From observation
- use a short grain rice
- use a rice cooker, it produces far better rice
- msg IS a must to get the Chinese Restaurant taste
- they seem to have green peas, chopped ham/chinese barbecue pork, egg, &
small prawns as well. I've seen small dried prawns at the asian grocer.

Also see
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg.../-/0688146112/

gtoomey


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Old 02-06-2004, 06:52 AM
gkm
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


It might be that 'stale' cooked rice is used. At least, I have verified
that is the trick with the Western Indian version of fried rice or
Masala Bhaat.

--

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Old 02-06-2004, 03:16 PM
Don't POO POO the Messenger
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

gkm wrote:

June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.



It might be that 'stale' cooked rice is used. At least, I have verified
that is the trick with the Western Indian version of fried rice or
Masala Bhaat.

--

maybe lard
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Old 04-06-2004, 03:05 AM
G. G. Govindajaran
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

On Mon, 31 May 2004 09:11:05 GMT, "M&M"
wrote:

Seasoning a pan is a trick that is difficult for many Americans. Our
culture demands hot soap and water. It takes a conscious effort to
simply deglaze with water, swish the sides and dump a wok, pan,
skillet, whatever, out and then leave it on the heat just long enough
to dry.


This is true. I remember the hell that I had to pay when I washed
and scrubbed my West Virginia hillbilly granny's (now in her nineties)
cast iron skillet when I was living with her.
I didn't realize that in a couple of moments of cleanliness, I was
literally wiping out about hundred years (it was her mother's) of
flavor and culinary history and making the "frying pan" unusable!
It took her about a week of treating the pan with the "drippings" that
she still saves from bacon and sausage, to get the skillet back in
proper working order. She told me that it wasn't so much of
retreating the cast iron, but of what it was treated with.
Now that she is well in her declining years, I've asked her to leave
but one thing to me in her will--that skillet! I kid you not,
everything that is cooked in that skillet, tastes of Appalachia and
history. You can't buy that at Williams-Sonoma at any price.





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Old 04-06-2004, 04:29 AM
Arsenio Oloroso
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

This subject has come up a number of times in the past on AFA. I've come
to the conclusion that the answer to the question of how to reproduce
"restaurant" fried rice is impossible to answer. The reason: the
recipe for "proper" fried rice differs widely according to locality,
restaurant and who's doing the cooking.

As a youngster, I myself got accustomed to the way fried rice was cooked
at a couple of restaurants on the West Side of Chicago. I was
"imprinted."

But in other neighborhoods and other cities I've traveled to, I found
that the restaurant fried rice I had didn't taste quite the same. And
yet, I think people who've regularly eaten at these restaurants fully
believe that the dish served there is totally authentic.

Having once embarked on the quest to find THE recipe, I asked around and
posted the question on AFA. The answers I got ranged, IMO, from the
plausible to the absurd. But those who responded to me were convinced
that their suggestions were absolutely on target. They were imprinted
too--in their own ways.

But having incorporated some of these suggestions and experimented in
cooking the dish a number of ways, I now believe that I won't be able to
re-capture the exact taste of my childhood fried rice. There are too
many variables in the equation--the wok, the proportion of seasonings,
the ingredients blah blah.

So, I've developed my own recipe. It's close (maybe it'll get closer)
but not exactly the same as the dish I remember.


Apart from asking the chef at your favorite restaurant how he/she
prepares fried rice, I can only think that the only solution is to
develop an increasingly sensitive palate and to get better at guessing
what the ingredients are. What you may end up with is something perhaps
more sophisticzated than what's served up in your local Chinese takeout
restaurat.

For what it's worth, here's something I recently learned from an AFA
poster about cooking fried rice: Use thick soy sauce (available at ASian
grocery stores) instead of the widely available thin soy sauce. This
seems to coat the rice better and doesn't cause spattering in the wok
during cooking.

I don't know if this is the secret ingredient. I'm just suggesting it as
a point of further research.

