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Old 15-05-2013, 02:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
sf[_9_] sf[_9_] is offline
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Default What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?

On Tue, 14 May 2013 16:23:04 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

On May 14, 4:20*pm, Danny D wrote:
My kid and I am just learning how to cook, and I keep seeing these
recipes that call for "an egg".
*http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/...g/12981834.jpg


Use some common sense. Don't be so literal.

For example, we were making onion rings today and found this:http://www.bhg.com/recipes/how-to/co...-make-onion-ri...

Seems to me, except for the seasoning, the egg & milk aren't
any better or worse than equivalent amounts of water ... but
maybe I'm missing something.

QUESTION: What 'does' the egg actually do in these recipes?


You only have to ask one.


Looks like he has Julie-itis.

The egg is a binder. It causes the flour to stick to whatever is
dipped in the egg wash. Ever tried to get egg off a plate. It's
like glue.
That's it's purpose.


Doesn't egg also leaven/lighten the batter (make it poof up) when it
cooks? IMO, a very light, crispy (and barely there) tempura batter is
best for calamari and shrimp. I don't deep fry, but rice flour or
cornstarch seem like they would be the ideal "flour" to use for
tempura and tempura batter would work well for onion rings too.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.