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[email protected] 10-08-2007 03:00 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 

I want to drink more red wine for health and also for social reasons,
however, whenever I have a glass or two I get a heartburn.

Which type of red wine is the least acidic?
Merlot?


Mark Lipton[_1_] 10-08-2007 03:24 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
wrote:
I want to drink more red wine for health and also for social reasons,
however, whenever I have a glass or two I get a heartburn.

Which type of red wine is the least acidic?
Merlot?


If you're getting heartburn after a glass or two of red wine, the
problem is almost certainly not the acid in the wine, but rather the
histamines in it. Histamine causes the secretion of acid in the
stomach, and that leads to heartburn. One possible answer is to take a
histamine blocker like Zantac, Prilosec or Nexxium before or immediately
after drinking red wine. Another possible answer is to drink white wine
instead, as they contain minimal amounts of histamines. If, however,
you want to test your theory and try a low-acid red, I'd suggest trying
a soft red wine. Most red wines from hot areas are low in acid, but
many winemakers will acidify the wine with tartaric acid. Try something
like Yellowtail Shiraz for a very low acid wine. As you suggest, most
Merlots from CA are also low in acid.

HTH
Mark Lipton
--
alt.food.wine FAQ:
http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com

Paul E. Lehmann 10-08-2007 11:55 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
wrote:


I want to drink more red wine for health and
also for social reasons, however, whenever I
have a glass or two I get a heartburn.

Which type of red wine is the least acidic?
Merlot?


Do white wines give you the problem? White wines
generally are more acidic, therefore, if they
don't give you heartburn, it may not be an acid
issue.

Mark Lipton[_1_] 10-08-2007 03:20 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Viceversa, when confronted with something that tastes sour, they will
describe it as bitter. I recently had somebody tell me they consumed
large amounts of citrus fruit because it is alkaline and is good for
you, and has very low acidity, and acidity is not good for you.


Not to mention that gastric juice is far more acidic than anything
you're likely to drink. The pH of gastric juice is ~1 whereas few wines
are lower than pH 3, meaning that they are 100-fold less acidic than
what's already present in your stomach.

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com

James Silverton[_2_] 10-08-2007 03:37 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Mark wrote on Fri, 10 Aug 2007 10:20:31 -0400:

?? Viceversa, when confronted with something that tastes
?? sour, they will describe it as bitter. I recently had
?? somebody tell me they consumed large amounts of citrus
?? fruit because it is alkaline and is good for you, and has
?? very low acidity, and acidity is not good for you.

ML Not to mention that gastric juice is far more acidic than
ML anything you're likely to drink. The pH of gastric juice
ML is ~1 whereas few wines are lower than pH 3, meaning that
ML they are 100-fold less acidic than what's already present
ML in your stomach.

It's interesting what people say about acidity. Coffee is a case
in point: it's usually only slightly acidic and sometimes even
neutral. Dark roasted is less acidic than lightly roasted, to
many people's surprise. A simple Google search on say, coffee
ph, can be enlightening :-)

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations:
not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


Steve Slatcher 10-08-2007 09:51 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 02:00:20 -0000, "
wrote:

I want to drink more red wine for health and also for social reasons,
however, whenever I have a glass or two I get a heartburn.


Who told you to drink red wine for health reasons? Your doctor? If
so, ask him/her for advice. I have no idea about your state of health
apart from the fact that you have a stomach problem brought on by red
wine. As a layman, I'd offer the adivice that if red wine gives you
hearburn don't drink it!

--
Steve Slatcher
http://pobox.com/~steve.slatcher

Paul E. Lehmann 11-08-2007 01:25 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Steve Slatcher wrote:

On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 02:00:20 -0000,
" wrote:

I want to drink more red wine for health and
also for social reasons, however, whenever I
have a glass or two I get a heartburn.


Who told you to drink red wine for health
reasons? Your doctor? If
so, ask him/her for advice. I have no idea
about your state of health apart from the fact
that you have a stomach problem brought on by
red
wine. As a layman, I'd offer the adivice that
if red wine gives you hearburn don't drink it!