OLY







June Moore wrote:
Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


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Old 04-06-2004, 06:22 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

On Mon, 31 May 2004 19:56:14 +1000, Gregory Toomey :
June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


I was going to ask the same thing thus week!

The Chinese fried rice her in Australia seems to have a yellowish colour &
not much soy sauce.


The yellow is just some tumeric added for color.
-at

From observation
- use a short grain rice
- use a rice cooker, it produces far better rice
- msg IS a must to get the Chinese Restaurant taste
- they seem to have green peas, chopped ham/chinese barbecue pork, egg, &
small prawns as well. I've seen small dried prawns at the asian grocer.

Also see
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg.../-/0688146112/

gtoomey



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Old 05-06-2004, 02:50 AM
slim
 
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Default what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?



gkm wrote:

June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


It might be that 'stale' cooked rice is used. At least, I have verified
that is the trick with the Western Indian version of fried rice or
Masala Bhaat.



Super hot peanut oil in a cast iron wok.

Whooooooooooooooshhhhh.

--

http://www.bushflash.com/thanks.html
"Bubba got a blowjob, BU$H screwed us all!" - Slim
http://www.worldmessenger.20m.com/weapons.html#wms
George "The AWOL President" Bush: http://www.awolbush.com/
WHY IRAQ?: http://www.angelfire.com/creep/gwbush/remindus.html
http://www.toostupidtobepresident.co...ickenhawks.htm


VOTE HIM OUT! November 4, 2004
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Old 06-06-2004, 07:47 PM
 
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Default BESTEST fried rice

Fried Rice:
Serves 4 to 6 as part of a multicourse meat.

2 large eggs
2 tsp. plus 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
6 ounces chinese barbecued pork, store-bought or homemade(optional)
3 cups cooked brown rice, cooled(white rice, ok)
1 cup frozen peas, thawed
1/3 cup finely minced scallions
1 tbsp. thin soy sauce
1 tsp. XO Sauce(optional)
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. ground white pepper


Fried Rice:

Lightly beat eggs. Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or skillet over
medium-high heat until hot but not smoking.
Add 2 teaspoons oil and beaten eggs, and cook 1 to 2 minutes, tilting the
pan so that the egg covers the surface as
thinly as possible to make a pancake. When the bottom is just beginning to
brown and the pancake is just set, transfer
to a cutting board. Allow pancake to cool slightly, then cut into
1/4-inch-wide, 2-inch-long strips. Cut barbecued pork
into 1/4-inch dice to make about 1 1/4 cups.

Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil and rice to wok, and stir-fry 2 to 3 minutes,
breaking up the rice to separate the grains,
until it is lightly coated with oil. Add the diced pork, peas, scallions,
and egg strips, and continue stir-frying 3 to 4 minutes,
or until rice is beginning to brown slightly. Add soy sauce, XO Sauce if
desired, salt, and pepper, and stir-fry 1 more minute,
or until well combined. Serve immediately.

as demonstrated by Grace Young, author of The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen,
on discovery channel.






From: (June Moore)
Organization:
http://groups.google.com
Newsgroups: alt.food.asian
Date: 28 May 2004 22:29:24 -0700
Subject: what is the secret ingredient for chinese fried rice?

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.


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Old 25-01-2012, 03:51 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don't POO POO the Messenger View Post
gkm wrote:

June Moore wrote:

Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.



It might be that 'stale' cooked rice is used. At least, I have verified
that is the trick with the Western Indian version of fried rice or
Masala Bhaat.

--

maybe lard
Bingo...we have a winner!
Lard gives a very rich and delicious flavor, and is used heavily in China/chinese restaurants.
I prefer to use bacon, rather than lard.

I also recommend getting a doggie bag for those visits to the steak house. Left-over steak makes for a delicious fried rice dish.
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Old 07-02-2012, 09:58 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by June Moore View Post
Anyone know the ingredient for the very unique taste/aroma for the
chinese fried rice that you eat at the chinese restaurant?
I've tried the sesamie oil but it does not taste like it.
The secret lies in the sauces that are used while preparing Chinese fried rice. The sauces are spicy and tasty.


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