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Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

effect of magnets??



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2004, 10:06 PM
Vic Whirlwind
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2004, 11:55 PM
Ross McKay
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:06:14 -0500, "Vic Whirlwind" wrote:

I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.


I hear that they work wonders for back pain and sleepless nights when
you embed them in your mattress too. Best used in conjunction with
crystals.

http://groups.google.com/groups?thre...mk% 404ax.com

--
Ross McKay, WebAware Pty Ltd
"Words can only hurt if you try to read them. Don't play their game" - Zoolander
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 12:00 AM
Dar V
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

We've had this discussion before - I wouldn't buy such a thing. Patience is
best.
Darlene

"Vic Whirlwind" wrote in message
...
I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about

a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in

winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic




  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 12:08 AM
Joe Ae
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

A friend of mine just bought one of these. She and her friend believe they
work. The store owner who sold it to them is a friend of theirs interesting
enough.

I don't believe it. I am not a chemist nor a pro wine maker but I would
think that the most magnets could do is temporarily orient the positive and
negative ions in the solution. I don't see how this could change the wine
let alone instill the characteristics of aging (slow oxidation,
concentration, softening of tannins ...).

Joe

"Vic Whirlwind" wrote in message
...
I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about

a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in

winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic




  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 01:39 AM
Greg Cook
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

On 1/31/04 5:08 PM, in article
, "Joe Ae"
wrote:

A friend of mine just bought one of these. She and her friend believe they
work. The store owner who sold it to them is a friend of theirs interesting
enough.

I don't believe it. I am not a chemist nor a pro wine maker but I would
think that the most magnets could do is temporarily orient the positive and
negative ions in the solution. I don't see how this could change the wine
let alone instill the characteristics of aging (slow oxidation,
concentration, softening of tannins ...).

Joe


A magnet has no effect on positive and negative ions. A magnet can only act
on other magnetic materials (eg. Iron).

--
Greg Cook
http://homepage.mac.com/gregcook/Wine

(remove spamblocker from my email)

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 10:47 AM
Rob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

There is no way a magnet could speed up the aging of a wine.
Personally, I'd run (not walk) away from this shop owner, as who knows
what else he's willing to foist off on you.

I will pass along a way to age a very young wine if you want to drink
it right away. Decant half a bottle, place your hand over the opening
of the bottle, and shake like mad for 10 seconds. Do the same with
the decanted portion. It'll age the wine like one of those
quickly-flipping calendars they used to put in movies to show time
passing quickly. About 2 hours later, the wine will be dead as a
doornail from having been completely oxidized, so drink up! Now if
the $40 buys you a set-up where the magnet is a stir-bar like they
used to use in chemistry class that spins and pulls a vortex of air
through the wine, then the owner is not quite as much of a twit as
they sound, but I kinda doubt that's what they're selling.

By the way, I was told this tip originally by a Napa valley tour
guide, and have successfully gotten this to work twice in the past 6
years. I've also heard that leaving a bottle in a hot car trunk for
an afternoon also ages a young wine quickly, but that's just a rumor
that I'd prefer not to try to prove out. :-)

Rob


"Vic Whirlwind" wrote in message . ..
I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 04:34 PM
MikeMTM
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

Rob,

I agree with you 100%. The shop owner sounds like a con artist to me.

Here's another tip for "speed breathing" a bottle of wine. Open it &
pour out about a glassful. Seal the bottle bottle with a Vac-U-Vin
stopper, and pump it to a high vacuum. Slight foaming may appear. (The
next step is not for the faint of heart or weak of hand.) Holding the
bottle by the top with one hand, give it a sharp thump with the heel of
the other hand. This will generate a shock wave which will nucleate
millions of bubbles, thereby eliminating a lot of CO2 in seconds. The
process can be repeated 'til no more CO2 evolves. If you compare the
treated wine to the glassful removed, you should find a marked improvement.

Because no O2 is introduced, this degassed wine doesn't fade like
aerated (shaken) wine.