Steve, having a bad day, are you? Go have a red
wine.

Steve Slatcher 11-08-2007 07:23 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 20:25:31 -0400, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:

I'd have given the same advice regardless of my mood. Can you fault
it?

I chose to open a Vasse Felix Chardonnay last night BTW.

--
Steve Slatcher
http://pobox.com/~steve.slatcher

Paul E. Lehmann 11-08-2007 11:35 AM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Steve Slatcher wrote:

On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 20:25:31 -0400, "Paul E.
Lehmann" wrote:

I'd have given the same advice regardless of my
mood. Can you fault it?

I chose to open a Vasse Felix Chardonnay last
night BTW.


Yes, I can fault it. It was not only rude but
uninformative. The OP came here for information,
not to be put down.

It would be helpful for the OP to find out exactly
is causing his problem with red wine. It is
possible it is the tannin and not the acid.



Steve Slatcher 11-08-2007 03:19 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 06:35:10 -0400, "Paul E. Lehmann"
wrote:

Steve Slatcher wrote:

On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 20:25:31 -0400, "Paul E.
Lehmann" wrote:

I'd have given the same advice regardless of my
mood. Can you fault it?

I chose to open a Vasse Felix Chardonnay last
night BTW.


Yes, I can fault it. It was not only rude but
uninformative. The OP came here for information,
not to be put down.


No rudeness was intended, and I apologise to the OP if he was
offended.

It would be helpful for the OP to find out exactly
is causing his problem with red wine. It is
possible it is the tannin and not the acid.


Yes. Others also pointed out that tannins were probably were the
problem. I assumed he was reading the other bits or the thread too.

If he follows the route of chosing low tannin red wine, he may well
find that he is not getting the health benefits he is expecting. It
sounds to me that the health benefits he is seeking are probably due
to precisely the substances that are giving him a bad stomach. But
neither you nor I know what benefits he is seeking from the red wine,
or why he thinks, or was told, that would be better for him than
white.

So that is the long version of my original post, but it boils down to
the same advice.

--
Steve Slatcher
http://pobox.com/~steve.slatcher

Paul E. Lehmann 11-08-2007 06:33 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Steve Slatcher wrote:

On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 06:35:10 -0400, "Paul E.
Lehmann" wrote:

Steve Slatcher wrote:

On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 20:25:31 -0400, "Paul E.
Lehmann" wrote:

I'd have given the same advice regardless of
my mood. Can you fault it?

I chose to open a Vasse Felix Chardonnay last
night BTW.


Yes, I can fault it. It was not only rude but
uninformative. The OP came here for information,
not to be put down.


No rudeness was intended, and I apologise to the
OP if he was offended.

It would be helpful for the OP to find out
exactly
is causing his problem with red wine. It is
possible it is the tannin and not the acid.


Yes. Others also pointed out that tannins were
probably were the
problem. I assumed he was reading the other
bits or the thread too.

If he follows the route of chosing low tannin
red wine, he may well find that he is not
getting the health benefits he is expecting. It
sounds to me that the health benefits he is
seeking are probably due
to precisely the substances that are giving him
a bad stomach. But neither you nor I know what
benefits he is seeking from the red wine, or why
he thinks, or was told, that would be better for
him than white.

So that is the long version of my original post,
but it boils down to the same advice.


Steve, I make wine as a hobby - about 100 gallons
a year and I have a backyard vineyard of about
100 vines. Tannins come from the skin and seeds
and ALSO from the barrels.

It could be possible that whatever is causing his
problem is coming from the barrel aging. I have
to make my red wine two different ways - barrel
aged and some aged in glass carboys only. My
wife will not drink barrel aged wines.

I realize it may be difficult to find a commercial
winery that does not barrel age reds, but it may
be possible.


Failing that, one could always start their own
production :)

I find that a lot of people who swear they
absolutely do not like red wine for one reason or
another really DO like the non barrel aged red
wine I make.

Of course if you are able to find a non barrel
aged red wine, you have to be sort of careful
because some wine makers add oak chips to
stainless aged wines to impart the oakiness
without the expense of buying cooperage.

