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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

pressure instead of water bath canning



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2006, 08:34 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 4
Default pressure instead of water bath canning

Hi,

Are three any issues with pressure canning high acid items that could be
done in a water bath canner? How would I convert times and pressure
settings?

Using a pressure canner is much more efficient than a water bath.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2006, 01:30 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default pressure instead of water bath canning

kurtk wrote:

Hi,

Are three any issues with pressure canning high acid items that could be
done in a water bath canner? How would I convert times and pressure
settings?

Using a pressure canner is much more efficient than a water bath.


I dunno how you see the efficiency. 10# of pressure for an hour in a small
canner or 5-20 min of boiling water (depending on items, size, & altitude,
of course) for huge batches of stuff. I figger pressure canning high acid
stuff is overkill and overcooks the product. On our FAQ is a list of manuals
and texts that we find useful for any number of things. Where did you find
your info to pressure can high acid foods? And what type of foods are we
talking about? Jam? Pickles? Juices?
Edrena, faithful follower of St. Vinaigrette



  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2006, 02:36 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
KW
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Posts: 325
Default pressure instead of water bath canning


"The Joneses" wrote in message
...
kurtk wrote:

Hi,

Are three any issues with pressure canning high acid items that could be
done in a water bath canner? How would I convert times and pressure
settings?

Using a pressure canner is much more efficient than a water bath.


Kurt visit http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/ for answers on a variety of canning
topics including high acid items.


I dunno how you see the efficiency. 10# of pressure for an hour in a small
canner or 5-20 min of boiling water (depending on items, size, & altitude,
of course) for huge batches of stuff. I figger pressure canning high acid
stuff is overkill and overcooks the product. On our FAQ is a list of

manuals
and texts that we find useful for any number of things. Where did you find
your info to pressure can high acid foods? And what type of foods are we
talking about? Jam? Pickles? Juices?
Edrena, faithful follower of St. Vinaigrette


Edrena, dearie, you are confusing me now....... according to the nice folks
at the UGA NCHFP, it is sort of the other way around.

Tomatoes whole or half packed in juice come with the following rec's:

Elevation
2,000 ft chosen because that is within 195 ft of where I operate (2,195)
Zone 7 in the heart of the NE Georgia Mountains

BWB - 90 Minutes

Dial Gauge Pressure Canner - 40 minutes @ 6lbs or 25 minutes @ 11lbs.

Keith........ who is out of salsa, but still has 22 quarts of tomatoes and
12 quarts of tomato juice left from last year......oh, and the 69 plants put
in the ground this year are all alive and thriving and starting to turn :-)
Anybody gonna need maters in about 10 days?
It will be salsa city within 2-3 weeks! Good thing the Peas and corn had to
be re-planted and are running behind schedule!



  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2006, 02:47 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,039
Default pressure instead of water bath canning

KW wrote:

"The Joneses" wrote in message
...
kurtk wrote:

Hi,

Are three any issues with pressure canning high acid items that could be
done in a water bath canner? How would I convert times and pressure
settings?

Using a pressure canner is much more efficient than a water bath.


Kurt visit http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/ for answers on a variety of canning
topics including high acid items.


I dunno how you see the efficiency. 10# of pressure for an hour in a small
canner or 5-20 min of boiling water (depending on items, size, & altitude,
of course) for huge batches of stuff. I figger pressure canning high acid
stuff is overkill and overcooks the product. On our FAQ is a list of

manuals
and texts that we find useful for any number of things. Where did you find
your info to pressure can high acid foods? And what type of foods are we
talking about? Jam? Pickles? Juices?
Edrena, faithful follower of St. Vinaigrette


Edrena, dearie, you are confusing me now....... according to the nice folks
at the UGA NCHFP, it is sort of the other way around.

Tomatoes whole or half packed in juice come with the following rec's:

Elevation
2,000 ft chosen because that is within 195 ft of where I operate (2,195)
Zone 7 in the heart of the NE Georgia Mountains

BWB - 90 Minutes

Dial Gauge Pressure Canner - 40 minutes @ 6lbs or 25 minutes @ 11lbs.

Keith........ who is out of salsa, but still has 22 quarts of tomatoes and
12 quarts of tomato juice left from last year......oh, and the 69 plants put
in the ground this year are all alive and thriving and starting to turn :-)
Anybody gonna need maters in about 10 days?
It will be salsa city within 2-3 weeks! Good thing the Peas and corn had to
be re-planted and are running behind schedule!


Yeeehaa, I'm a pickle & jam person myself. I want to do my own maters & sauce (I
do like my roasted chile salsa, tho). I plan, someday, for my maters & sauce to
be high acid at pH 4.6 or below. Will add acidifiers if necessary. I think our
good neighbors at the UGA~~~ are postulating that anybody's grocery maters will
do. Yuck. Tomatoids. Real ol' fashion tomatoes oughta be acid enuf, but I'll
test to make sure.
Yeah, I'll see yer maters and raise you a bay leaf tree.
Edrena, peekin' over the deck.


 




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