I wouldn't do this to a Fine Wine, but I've yet to do it to a bottle and
not get an improvement. Hmmm....Maybe I need to buy better wines. ;-)

Luck, Mike MTM




  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 06:42 PM
Ross Reid
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

"Vic Whirlwind" wrote:

I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me about a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic


Why not get one and make it multi-tasking. When you're not fast-aging
your wine with the magnets, you can:
a) strap it to your incoming water line and it will magically soften
your water and de-scale the pipes without the use of salt or other
chemicals.
b) wear it on your wrist or around your neck to relieve the pain of
arthritis.
c) use it to hold notes on your refrigerator door.
d) suddenly realize, if something sounds too good to be true, it
probably is.

Ross
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 11:09 PM
Njord
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

A friend of mine bought one of these from our local beer/wine supplier. He
maintained that it aged the wine. I poo pooed the idea. As I remember from
the little science I had as a kid, magnetism affects only iron, steel,
nickel, and cobalt (whatever that is) and maybe a couple of other things
discovered since then. Well, he said the store proprietor swore by it
personally and let my friend sample a glass before and after. He said he
could taste the difference and bought one. My friend invited me over to
conduct the same test. And, by golly, I could taste the difference, too. So,
my wife bought me one for Christmas. And I still can taste the difference.
BUT, I'm still skeptical. I strongly suspect that what my friend and I are
experiencing is the placebo effect whereby one gets the result that one
expects even if the agent supposedly causing the effect is really
ineffective. Regardless, I guess if one tastes the difference (or thinks
he/she does) and enjoys the wine that what matters.

Anyone want to buy a Perfect Sommelier?

--

Njord

"Lord, your sea is so big, and my boat is so small"

Anonymous

"Dar V" wrote in message
...
We've had this discussion before - I wouldn't buy such a thing. Patience

is
best.
Darlene

"Vic Whirlwind" wrote in message
...
I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me

about
a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It

costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would

make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in

winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic






  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 11:41 PM
David C Breeden
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??


It'd be easy enough to test its efficacy, if you have some
cooperative other party:

Take an unopened bottle of wine. Get your third party to pour two
glasses of the wine. Get your third party to treat the remainder of
the bottle. Get them to pour a third glass, keep track of which
glass is which, and present you with the three glasses. If you can
pick out the two identical glasses, then there's something like a
one in three chance that the thing actually does something.

For the more sophisticated verion of the test, get your third party
to find you a statistician, who can then tell you how many times
with how many wines you'd have to repeat the test before you could
get to a reasonable likelihood (like 95%, maybe) that the thing
actually does anything.

Dave

Njord ) wrote:
A friend of mine bought one of these from our local beer/wine supplier. He
maintained that it aged the wine. I poo pooed the idea. As I remember from
the little science I had as a kid, magnetism affects only iron, steel,
nickel, and cobalt (whatever that is) and maybe a couple of other things
discovered since then. Well, he said the store proprietor swore by it
personally and let my friend sample a glass before and after. He said he
could taste the difference and bought one. My friend invited me over to
conduct the same test. And, by golly, I could taste the difference, too. So,
my wife bought me one for Christmas. And I still can taste the difference.
BUT, I'm still skeptical. I strongly suspect that what my friend and I are
experiencing is the placebo effect whereby one gets the result that one
expects even if the agent supposedly causing the effect is really
ineffective. Regardless, I guess if one tastes the difference (or thinks
he/she does) and enjoys the wine that what matters.


Anyone want to buy a Perfect Sommelier?


--


Njord


"Lord, your sea is so big, and my boat is so small"


Anonymous


"Dar V" wrote in message
...
We've had this discussion before - I wouldn't buy such a thing. Patience

is
best.
Darlene

"Vic Whirlwind" wrote in message
...
I recently went into a wine supply store, and the shop owner told me

about
a
new product that supposedly "ages" the wine in about 30 minutes. It

costs
about $40 and is made mostly of magnets. Has anybody here had any
experience with such a device or know anything about it? If it would

make
it quicker to age my wines, I would be more than happy to pay for one.
However, I do not want to fall for a gimmick designed to lure in

winemakers
who can't bear to wait for wines to age.

I would appreciate any help.

Vic







--
Dave
************************************************** **************************
Dave Breeden
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2004, 11:51 PM
MikeMTM
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

Njord,

Interesting.
Did you happen to notice if the treated wines are a bit warmer then
before treatment? Someone, a while ago, suggested that the effect of
this machine might be to slightly warm the wine through inductive
heating, perhaps, or maybe just plain heat from its coils. Of course,
that would improve , or at least change, the taste of many wines.