Emery Davis 12-08-2007 02:55 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 13:33:15 -0400
"Paul E. Lehmann" wrote:

I realize it may be difficult to find a commercial
winery that does not barrel age reds, but it may
be possible.


I'd guess that more wine doesn't ever see a barrel than does.

Certainly there are many areas of France (Southern Rhone, Loire, South West)
where barrel aging is not traditional, although folks are trying it to get better
scores from RP.

-E

P.S. Thanks to Steve -- who's post I found short but not really rude -- for the
gracious clarification. I know virtually everyone values politeness here.
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to ecom
by removing the well known companies
Questions about wine? Visit
http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


Paul E. Lehmann 12-08-2007 03:12 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Emery Davis wrote:

On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 13:33:15 -0400
"Paul E. Lehmann" wrote:

I realize it may be difficult to find a
commercial winery that does not barrel age
reds, but it may be possible.


I'd guess that more wine doesn't ever see a
barrel than does.

Certainly there are many areas of France
(Southern Rhone, Loire, South West) where barrel
aging is not traditional, although folks are
trying it to get better scores from RP.

-E


Is this the case for red wines? Do the areas you
refer to use stainless for aging? Do they use
oak chips? I have never heard of many areas not
using barrels for red wine. Can you please point
me to some references.

Thanx
Paul







P.S. Thanks to Steve -- who's post I found short
but not really rude -- for the
gracious clarification. I know virtually
everyone values politeness here.



Paul E. Lehmann 12-08-2007 03:54 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Emery Davis wrote:
On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 13:33:15 -0400
"Paul E. Lehmann" wrote:

I realize it may be difficult to find a
commercial winery that does not barrel age
reds, but it may be possible.


I'd guess that more wine doesn't ever see a
barrel than does.

Certainly there are many areas of France
(Southern Rhone, Loire, South West) where
barrel aging is not traditional, although folks
are trying it to get better scores from RP.


I think you mean "where aging in small barrels
is not traditional". Because most wineries in
the areas you mention use (very) large oak
barrels.



As I thought. Thanks for the information. The
VERY large barrels offer less surface area to
volume ratio and therefore the wines can spend a
longer period in barrel without extracting
excessive oak. If I had a commercial winery, I
would use the largest barrel I could afford. The
French do know a thing or two about making
wine :)

Emery Davis 12-08-2007 04:36 PM

Q: least acidic red wine
 
On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 16:24:13 +0200
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Emery Davis wrote:
On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 13:33:15 -0400
"Paul E. Lehmann" wrote:

I realize it may be difficult to find a commercial
winery that does not barrel age reds, but it may
be possible.


I'd guess that more wine doesn't ever see a barrel than does.

Certainly there are many areas of France (Southern Rhone, Loire, South West)
where barrel aging is not traditional, although folks are trying it to get better
scores from RP.


I think you mean "where aging in small barrels is not traditional".
Because most wineries in the areas you mention use (very) large oak barrels.


Well, yes of course! :) Doesn't "Barrel Aged" usually mean small barrels?
I guess I thought it went without saying. Huge oak barrels for elevage
are old wood and (as you know) don't flavour the stuff.

Paul wrote:
s this the case for red wines? Do the areas you
refer to use stainless for aging? Do they use
oak chips? I have never heard of many areas not
using barrels for red wine. Can you please point
me to some references.


Yes, I'm talking about red wines.

This part making is called "Úlevage" in French. I don't believe that in
the regions I've mentioned large oak containers are the only material; I can
certainly think of concrete and PVC as alternatives, presumably stainless
too. The point is that the container is more or less neutral, so the wood
(if wood it is) imparts no flavour to the wine.

I don't think oak chips are authorized anywhere in France, and I certainly
hope this will remain the case forever.

There are many sources of information about French Wines, I believe Parker
has a book so entitled. For the individual AOC regulations you can search through
the INAO site, you will certainly find there is no rule about the recipient of Úlevage
being oak in most places.

-E
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to ecom
by removing the well known companies
Questions about wine? Visit
http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com



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