A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Drinking » Winemaking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

Slowing primary fermentation



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 04:59 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
JG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default Slowing primary fermentation

Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched EC-1118
at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:

1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.

2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering if
what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this fermentation soon.

The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!
Joe
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 06:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Slowing primary fermentation

JG wrote:

Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched EC-1118
at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:

1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.

2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering if
what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this fermentation
soon.

The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of your
wine now.

Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing ML.
--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 07:11 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Slowing primary fermentation

On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched EC-1118
at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:


1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering if
what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this fermentation
soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of your
wine now.

Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing ML.
--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.

Thanks!

JG
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 07:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Slowing primary fermentation

JG wrote:

On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched
EC-1118 at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done
some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:


1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering
if what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this
fermentation soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your
hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of your
wine now.

Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing
ML. --
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.

Thanks!

JG


Some wines are just like that and can't really be explained.
I have 6 gallons of Vidal Blanc that was started in September along with my
other whites and it is just now finishing fermentation. The rest have long
since finished. What is the temperature where it is located? I have a
basement and in the fall when the temperature drops down in the 60's the
fermentations take longer to finish.

--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 07:41 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Slowing primary fermentation

On Nov 25, 10:36 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched
EC-1118 at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done
some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:


1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering
if what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this
fermentation soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your
hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of your
wine now.


Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing
ML. --
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.


Thanks!


JG


Some wines are just like that and can't really be explained.
I have 6 gallons of Vidal Blanc that was started in September along with my
other whites and it is just now finishing fermentation. The rest have long
since finished. What is the temperature where it is located? I have a
basement and in the fall when the temperature drops down in the 60's the
fermentations take longer to finish.

--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Hi Paul,
Yes, the wine is in a rather cool garage (definitely low 60's) and as
such I've been trying to warm it up to help things along. I'll keep
trying to get the temp a little warmer in there in hopes of getting
this sucker finished. In your opinion, should I just practice
restraint and wait it out? Like I said, the wine seems fine aside
from being slightly sweet. No bad odors or tastes.

Thanks!

JG
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 25-11-2008, 08:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Slowing primary fermentation

JG wrote:

On Nov 25, 10:36 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation.
The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched
EC-1118 at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have
done some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a
very small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient
starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:


1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak
of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose
it is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I
am seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am
wondering if what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish
this fermentation soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it
is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and
is a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if
it finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and
gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your
hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of
your wine now.


Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is
undergoing ML. --
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.


Thanks!


JG


Some wines are just like that and can't really be explained.
I have 6 gallons of Vidal Blanc that was started in September along with
my
other whites and it is just now finishing fermentation. The rest have
long
since finished. What is the temperature where it is located? I have a
basement and in the fall when the temperature drops down in the 60's the
fermentations take longer to finish.

--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Hi Paul,
Yes, the wine is in a rather cool garage (definitely low 60's) and as
such I've been trying to warm it up to help things along. I'll keep
trying to get the temp a little warmer in there in hopes of getting
this sucker finished. In your opinion, should I just practice
restraint and wait it out? Like I said, the wine seems fine aside
from being slightly sweet. No bad odors or tastes.

Thanks!

JG


Yep, that is what I would do. Just be patient.

--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2008, 02:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 917
Default Slowing primary fermentation

On Nov 25, 1:41*pm, JG wrote:
On Nov 25, 10:36 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"





wrote:
JG wrote:
On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. *The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. *I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. *I pitched
EC-1118 at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done
some
good but I expected it to be done by now. *Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. *Here are my questions:


1. *I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? *I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. *I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering
if what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this
fermentation soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. *There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. *The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. *After fermentation commences, use your
hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. *What is the SG of your
wine now.


Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing
ML. --
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. *I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. *So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. *The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.


Thanks!


JG


Some wines are just like that and can't really be explained.
I have 6 gallons of Vidal Blanc that was started in September along with my
other whites and it is just now finishing fermentation. *The rest have long
since finished. *What is the temperature where it is located? *I have a
basement and in the fall when the temperature drops down in the 60's the
fermentations take longer to finish.


