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Old 27-07-2005, 07:32 PM
Dee Randall
 
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"Pandora" wrote in message
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"Dee Randall" ha scritto nel messaggio
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"Pandora" wrote in message
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On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 10:52:35 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:

Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte. I
went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at 1300
at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned
with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to
make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for
this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy them
like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg

When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora




I would love a recipe. I have some wonderful sage in the garden that
would be perfect.

A cheese suggestion, too, please....Does this need to be a grated
cheese such as a Parmigiano or Pecorino? I wonder how a gorgonzola
would taste crumbled over the gnocchi?

Gorgonzola, IMHO, has a very hard taste, so it would cover delicacy of
this kind of Gnocchi. that's why they put over only butter and sage.
On the other hand, butter and sage, aren't so flavourful. Perhaps it
would go better a creamy sauce with walnuts, "Fontina" (a piedmontese
cheese), few milk to melt cheese and if you want few minced sausage.
Yes, I think i will do like this.
To make chestnut dumplings is very simple: boil 5-6 medium potatoes and
when they are soft, peel and squash them over the pastry board. Make an
hole inside. Then put in the hole two whole eggs and mix with potatoes.
At this point you can start to add chestnut flour. You must add flour
till the mixture is rather hard.
Then you take a piece of mixture (as big as a tennis ball) and roll it
over the floured pastry board (back and forth) with the hand's palms. It
should comes out a long snake of pastry ( about one centimeter of
diameter) that you will cut with a knife in little rectangle of about 2
centimeters lenght.
Put your Gnocchi on a big and floured tray (if you want you can froze
them with the tray, and when they are hard you can put in a freezer
container).
When the salted water boil (put in the water also 1-2 spoons of oil),
plunge gnocchi and mix a little (with a long spoon) only the first time.
Gnocchi are ready when they come on the surface.
This is what I will do next saturday. Then I will tell you, but if you
want to try before., you can follow this recipe.

Chestnut flour can easily be ordered online here in the US.

Is a fortune ))

Cheers
Pandora

"Fontina" (a piedmontese cheese),

I've been looking all over for this for perhaps 6 months (or more) and
can only find Wisconsin, Swedish and Danish Fontina. Nosiree, no Italian
Fontina.
Dee Dee


Ohhhhh! It's a very pity!!! And have you got french cheese? *Raclette* is
a very good cheese and very similar to fontina!
Pandora (

I believe I saw Raclette other day at Trader Joe's. I'll look for it.
I found at Wegman's a wonderful cheese I hadn't had in years, Morbier. For
those who don't know it
http://www.interfrance.com/en/fc/ga_la-fromagerie.html & stroll down to
'Morbier.' It was heaven.

Thanks for sending pictures of Switzerland -- I've only been there a few
times,. There is a place settled in West Virginia by the Swiss, called
Helvetia. People flock there in the summer for some sort of festival. It
is very remote and mountainous -- but, of course, not like Switzerland's
mountains.
Dee Dee