A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Drinking » Tea
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

Russian tea glasses.



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 12:47 PM
Marten Nilsson
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Russian tea glasses.

Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other traditions
connected with it?

/Marten
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 12:59 PM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.

If you do some serach on this forum you will find several threads on Russian
tea drinking.
Normally Russians drink Ceylon and Indian black teas. Nowadays Chinese and
Japanese teas are getting lots of attention. Large cities have many
sophisticated teaclubs with gong-fu, etc., as my friends who live there tell
me.
Traditionally strong black tea with sugar and lemon made with samovar was
"the" Russian tea.

Sasha.

"Marten Nilsson" wrote in message
...
Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of
glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other
traditions
connected with it?

/Marten



  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 03:01 PM
Derek
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 11:59:53 GMT, Alex Chaihorsky wrote:

Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.


Sovietski Collection is always a bit overpriced. On the other hand, my
mother bought me a set of podstakanniki from them 10 years ago, and I
still use them.

You can also find them on eBay, although none of the ones I saw listed
this morning included the glasses themselves.

However, I have found that they are really only good if you're having
a tea break. They have very little thermal density to keep tea warm
over a longer period of time. As I tend to drink slowly throughout the
course of the day while sitting at the computer, my podstakanniki tend
to stay on the shelf.

--
Derek

If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all those things from ACME,
why didn't he just order a pizza?
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 04:27 PM
Melinda
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sasha, tell me about Russians sometimes adding jam to sweeten their tea
with, I thought I read this somewhere. What kind of jam do they use? Is
there a class distinction between using a sugar lump/cube and using jam?

Melinda


"Alex Chaihorsky" wrote in message
. com...
Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.

If you do some serach on this forum you will find several threads on
Russian tea drinking.
Normally Russians drink Ceylon and Indian black teas. Nowadays Chinese and
Japanese teas are getting lots of attention. Large cities have many
sophisticated teaclubs with gong-fu, etc., as my friends who live there
tell me.
Traditionally strong black tea with sugar and lemon made with samovar was
"the" Russian tea.

Sasha.

"Marten Nilsson" wrote in message
...
Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of
glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other
traditions
connected with it?

/Marten





  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 04:27 PM
Melinda
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sasha, tell me about Russians sometimes adding jam to sweeten their tea
with, I thought I read this somewhere. What kind of jam do they use? Is
there a class distinction between using a sugar lump/cube and using jam?

Melinda


"Alex Chaihorsky" wrote in message
. com...
Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.

If you do some serach on this forum you will find several threads on
Russian tea drinking.
Normally Russians drink Ceylon and Indian black teas. Nowadays Chinese and
Japanese teas are getting lots of attention. Large cities have many
sophisticated teaclubs with gong-fu, etc., as my friends who live there
tell me.
Traditionally strong black tea with sugar and lemon made with samovar was
"the" Russian tea.

Sasha.

"Marten Nilsson" wrote in message
...
Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of
glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other
traditions
connected with it?

/Marten





  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 11:17 PM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

People use many of these, which are more like preserves than jams.
Real tea-drinkers wouldn't do that to a good tea. However there is one
popular anti-cold remedy - raspberry preserve with very hot tea right before
bed that makes you sweat hard while you sleep and really helps to get rid of
cold and wake up and go build socialist paradise like nothing happened.

There are two ways to drink tea with sugar Russian style - just adding any
type sugar to your tea and what we call "wprikusku" - sugar limp tea
drinking (biting off a small piece of sugar and sip tea through it). The
latter is considered to be lower class but is actually enjoyable when sweet
things are in shortage (third month in Siberian taiga). But again - the real
classic Russian tea is strong Ceylon with or without lemon and no sugar, but
many sweet baked things - different cakes and pies (especially pies with
wild berries, like a blueberry, blackberry, black and red currants, etc.).
Believe me a blueberry pie with wild blueberry is nothing like the ones you
find at your local supermarket. My favorite - wild cranberry (also very
different from industrial variety here - it is soft and very, very juicy)
and lingonberry (you can find that at your local IKEA store) - it has very
complicated taste with sour and bitter undertones, very good in pies with
tea. OK, OK, I an salivating drooling and need to grab a can of lingonberry
jam... take care!

