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Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

Old fashioned wine making.



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-01-2006, 09:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Old fashioned wine making.

Folks,

Just thought I'd share an old family recipe for
step-by-step winemaking (with pictures). My dad was an
Italian immigrant from Calabria and I have fond memories
of watching him make wine in our basement. I kept all
his equipment, including a large press.

Sometimes I read some of the wine making stuff
and it almost seems you have to be a chemist and have
some special equipment to get by. I remember Papa and
he didn't use anything like air locks or hydrometers or
added chemicals to control fermentation...

Of course, I also remember he had a large
vinegar barrel! I think that is where tradition and
consistency got involved. He was very careful and always
did things 'the same way', making minor changes. Taping
the barrel was always an adventure!

Here is the link.
http://www.murtari.org/hobbies -- look for wine section

--
John
__________________________________________________ _________________
John Murtari Software Workshop Inc.
jmurtari@following domain 315.635-1968(x-211) "TheBook.Com" (TM)
http://thebook.com/
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-01-2006, 04:50 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Old fashioned wine making.

Isnt this the second or third time we've seen this post?

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2006, 02:00 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Old fashioned wine making.

Hi John

I enjoyed viewing your website. My father also made wine in a similar way.
However, now a days tastes are more sophisticated and everyone is after that
special vintage wine. The old process can still work but not with
concord/Niagara grapes and there are a lot of risks if the standard
procedures are not followed.

If you love making and drinking wine you should consider some of the popular
grapes (merlot, cabernets, chardonnay, pinot noir ...) whatever suits your
taste. You will also need to study modern wine making. There are a lot of
great cheap books even the library is stacked with them. Also this group
has a lot of experts (not me) that are always willing to help.

Joe

"John Murtari" wrote in message
...
Folks,

Just thought I'd share an old family recipe for
step-by-step winemaking (with pictures). My dad was an
Italian immigrant from Calabria and I have fond memories
of watching him make wine in our basement. I kept all
his equipment, including a large press.

Sometimes I read some of the wine making stuff
and it almost seems you have to be a chemist and have
some special equipment to get by. I remember Papa and
he didn't use anything like air locks or hydrometers or
added chemicals to control fermentation...

Of course, I also remember he had a large
vinegar barrel! I think that is where tradition and
consistency got involved. He was very careful and always
did things 'the same way', making minor changes. Taping
the barrel was always an adventure!

Here is the link.
http://www.murtari.org/hobbies -- look for wine section

--
John
__________________________________________________ _________________
John Murtari Software Workshop Inc.
jmurtari@following domain 315.635-1968(x-211) "TheBook.Com" (TM)
http://thebook.com/



  #4 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2006, 08:17 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Old fashioned wine making.

Joe,

I enjoyed viewing your website. My father also made wine in a similar way.
However, now a days tastes are more sophisticated and everyone is after that
special vintage wine. The old process can still work but not with
concord/Niagara grapes and there are a lot of risks if the standard
procedures are not followed.

If you love making and drinking wine you should consider some of the popular
grapes (merlot, cabernets, chardonnay, pinot noir ...) whatever suits your
taste. You will also need to study modern wine making. There are a lot of
great cheap books even the library is stacked with them. Also this group
has a lot of experts (not me) that are always willing to help.
Joe


Yes, you are quite right and I'll probably do some of
that in the future to take more control over the process. Right
now this is a lot of fun, very low cost, and always interesting
results!

Best regards!
John

"John Murtari" wrote in message
...
Folks,

Just thought I'd share an old family recipe for
step-by-step winemaking (with pictures). My dad was an
Italian immigrant from Calabria and I have fond memories
of watching him make wine in our basement. I kept all
his equipment, including a large press.

Sometimes I read some of the wine making stuff
and it almost seems you have to be a chemist and have
some special equipment to get by. I remember Papa and
he didn't use anything like air locks or hydrometers or
added chemicals to control fermentation...

Of course, I also remember he had a large
vinegar barrel! I think that is where tradition and
consistency got involved. He was very careful and always
did things 'the same way', making minor changes. Taping
the barrel was always an adventure!

Here is the link.
http://www.murtari.org/hobbies -- look for wine section

--
John
__________________________________________________ _________________
John Murtari Software Workshop Inc.
jmurtari@following domain 315.635-1968(x-211) "TheBook.Com" (TM)
http://thebook.com/




--
John
__________________________________________________ _________________
John Murtari Software Workshop Inc.
jmurtari@following domain 315.635-1968(x-211) "TheBook.Com" (TM)
http://thebook.com/
 




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