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Old 02-12-2008, 12:33 AM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Clement Restaurant
621 Clement Street (between 7th & 8th Ave.)
San Francisco, California, USA

Clement Restaurant is a Chinese bakery on Clement Street in San
Francisco. They make the most delicious "deep fried puffs" which are
balls of fried dough filled with seasoned pork. You have to get them
while they're hot, though, so wait until you see them put a fresh
batch in the window display. Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them. They make the first
batch around 8am, so that's a good time to get them. They're only
$0.55 each and I can eat three or four of them.

Clement Restaurant sign:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3002/...d70ccd7f01.jpg

Front window:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3170/...a9f4d8f5e6.jpg

Deep fried puffs:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3009/...b162a4c34f.jpg

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Old 02-12-2008, 01:00 AM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

On Dec 1, 4:33*pm, wrote:
Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!

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Old 02-12-2008, 03:33 AM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

On Dec 1, 4:33*pm, wrote:
Clement Restaurant
621 Clement Street (between 7th & 8th Ave.)
San Francisco, California, USA

Clement Restaurant is a Chinese bakery on Clement Street in San
Francisco. *They make the most delicious "deep fried puffs" which are
balls of fried dough filled with seasoned pork. *You have to get them
while they're hot, though, so wait until you see them put a fresh
batch in the window display. *Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them. *They make the first
batch around 8am, so that's a good time to get them. *They're only
$0.55 each and I can eat three or four of them.

Clement Restaurant sign:http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3002/...d70ccd7f01.jpg

Front window:http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3170/...a9f4d8f5e6.jpg

Deep fried puffs:http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3009/...b162a4c34f.jpg



These are a basic staple at most Dim Sum places. Judging by the
picture, they are called "hom soy gau" (rough cantonese phonetic
pronunciation) Yes, they are good.
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Old 02-12-2008, 05:15 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Bob W. wrote:
On Dec 1, 4:33 pm, wrote:
Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!


The Brits have been doing it for decades with fish and chips. Newspaper
ink isn't soluble in oil in my experience.

-sw
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:48 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Yum! Newspaper ink!

The Brits have been doing it for decades with fish and chips.
Newspaper ink isn't soluble in oil in my experience.

-sw


It used to be. Newspaper ink used to be oil-based and would come off on
everything (including the hands of the reader). They switched to
rubber-based inks a while back, so now the ink stays on the paper. The
only drawback to the change that I know of is that the old ink used to
make a good glass polish - if you used newspapers to clean windows the
ink residue would make the glass really sparkle.


--
- Jeff Lichtman
Author, Baseball for Rookies
http://baseball-for-rookies.com/


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Old 02-12-2008, 10:10 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

"Jeffrey Lichtman" wrote in message
.. .
Yum! Newspaper ink!


The Brits have been doing it for decades with fish and chips.
Newspaper ink isn't soluble in oil in my experience.

-sw


It used to be. Newspaper ink used to be oil-based and would come off on
everything (including the hands of the reader). They switched to
rubber-based inks a while back, so now the ink stays on the paper.


Is that true of the Mercury News?
My hands get dirty reading the Sunday MN, but
not reading the Sunday SF Chronicle.

Going back to the British Fish 'n' Chips (or fish supper as
it was called in Scotland) I can't remember the food
ever contacting the newsprint -- I think there was a inner
layer of greaseproof paper. It has been over three decades,
so perhaps my memory is suspect.


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Old 02-12-2008, 10:33 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Bob W. wrote:
On Dec 1, 4:33 pm, wrote:

Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!


But if the newspaper is printed using soy ink, then it should be o.k.,
right?



- Peter
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Old 02-12-2008, 10:49 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)



Pete Fraser writes:

Going back to the British Fish 'n' Chips (or fish supper as
it was called in Scotland) I can't remember the food ever
contacting the newsprint -- I think there was a inner layer
of greaseproof paper.



That's the way Old Chelsea, that chip shop in San Francisco
that I've mentioned, used to do it. Which makes sense; any
appreciable amount of oil or grease would soak through the
newspaper pretty quickly.

http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-old-chelsea-san-francisco



Geoff

--
"Everybody wants to save the earth; nobody wants to
help Mom do the dishes." -- P.J. O'Rourke

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Old 03-12-2008, 03:03 AM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

In article ,
Jeffrey Lichtman wrote:

It used to be. Newspaper ink used to be oil-based and would come off on
everything (including the hands of the reader). They switched to
rubber-based inks a while back, so now the ink stays on the paper


You may have gotten that reversed. Google the topic. Most of America's
daily newspapers use soy-based inks. Wikipedia says over 95% do, and
other sources support the claim of "most" newspapers.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:31 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Geoff Miller wrote:
Pete Fraser writes:

Going back to the British Fish 'n' Chips (or fish supper as
it was called in Scotland) I can't remember the food ever
contacting the newsprint -- I think there was a inner layer
of greaseproof paper.


That's the way Old Chelsea, that chip shop in San Francisco
that I've mentioned, used to do it. Which makes sense; any
appreciable amount of oil or grease would soak through the
newspaper pretty quickly.


I thought that was the idea behind the newspaper - to absorb oil and
humidity and keep the stuff crispy.

Wiki is a little bit of help on the subject, but not much. It does say
there is usually an inner lining, but not necessarily greaseproof.
Ireland used just newspaper (no lining). But the use of newsprint has
eventually been banned in 1970's-90's in most countries.

-sw


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Old 03-12-2008, 04:42 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

Bob W. wrote:
On Dec 1, 4:33 pm, wrote:
Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!


Soy isn't that bad is it?
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:19 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

On Dec 2, 2:33*pm, Peter Lawrence wrote:
Bob W. wrote:
On Dec 1, 4:33 pm, wrote:


Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!


But if the newspaper is printed using soy ink, then it should be o.k.,
right?


The puffs were in a plastic bag. I meant wrap the whole thing up to
keep it warm. Then catch the 38 Geary bus to Arguello and transfer to
33 south to the Haight Street entrance to Golden Gate Park and walk to
Hippy Hill and and the puffs will still be warm and you can eat them
with all the hippies and freaks.
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:04 PM posted to ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Clement Restaurant in San Francisco (review)

On Dec 2, 9:15*am, Sqwertz wrote:
Bob W. wrote:
On Dec 1, 4:33 pm, wrote:
Fresh puffs are way too hot to eat, but
you can wrap them up in newspaper and they'll stay hot long enough for
you to go somewhere like the park to eat them.


Yum! Newspaper ink!


The Brits have been doing it for decades with fish and chips. Newspaper
ink isn't soluble in oil in my experience.

-sw


Yep, and does anyone remember Johnson's Tamales on Taraval (City) and
then later in Westlake? They used newspaper. We loved them so much and
knew that the newspaper kept the food warm and was recycling at its
earliest and finest.
Take care,
Julie


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