Sasha.


"Melinda" wrote in message
...
Sasha, tell me about Russians sometimes adding jam to sweeten their tea
with, I thought I read this somewhere. What kind of jam do they use? Is
there a class distinction between using a sugar lump/cube and using jam?

Melinda


"Alex Chaihorsky" wrote in message
. com...
Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.

If you do some serach on this forum you will find several threads on
Russian tea drinking.
Normally Russians drink Ceylon and Indian black teas. Nowadays Chinese
and Japanese teas are getting lots of attention. Large cities have many
sophisticated teaclubs with gong-fu, etc., as my friends who live there
tell me.
Traditionally strong black tea with sugar and lemon made with samovar was
"the" Russian tea.

Sasha.

"Marten Nilsson" wrote in message
...
Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of
glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other
traditions
connected with it?

/Marten







  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 11:17 PM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

People use many of these, which are more like preserves than jams.
Real tea-drinkers wouldn't do that to a good tea. However there is one
popular anti-cold remedy - raspberry preserve with very hot tea right before
bed that makes you sweat hard while you sleep and really helps to get rid of
cold and wake up and go build socialist paradise like nothing happened.

There are two ways to drink tea with sugar Russian style - just adding any
type sugar to your tea and what we call "wprikusku" - sugar limp tea
drinking (biting off a small piece of sugar and sip tea through it). The
latter is considered to be lower class but is actually enjoyable when sweet
things are in shortage (third month in Siberian taiga). But again - the real
classic Russian tea is strong Ceylon with or without lemon and no sugar, but
many sweet baked things - different cakes and pies (especially pies with
wild berries, like a blueberry, blackberry, black and red currants, etc.).
Believe me a blueberry pie with wild blueberry is nothing like the ones you
find at your local supermarket. My favorite - wild cranberry (also very
different from industrial variety here - it is soft and very, very juicy)
and lingonberry (you can find that at your local IKEA store) - it has very
complicated taste with sour and bitter undertones, very good in pies with
tea. OK, OK, I an salivating drooling and need to grab a can of lingonberry
jam... take care!

Sasha.


"Melinda" wrote in message
...
Sasha, tell me about Russians sometimes adding jam to sweeten their tea
with, I thought I read this somewhere. What kind of jam do they use? Is
there a class distinction between using a sugar lump/cube and using jam?

Melinda


"Alex Chaihorsky" wrote in message
. com...
Russians drink tea from teacups and also thin tea glasses with a metal
holder, called "podstakannik" - or glass-holder.You can find them here at
"Sovetskoj Collection" catalog and web site.
http://secure.sovietski.com/cgi-bin/...ct/View/142211
The best are made of fine silver. The ones above are not and are
ridiculously expensive.

If you do some serach on this forum you will find several threads on
Russian tea drinking.
Normally Russians drink Ceylon and Indian black teas. Nowadays Chinese
and Japanese teas are getting lots of attention. Large cities have many
sophisticated teaclubs with gong-fu, etc., as my friends who live there
tell me.
Traditionally strong black tea with sugar and lemon made with samovar was
"the" Russian tea.

Sasha.

"Marten Nilsson" wrote in message
...
Hi all.

I've heard that in Russia it's tradition to drink tea from some sort of
glass.
Does anyone know what these look like?

What kind of tea does people drink in Russia? Are there any other
traditions
connected with it?

/Marten







  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 12:58 AM
Lewis Perin
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Alex Chaihorsky" writes:

Another uniquely Russian style of low class tea drinking is to drink
it from the tea cup saucer - holding it on the level with your mouth
and drink the tea from it with unique noisy sound for which I have
no English word.


