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Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-06-2009, 12:14 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About 2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2009, 07:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About 2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall


Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2009, 07:13 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate


"McKevvy" wrote in message
...
On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some
curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it
at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or
benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to
contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a
starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with
much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice
has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About
2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will
assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall


Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy


Check out the frozen fruit juice concentrates. Here in the US they generally
don't contain preservatives.

Steve


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2009, 11:13 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

I'm in the US, but I suspect that Langer's is made from mostly Chinese
apple juice.

At any rate, I find that most frozen juice concentrates have only
ascorbic (and sometimes also citric) acid added to them. I guessing the
USFDA expects that freezing the juice concentrate greatly reduces the
need for a stabilizer such as a benzoate or metabisulphite.

I concur that most juices transported and sold at "room temperature"
have a stabilizer added to them, making them much less suitable for
fermentation.

Marshall

McKevvy wrote:
On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About 2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall


Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2009, 12:16 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

In article
,
McKevvy wrote:

On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it at
my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a
starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About 2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will
assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall


Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy


No reason to stop. SO2 is normally added at wineries to suppress
natural (unpredictable) yeast. SO2 is bacteriostatic, not bacteriocidal.
The commercial yeast may start slowly, otherwise it should be a normal
fermentation.
--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and
find out for themselves.
Will Rogers

http://countercurrents.org/roberts020709.htm
http://www.tomdispatch.com/p/zinn
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2009, 12:21 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

In article ,
Luc Volders wrote:

Have you tried making wine with these juices.
The sulphite level might just be low enough to get
a fermentation going.

Otherwise you could aerate the juice. That means splashing
the juice from one container to another. This binds free sulphite
and at the same time introduces oxygen in the juice.
Then when using a real strong yeast starter you are likely to get
fermentation starting.

Luc


The SO2 is already bound to the sugar. You would have to hit it with
sodium hydroxide to dislodge it. Unbound is more active in low pH
environments. One splash is good. Like pouring it into your fermenter.

Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy

--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and
find out for themselves.
Will Rogers

http://countercurrents.org/roberts020709.htm
http://www.tomdispatch.com/p/zinn
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2009, 12:23 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

In article ,
"Steve Peek" wrote:

"McKevvy" wrote in message
...
On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some
curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find it
at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or
benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to
contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a
starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with
much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice
has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid. About
2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to 1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will
assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall


Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy


Check out the frozen fruit juice concentrates. Here in the US they generally
don't contain preservatives.

Steve


But are probably pasteurized.
--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and
find out for themselves.
Will Rogers

http://countercurrents.org/roberts020709.htm
http://www.tomdispatch.com/p/zinn
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2009, 03:00 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate


"Billy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Steve Peek" wrote:

"McKevvy" wrote in message
...
On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some
curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find
it
at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or
benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to
contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount
of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a
starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with
much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice
has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid.
About
2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and
the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but
will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to
1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will
assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result
when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall

Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy


Check out the frozen fruit juice concentrates. Here in the US they
generally
don't contain preservatives.

Steve


But are probably pasteurized.



Being pasturized will not affect the fermentability of the juice. The
finished product may have a bit of "cooked" flavor, but absent preservatives
it will ferment.
Steve
--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence
and
find out for themselves.
Will Rogers

http://countercurrents.org/roberts020709.htm
http://www.tomdispatch.com/p/zinn



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2009, 08:51 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Quick wine made from store-bought concentrate

On Sat, 11 Jul 2009 22:00:23 -0400, "Steve Peek"
wrote:


"Billy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Steve Peek" wrote:

"McKevvy" wrote in message
...
On 10 June, 00:14, Marshall Jose wrote:
For about a year now, I've been enjoying (what I find to be) some
curiously
tasty wine made from Langer's frozen apple juice concentrate. I find
it
at my
local Safeway grocery store. Being frozen, it has no sorbates or
benzoates,
but it's got ascorbic acid, which turns out be a bit of a help.

What makes the taste "curious" is that I don't fully reconstitute the
concentrate with water, allowing the higher sugar percentage to
contribute
to the total desired start SG. By doing this, I also raise the amount
of
natural apple flavor above that which would normally be present in a
starting
apple must.

The result is a strong-tasting wine (my family calls it "hooch"), with
much
body and plenty of natural tannin. More importantly, because the juice
has
already been filtered before concentration, clarification is rapid.
About
2
months after fermentation slows, the wine has only a vague haze, and
the
lees are firm (when EC-1118 is used).

Typically, I make a gallon at a time, thus:

- 4 Langer's frozen apple concentrate bottles
- 2.1 liters bottled spring water
- 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
- 1 tsp yeast nutrient
- 2 cups sugar
- 3/4 tsp EC-1118 dry yeast

This liquor will have a SG of 1.115, which the yeast can handle, but
will
produce a high-alcohol wine, If this is objectionable, only add 0.5 to
1
cups of sugar. Fermentation to SG=1.000 will take roughly 10-12 days,
largely due to the presence of the ascorbic acid. Daily stirring will
assist
in degassing the must during primary fermentation.

Naturally, one can wait a reasonable 6 months for more complete
clarification, but I've been surprised by the flavor of the result
when
enjoyed prior to that time.

Marshall

Can I ask which country that you're in please? I used to really enjoy
making wines from fruit juices - a quick and easy way to make wine but
here in the UK sodium metabisulphide has in included in every bottle
of juice for a good few years now....like most things in the UK, if
you enjoy then, given time, the authorities will clamp down on it.

McKevvy

Check out the frozen fruit juice concentrates. Here in the US they
generally
don't contain preservatives.

Steve


But are probably pasteurized.



Being pasturized will not affect the fermentability of the juice. The
finished product may have a bit of "cooked" flavor, but absent preservatives
it will ferment.
Steve



Don't worry. The two cups of sugar will probably overcome any "cooked"
taste -- at least after a few glasses :-)

Cheers,

Bruce
(bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
 




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