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Sherry shelf life



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 07:27 AM
Graeme
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Default Sherry shelf life

I wonder if anyone can answer this question?

I have three bottles of sherry (amontillado and fino) that have been
stored for some years in the mistaken belief (not mine) that they
would mature. I'd say that they have been kept for about 5-7 years. I
can see plenty of fine sediment and oxidization (darkening of the
fino) when held up to the light.

These bottles have never been opened and the corks seem fine. Would
they still be drinkable? If so, how should I proceed?

Many thanks.

Graeme
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 08:38 AM
Ron Lel
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Default Sherry shelf life


"Graeme" wrote in message
om...
I wonder if anyone can answer this question?

I have three bottles of sherry (amontillado and fino) that have been
stored for some years in the mistaken belief (not mine) that they
would mature. I'd say that they have been kept for about 5-7 years. I
can see plenty of fine sediment and oxidization (darkening of the
fino) when held up to the light.

These bottles have never been opened and the corks seem fine. Would
they still be drinkable? If so, how should I proceed?

Many thanks.

Graeme


They are probably drinkable, as opposed to manzanillas which would not be. I
remeber drinking some 45 yo Seppelts sherry that was waylaid in a winery
corner which was quite nice.

Ron Lel


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 08:38 AM
Ron Lel
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life


"Graeme" wrote in message
om...
I wonder if anyone can answer this question?

I have three bottles of sherry (amontillado and fino) that have been
stored for some years in the mistaken belief (not mine) that they
would mature. I'd say that they have been kept for about 5-7 years. I
can see plenty of fine sediment and oxidization (darkening of the
fino) when held up to the light.

These bottles have never been opened and the corks seem fine. Would
they still be drinkable? If so, how should I proceed?

Many thanks.

Graeme


They are probably drinkable, as opposed to manzanillas which would not be. I
remeber drinking some 45 yo Seppelts sherry that was waylaid in a winery
corner which was quite nice.

Ron Lel


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 08:58 AM
Cwdjrx _
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Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life

Many finos tend to lose freshness and become a bit stale when they are
stored for several years. In the US I try to buy fino from a store that
has good turnover and drink it soon after purchase.

I would just stand the bottles up for several days or a few weeks to
hopefully allow most of the sediment you mentioned to fall to the bottom
of the bottle. Then pour or decant the fino very carefully. There is
considerable variation in brands of fino, so it is difficult to guess
what kind of shape it is in. Most of the best finos are quite dry, often
are best somewhat chilled, and can be drunk with a wide variety of foods
as well as alone.

My mailbox is always full to avoid spam. To contact me, erase
from my email address. Then add . I do not
check this box every day, so post if you need a quick response.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 11:56 AM
Michael Pronay
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Default Sherry shelf life

"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.

/nitpickmode

M.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 11:56 AM
Michael Pronay
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Default Sherry shelf life

"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.

/nitpickmode

M.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 11:56 AM
Michael Pronay
Usenet poster
 
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Default Sherry shelf life

"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.

/nitpickmode

M.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 12:27 PM
Sammy
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Default Sherry shelf life


"Graeme" wrote in message
om...
I wonder if anyone can answer this question?

I have three bottles of sherry (amontillado and fino) that have been
stored for some years in the mistaken belief (not mine) that they
would mature. I'd say that they have been kept for about 5-7 years. I
can see plenty of fine sediment and oxidization (darkening of the
fino) when held up to the light.

These bottles have never been opened and the corks seem fine. Would
they still be drinkable? If so, how should I proceed?

Hi Graeme

The Fino is almost certainly undrinkable, they are made to be drunk as soon
as they are bottled (or before) and begin to deteriorate straight away.
The Amontillado (a Fino which has been allowed to oxidize before bottling)
*could* be okay.
No harm in finding out, please let us know what they're like.

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside rather than the
town :-).

Regards
Sammy


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 12:27 PM
Sammy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life


"Graeme" wrote in message
om...
I wonder if anyone can answer this question?

I have three bottles of sherry (amontillado and fino) that have been
stored for some years in the mistaken belief (not mine) that they
would mature. I'd say that they have been kept for about 5-7 years. I
can see plenty of fine sediment and oxidization (darkening of the
fino) when held up to the light.

These bottles have never been opened and the corks seem fine. Would
they still be drinkable? If so, how should I proceed?

Hi Graeme

The Fino is almost certainly undrinkable, they are made to be drunk as soon
as they are bottled (or before) and begin to deteriorate straight away.
The Amontillado (a Fino which has been allowed to oxidize before bottling)
*could* be okay.
No harm in finding out, please let us know what they're like.

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside rather than the
town :-).

Regards
Sammy


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 08:25 PM
Ken Blake
Usenet poster
 
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Default Sherry shelf life

In ,
Michael Pronay typed:


"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside

rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.



Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at a
bar in Madrid some years ago.

Tea (chamomile or otherwise) was what *not* what I expected to
get when I asked for manzanilla.

--
Ken Blake
Please reply to the newsgroup


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 31-07-2004, 08:25 PM
Ken Blake
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life

In ,
Michael Pronay typed:


"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside

rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.



Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at a
bar in Madrid some years ago.

Tea (chamomile or otherwise) was what *not* what I expected to
get when I asked for manzanilla.

--
Ken Blake
Please reply to the newsgroup


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2004, 08:41 AM
Michael Pronay
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life

"Ken Blake" wrote:

Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at
a bar in Madrid some years ago.


Yeah, the same happen to me at a camping site and in a restaurant,
both in Pamplona, although in both cases the Manzanilla was listed
under the sherries. In the latter case - after my first attempt at
the camping site - even ordering "vino manzanilla" didn't help.

M.
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2004, 08:58 AM
Mike Tommasi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life

On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 12:25:50 -0700, "Ken Blake"
wrote:

In ,
Michael Pronay typed:


"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside

rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.



Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at a
bar in Madrid some years ago.

Tea (chamomile or otherwise) was what *not* what I expected to
get when I asked for manzanilla.


In fact, you should have said that "manzanilla" is also the name of a
type of sherry. Because "manzanilla" means first and foremost,
chamomile... ;-)

Mike


Mike Tommasi, Six Fours, France
email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2004, 08:58 AM
Mike Tommasi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life

On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 12:25:50 -0700, "Ken Blake"
wrote:

In ,
Michael Pronay typed:


"Sammy" wrote:

BTW, Ron, Manzanilla is Fino: just Fino from the seaside

rather
than the town


nitpickmode

You are right, normally Manzanilla is Manzanilla Fina, although
Manzanilla Amontillada does exist.



Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at a
bar in Madrid some years ago.

Tea (chamomile or otherwise) was what *not* what I expected to
get when I asked for manzanilla.


In fact, you should have said that "manzanilla" is also the name of a
type of sherry. Because "manzanilla" means first and foremost,
chamomile... ;-)

Mike


Mike Tommasi, Six Fours, France
email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2004, 12:32 PM
Anders TÝrneskog
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sherry shelf life


"Ken Blake" skrev i melding
...
Manzanilla is also chamomile tea, as I learned to my chagrin at a
bar in Madrid some years ago.

Tea (chamomile or otherwise) was what *not* what I expected to
get when I asked for manzanilla.

me too, in Palma.
Anders


 




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