"Slurp"?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 12:58 AM
Lewis Perin
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Alex Chaihorsky" writes:

Another uniquely Russian style of low class tea drinking is to drink
it from the tea cup saucer - holding it on the level with your mouth
and drink the tea from it with unique noisy sound for which I have
no English word.


"Slurp"?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 12:59 AM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Lewis Perin" wrote in message
news
"Alex Chaihorsky" writes:

Another uniquely Russian style of low class tea drinking is to drink
it from the tea cup saucer - holding it on the level with your mouth
and drink the tea from it with unique noisy sound for which I have
no English word.


"Slurp"?

/Lew


Exactly!

Sasha.


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 12:59 AM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Lewis Perin" wrote in message
news
"Alex Chaihorsky" writes:

Another uniquely Russian style of low class tea drinking is to drink
it from the tea cup saucer - holding it on the level with your mouth
and drink the tea from it with unique noisy sound for which I have
no English word.


"Slurp"?

/Lew


Exactly!

Sasha.


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 01:07 AM
Alex Chaihorsky
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Melinda" wrote in message
...
Thanks a lot, those are great paintings. I wonder if Great Britain has
such a collection of pictures of people drinking tea, and if not why not.

I know what you mean about the blueberries...I spent some time in Iceland
and the low-bush blueberries there were all over the place, very tasty. I
never got a pie made from them though. And the people I was staying with
all drank coffee. Come to think of it, I didn't see tea once while I was
there. Not even iced bottled tea.

Melinda


Vikings were always known or their rough tastes and bad manners. Can you
imagine a Viking being invited by a samurai to share tea with a fellow
warrior?
I recently was asked to show my reaserch to a Icelander who happens to be a
friend of a very close friend of mine and just sold his beer business in
Russia and wanted to "better the world" with his money. He never even get
back at me with a polite word of thanks, let alone return any of my
confidential documents. I have no idea if this is common in Iceland today,
but it definitely fits their medieval reputation. In my practice this was
the first case like that.

Sasha.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 03:10 AM
Derek
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sasha,

In the event that I ever fail to do so adequately again, I want to
thank you for rekindling my interest in things Russian. I have begun
to remember that I didn't spend 5 years studying the language because
I fell in love with words that had 5 consonants stuck together. It
always came back to the history, culture and people.

So thank you. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading your posts, have been
reminded of what I had forgotten, and have learned some things new.

--
Derek

Not all pain is gain.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 03:10 AM
Derek
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sasha,

In the event that I ever fail to do so adequately again, I want to
thank you for rekindling my interest in things Russian. I have begun
to remember that I didn't spend 5 years studying the language because
I fell in love with words that had 5 consonants stuck together. It
always came back to the history, culture and people.

So thank you. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading your posts, have been
reminded of what I had forgotten, and have learned some things new.

--
Derek

Not all pain is gain.
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 03:10 AM
Derek
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sasha,

In the event that I ever fail to do so adequately again, I want to
thank you for rekindling my interest in things Russian. I have begun
to remember that I didn't spend 5 years studying the language because
I fell in love with words that had 5 consonants stuck together. It
always came back to the history, culture and people.

So thank you. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading your posts, have been
reminded of what I had forgotten, and have learned some things new.

--
Derek

Not all pain is gain.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rec.food.sourdough FAQ Recipes (part 1 of 2) Darrell Greenwood Sourdough 1 22-11-2004 06:16 AM
rec.food.sourdough FAQ Recipes (part 1 of 2) Darrell Greenwood Sourdough 1 16-10-2004 05:28 AM
rec.food.sourdough FAQ Recipes (part 1 of 2) Darrell Greenwood Sourdough 0 28-09-2004 05:17 AM
rec.food.sourdough FAQ Recipes (part 1 of 2) Darrell Greenwood Sourdough 2 10-09-2004 05:16 AM
Russian Vodka-Can you read Russian? BFSON Wine 4 11-06-2004 02:43 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.