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Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

Difference between Active Dry, and Brewers yeast



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2009, 06:26 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Difference between Active Dry, and Brewers yeast

I saw a remark on the net that said active dry yeast leads to more
alcohol content, but has a yeasty taste, while brewers yeast doesn't
have the content, but doesn't have the aftertaste either.
Any truth to those comments?

Tim
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2009, 09:22 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Difference between Active Dry, and Brewers yeast

Tim wrote:
I saw a remark on the net that said active dry yeast leads to more
alcohol content, but has a yeasty taste, while brewers yeast doesn't
have the content, but doesn't have the aftertaste either.
Any truth to those comments?

Tim

If you're talking about the 'dry active yeast' being bread yeast, yes it
has a yeasty taste.
Most wine yeasts have little yeast taste.
Gene
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Old 15-04-2009, 04:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Difference between Active Dry, and Brewers yeast

On Apr 2, 12:26*pm, Tim wrote:
I saw a remark on the net that said active dry yeast leads to more
alcohol content, but has a yeasty taste, while brewers yeast doesn't
have the content, but doesn't have the aftertaste either.
Any truth to those comments?

Tim


Some yeast will tend to leave a bit more "yeasty taste" than others.
Bread yeast will tend to do this. Generally, this fades over time

But the implication that some yeast "leads to more alcohol content" is
wrong. Yeast digest sugars into alcohol and CO2. A given amount of
sugar will be digested into roughly 55% alcohol (by weight, I
believe). So 20 lbs of sugar will yield about 11 lbs alcohol when
fully fermented. I don't believe there is any significant variation
in this between different yeast varieties.

It is true that some yeast have a higher tolerance for alcohol than
others. Beer or bread yeast may essentially be paralyzed when the
alcohol concentration reaches 6% to 8% alcohol. Wine yeast can
normally tolerate at least 12% to 14% alcohol, and the hardier
varieties (with a little help) will get to 18% or so.

So if you use a low alcohol tolerant yeast, you may have trouble
getting all the sugars converted to alcohol. But the potential
alcohol depends only on the amount of sugars, not on the yeast used.

Doug
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16-04-2009, 12:47 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Difference between Active Dry, and Brewers yeast

Doug wrote:
On Apr 2, 12:26 pm, Tim wrote:


So if you use a low alcohol tolerant yeast, you may have trouble
getting all the sugars converted to alcohol. But the potential
alcohol depends only on the amount of sugars, not on the yeast used.

Doug


Thank you for the answer. Just out of curiosity, what is the upper
limit to the content in fermented wines? I have seen some ports that
were fairly high in %, or are those special blended?

Tim
 




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