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Old 01-03-2009, 04:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
PickyJaz PickyJaz is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 277
Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 1, 7:06*am, Omelet wrote:
If you do it, I hope it turns out well. *Of course, there are other
natural dyes aside from the onion skins and the cabbage.

Oh, what a great treat for my eldest grand daughter and her generation
to give to their Mom's already zealous Easter Day festivities. Each
year my daughter cooks big, and also plans the biggest easter egg hunt
(with prizes) ever, for not just her five twelve to twenty-three year
olds, but many of their friends as well. The three married "sets" of
grands are each having hard economic times, so this will be nice for
them to give back with. Thank you Om and Nancy, I've just "named" and
sent the following to the eldest gran, my Baker Babe, Tiara, and her
wannabe Chef husband....

We know what an Easter freak mom is, so here's something inexpensive
and you and Scott or your sisters can do for her. Surprise her the
day before Easter with setting a pretty bowl of these on her table.
Maybe even line the bowl with an entire bunch of fresh parsley....

Antique Easter Egg Dying

Start right now with saving the "paper" onion skins that it
takes to do this. Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with
cheese cloth and cotton string. Hard boil. Unwrap, let cool
and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite pretty. They come out marbled, sometimes
with striations from the skin pattern in yellow, orange and
rust colors.

Another lovely way to antique eggs is to wrap them in purple
cabbage leaves. No cheese cloth needed. String tie, or just
use rubber bands to fasten.

If you want to try the onion skins, get extra ones from the
grocery store. The onion bins always have plenty of extra
"shed" paper skins which are what you need.

Love you and of course I miss you BIG....Nana