--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Hi Paul,
Yes, the wine is in a rather cool garage (definitely low 60's) and as
such I've been trying to warm it up to help things along. *I'll keep
trying to get the temp a little warmer in there in hopes of getting
this sucker finished. *In your opinion, should I just practice
restraint and wait it out? *Like I said, the wine seems fine aside
from being slightly sweet. *No bad odors or tastes.

Thanks!

JG- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Stir it too, that seems to help. I swirl carboys that aren't done and
for whatever reason stirring seems to get them going better. I have a
Vermentino and Verdichio that are still around 1% but are still
dropping slowly, the wine is at 60F. Warmer is more effective if
possible.

Joe
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2008, 04:53 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Slowing primary fermentation

On Nov 30, 5:43 am, Joe Sallustio wrote:
On Nov 25, 1:41 pm, JG wrote:



On Nov 25, 10:36 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"


wrote:
JG wrote:
On Nov 25, 9:50 am, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:
JG wrote:
Hey gang,
I have a chardonnay that refuses to finish primary fermentation. The
first signs of primary ferm. started about 6.5 weeks ago. I have 3
vessels and two are at 1 Brix and one is at 1.5 brix. I pitched
EC-1118 at 2 brix 3.5 weeks ago and warmed it and it seems to have done
some
good but I expected it to be done by now. Last night, I put in a very
small amount of superfood thinking the yeast were nutrient starved at
the end of the fermentation. Here are my questions:


1. I see bubbles coming to the top but there is no foam to speak of.
Is it possible to complete MLF and have an off dry wine? I suppose it
is since they are independent processes but I am wondering if I am
seeing MLF bubbles and not Primary Ferm bubbles.


2. I've read about stuck fermentations at = 1 Brix and am wondering
if what I have done will be enough to mercifully finish this
fermentation soon.


The good news is there is still bubble activity but I am worried it is
MLF since it is taking so long to finish. There are no off odors or
colors and I've got the vessels topped up. The wine tastes fine and is
a bit fizzy so I think it can be salvaged but I'd feel better if it
finished soon.


Any advice is appreciated!


Thanks!
Joe


Joe, IMHO, measuring brix post start of fermentation is useless and gives
misleading information. After fermentation commences, use your
hydrometer
and the SG to monitor progress of your ferment. What is the SG of your
wine now.


Without knowing more about your wine, my guess is that it is undergoing
ML. --
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Thanks Paul. I did use a hydrometer rather than a refractometer to
measure, just didn't record the SG. So a little converter tells me
that my SG is somewhere around 1.004 and 1.006. The wine definitely
has a sweet taste.


Thanks!


JG


Some wines are just like that and can't really be explained.
I have 6 gallons of Vidal Blanc that was started in September along with my
other whites and it is just now finishing fermentation. The rest have long
since finished. What is the temperature where it is located? I have a
basement and in the fall when the temperature drops down in the 60's the
fermentations take longer to finish.


--
To reply via email, remove the obvious
Paul


Hi Paul,
Yes, the wine is in a rather cool garage (definitely low 60's) and as
such I've been trying to warm it up to help things along. I'll keep
trying to get the temp a little warmer in there in hopes of getting
this sucker finished. In your opinion, should I just practice
restraint and wait it out? Like I said, the wine seems fine aside
from being slightly sweet. No bad odors or tastes.


Thanks!


JG- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Stir it too, that seems to help. I swirl carboys that aren't done and
for whatever reason stirring seems to get them going better. I have a
Vermentino and Verdichio that are still around 1% but are still
dropping slowly, the wine is at 60F. Warmer is more effective if
possible.

Joe


Thanks Joe! The wine is in 3 gal carboys so I have been able to put
them in a warm water bath (in my sink) and they start bubbling really
well.

I am just concerned that what I am seeing is MLF. I am not 100%
sure of the visible difference between MLF bubbles and primary ferm.
bubbles. I was getting about 5-6 airlock burps every minute. My gut
says that the bubbles are primary ferm. but the SG is not dropping (or
at least very slightly) but that might be a patience problem. I did
stir it and it seemed to get going even better.

Any help is most appreciated!

Thanks,
JG
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.