Would it be possible for you to conduct a carefully measured test with
an accurate thermometer? All in the name of Science, of course. I know
it's a terrible thing I ask of you, drinking two glasses of wine, but
enquiring minds want to know. ;-)

Mike MTM


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-02-2004, 03:41 PM
Brian Lundeen
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??


"Ross McKay" wrote in message
...

I hear that they work wonders for back pain and sleepless nights when
you embed them in your mattress too. Best used in conjunction with
crystals.

Not entirely true, Ross. Depending on the variety, crystals can be either
positive or negative etherium emitters. Unaged wine is also very high in
etherium, but can be either positive (if it comes from the Northern
hemisphere) or negative (from the Southern). Magnets have been shown to
align the etherium in wine into a coherent polarization which emulates the
process that occurs naturally over time, reducing the harsh effects of
random etherium ordering and creating a wine that tastes smooth and aged.
Now, if you were to bring a crystal of the same polarity into the vicinity,
its etherium contribution would simply be brought into alignment and no harm
done. However, an etherium emitter of opposite polarity would immediately
force the etherium matrix within the wine into non-covalent bonding which
the magnetic field can no longer affect. If this is done, there is a good
chance you will have irreversibly damaged the natural order of the wine and
it might never age properly. Some recent studies suggest that several months
inside a pyramid might unlock the bound matrix, but results are inconclusive
at this time.

Crystals and magnets are not toys, Ross. In untrained hands, they can do
great damage if not used properly. I hope you will educate yourself a bit
more on this topic before handing out advice.

Bwian the Naughty


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-02-2004, 09:32 PM
Greg Cook
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

On 2/2/04 8:41 AM, in article ,
"Brian Lundeen" wrote:


"Ross McKay" wrote in message
...

I hear that they work wonders for back pain and sleepless nights when
you embed them in your mattress too. Best used in conjunction with
crystals.

Not entirely true, Ross. Depending on the variety, crystals can be either
positive or negative etherium emitters. Unaged wine is also very high in
etherium, but can be either positive (if it comes from the Northern
hemisphere) or negative (from the Southern). Magnets have been shown to
align the etherium in wine into a coherent polarization which emulates the
process that occurs naturally over time, reducing the harsh effects of
random etherium ordering and creating a wine that tastes smooth and aged.
Now, if you were to bring a crystal of the same polarity into the vicinity,
its etherium contribution would simply be brought into alignment and no harm
done. However, an etherium emitter of opposite polarity would immediately
force the etherium matrix within the wine into non-covalent bonding which
the magnetic field can no longer affect. If this is done, there is a good
chance you will have irreversibly damaged the natural order of the wine and
it might never age properly. Some recent studies suggest that several months
inside a pyramid might unlock the bound matrix, but results are inconclusive
at this time.

Crystals and magnets are not toys, Ross. In untrained hands, they can do
great damage if not used properly. I hope you will educate yourself a bit
more on this topic before handing out advice.

Bwian the Naughty



Exactly why I only drink my wine when wearing my pyramid hat. I want to keep
the etherium aligned with my chakra.

--
Greg Cook
http://homepage.mac.com/gregcook/Wine

(remove spamblocker from my email)

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-02-2004, 10:24 PM
Pinky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??

From Bwiam the Noughty

Who is taking my name in vain ( vein/vane/vine/wine ---ah that's it vino! )

--

"Brian Lundeen" wrote in message
...

"Ross McKay" wrote in message
...

I hear that they work wonders for back pain and sleepless nights when
you embed them in your mattress too. Best used in conjunction with
crystals.

snipsnip

Bwian the Naughty




  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:32 PM
Gabriel
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default effect of magnets??


"Greg Cook" wrote in message
...
[...]


Crystals and magnets are not toys, Ross. In untrained hands, they can do
great damage if not used properly. I hope you will educate yourself a

bit
more on this topic before handing out advice.

Bwian the Naughty



Exactly why I only drink my wine when wearing my pyramid hat. I want to

keep
the etherium aligned with my chakra.

--
Greg Cook
http://homepage.mac.com/gregcook/Wine


I think that's illegal in some jurisdictions.

Gabriel


 




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