Thread: Mold on cider
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Old 01-11-2007, 02:48 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
[email protected] doublesb@hotmail.com is offline
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Default Mold on cider

I'm not worried about the derision. What worries me is advice given
without any examples to back it up. Statements like " I wouldn't do
that" without a reason why just doesn't cut it. Reasons like "That
doesn't sound too appetizing" is not very scientific.

Bob

On Oct 31, 10:16 am, jim wrote:
Sadly there seems to be a degree of derision on this thread as well as
the useful opinions and information. The information is useful, the
derision is not.

I am not sure myself as to whether all byproducts of bacterial
spoilage are neutralised when the alcohol levels rise high enough to
kill the infection. I couldn't find much online about it and I don't
know whether many of these byproducts are poisonous either.
Information and opinion given by long-term winemakers on this thread
is interesting though and does help to form a strategy as well as
opinion.

I'd be interesting to hear more on this subject. Perhaps the lack of
testimony from people quoting a negative experience shows that there
is rarely a problem with procedures suggested. Perhaps it just shows
that they haven't read this thread yet.

Jim (a newb)

On Oct 31, 2:28 pm, wrote:

You can never have enough info. If she makes a decision based on the
limited info presented here, I will guarantee it will be an ill-
informed decision.


Bob


On Oct 30, 11:56 am, "Paul E. Lehmann" wrote:


wrote:
If you want to drink bad smelling "wine", be my
guest. If you want to risk contaminating other
things in your winery, go ahead. I am not the
wine police I am merely making suggestions.


I'm making suggestions myself based on my
observations and experiences combined with info
given to me by a good winemaker. I'm not
suggesting drinking bad stuff, I'm suggesting a
method to fix it.


"Sick, yes, deadly - life threatening ill no.
Of
course, to the best of my knowledge, I have
never drunk a low alcohol beverage that had
green mold
growing on it. To each his own. Happy wine -
errr - beverage making "


I haven't even heard of anyone getting sick.
Like I said, I'm suggesting ways to fix it not
ways to drink it.


I think Cathy has enough information to make her
decision.


"On Oct 26, 11:54 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
wrote:
The two Paul's in this thread would make good
Republican Presidential
candidates.


I would have to change my party affiliation
before I did that


Instilling IRRATIONAL FEAR into
anyone who ever came across mold or a bad
smelling wine.


If you want to drink bad smelling "wine", be my
guest. If you want to risk contaminating other
things in your winery, go ahead. I am not the
wine police I am merely making suggestions.


On the contrary, there are no
known pathogens that exist in wine.


I don't believe the "cider" had enough sugar to
make "wine". The words we


.."temp was bad and we had green mold on top of
the cider (just apple juice let to ferment by
itself, no yeast or other additives)."


It's the
reason the Board of Health exempts wineries
from reqiurements of section 20C. Has anyone
on this board heard of anyone getting sick
from bad wine? Anyone?


Sick, yes, deadly - life threatening ill no.
Of course, to the best of my knowledge, I have
never drunk a low alcohol beverage that had
green mold
growing on it. To each his own. Happy wine -
errr - beverage making


Frederick mentioned the push down
of the cap. Both Pauls have pushed those
"toxins" down into the wine hundreds of times
and didn't even know it. Those toxins are
always there. Even SO2 doesn't kill them. SO2
puts them in suspended animation until the
SO2 levels drop. Bleach would kill them but
then there really would be "toxins" in the
wine. How many "toxins" have people drunk in
this world when the SO2 levels of the wine
they are drinking become low?? Just because
you can't see them doesn't mean they are not
there and it's ironic that the cap keeps
getting pushed into the fermenting must to
kill them. Maybe the fermentation does do
something. Imagine that.


Bob


On Oct 25, 8:57 pm, Paul Arthur
wrote:
On 2007-10-25, Cathy Boer
wrote:


After reading the comments about mold in
primary fermentation stage; we started 4
gallons of apple cider but the temp was
bad and we had green mold on top of the
cider (just apple juice let to ferment by
itself, no yeast or other additives).


We ended up throwing it down the drain,
but could we have saved the juice by
adding yeast???


Any comments/help would be appreciated.
We're new at all this stuff!


It depends on how advanced the mold is. If
you catch it fairly quickly and it's only on
top, you can rack the must out from under
the mold (leaving behind a couple of inches
to make sure you don't carry
the mold into the new fermenter) and pitch
yeast. If it's been growing for a while
toss it, as the mold produces toxins that
will have spread throughout the must and
cannot be easily removed.


--
I just forgot my whole philosophy of life!!!