A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » Preserving
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Hot water bath processing question



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 11:20 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Hot water bath processing question

Hello

I want to make some cantaloupe pickles and googled some great
idea-some origionally from this group!

The question I have is this- the hot water bath processing time
differs from 5 minutes to 15 minutes from when the water comes to a
boil.

I'll be using 250 ml jars (I hate metric- I grew up with Imperial
measurements!) I think this works out to about 8 oz. I just measured
it out...)

Anyway- thanks kindly for any and all advice. I really appreciate your
help.



Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 12:38 AM
The Joneses
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Hot water bath processing question

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:

Hello
I want to make some cantaloupe pickles and googled some great
idea-some origionally from this group!
The question I have is this- the hot water bath processing time
differs from 5 minutes to 15 minutes from when the water comes to a
boil.
I'll be using 250 ml jars (I hate metric- I grew up with Imperial
measurements!) I think this works out to about 8 oz. I just measured
it out...)
Anyway- thanks kindly for any and all advice. I really appreciate your
help.


I love metric, much easier to * and /. Fractions slurp. I made
cantaloupe pickles the first year I started. By then I'd made so many
different kinds I never wanted to taste sweet-sour pickles again. I
thought they were marvelously fragrant, but kinda of a pain to make for so
little gain. And they were deathly sweet. We'd rather have cantaloupes
fresh. If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles. I usually cut 5' for half pints. &
add mins as needed for altitude.
Edrena, lost in the clouds at 4,000 feet.




  #3 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 04:08 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Hot water bath processing question



The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:

Hello
I want to make some cantaloupe pickles and googled some great
idea-some origionally from this group!
The question I have is this- the hot water bath processing time
differs from 5 minutes to 15 minutes from when the water comes to a
boil.
I'll be using 250 ml jars (I hate metric- I grew up with Imperial
measurements!) I think this works out to about 8 oz. I just measured
it out...)
Anyway- thanks kindly for any and all advice. I really appreciate your
help.


I love metric, much easier to * and /. Fractions slurp. I made
cantaloupe pickles the first year I started. By then I'd made so many
different kinds I never wanted to taste sweet-sour pickles again. I
thought they were marvelously fragrant, but kinda of a pain to make for so
little gain. And they were deathly sweet. We'd rather have cantaloupes
fresh. If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles. I usually cut 5' for half pints. &
add mins as needed for altitude.
Edrena, lost in the clouds at 4,000 feet.


I'm not really sure what the altitude is where I am: there are mountains
northwest of here in Collingwood, Ont (for any Ontarians reading this) and
it's part of the system that runs from the Niagara Escarpment and ends at the
Scarborough bluffs in Toronto. In between the limestone escarpment peaks and
then runs underground near Holland Marsh, rises again at Mt. Albert and so on.
It's an up and down rollercoaster ride heading up Hwy 48 (please let an
Ontarian help out with altitude). the 'valleys deep, mountains high'.

Unfortunately it kind of puts me at a loss for knowing how to process. Is
there a safe but happy medium? Would 10 minutes be safe? If it's any kind of
indicator, I don't have problems baking and don't have to adjust baking times
for altitude.

If I had to guess to be safe, I'd put it at 1,000-1,500'.

Thanks for your patience, it's really appreciated!

Annie

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 04:56 PM
The Joneses
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles. I usually cut 5' for half pints. &
add mins as needed for altitude.
Edrena, lost in the clouds at 4,000 feet.


I'm not really sure what the altitude is where I am: there are mountains
northwest of here in Collingwood, Ont (for any Ontarians reading this) and
it's part of the system that runs from the Niagara Escarpment and ends at the
Scarborough bluffs in Toronto. In between the limestone escarpment peaks and
then runs underground near Holland Marsh, rises again at Mt. Albert and so on.
It's an up and down rollercoaster ride heading up Hwy 48 (please let an
Ontarian help out with altitude). the 'valleys deep, mountains high'.
Unfortunately it kind of puts me at a loss for knowing how to process. Is
there a safe but happy medium? Would 10 minutes be safe? If it's any kind of
indicator, I don't have problems baking and don't have to adjust baking times
for altitude. If I had to guess to be safe, I'd put it at 1,000-1,500'.


Annie didja know your community has a website?
http://www.town.collingwood.on.ca/index.cfm
I didn't see anything in particular, but you could call perhaps the town hall who
has property records and have them research it. Maybe the liberry has something.
But first check the survey for your home. Mine is listed there.
Anyone else can check our FAQ which *used to* have a USA link to check elevations
as well as some recipes.. Here's one I found:

http://erg.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/booklet.../elvadist.html

I did find a Canadian site, but didn't check it out cause it wanted to download a
pile of stuff. Purports to have elevations for Canada.

http://etopo.ca/downloads.html#etopo

Edrena



  #6 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 05:23 PM
Brian Mailman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....


Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 06:48 PM
George Shirley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

Brian Mailman wrote:
The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:


The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....



Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/


I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though. I'm not sure if the Canadians have something like the US
Geological Survey but would bet they do. If so you can get the altitude
for any part of the country. I checked mine with my buddies GPS, I live
at every bit of 29 feet above sea level. I don't think I have to make
allowances in canning for that height. BSEG

George

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 08:00 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

In article , George Shirley
wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:
The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:


The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....



Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/


I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though. I'm not sure if the Canadians have something like the US
Geological Survey but would bet they do. If so you can get the altitude
for any part of the country. I checked mine with my buddies GPS, I live
at every bit of 29 feet above sea level. I don't think I have to make
allowances in canning for that height. BSEG


You need a snorkel for your adjustments.

George

--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 01:01 AM
Brian Mailman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

George Shirley wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:
The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:


The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....



Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?


I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though.


I'm told often around here I'm too subtle

B/
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 01:16 AM
George Shirley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

Brian Mailman wrote:

George Shirley wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:

The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:



The Joneses wrote:



soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....


Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?



I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though.



I'm told often around here I'm too subtle

B/


I actually caught it Brian, just couldn't refuse a chance to take a dig
at the folks who live in our biggest national park. Young folks may not
remember it but the Canadian dollar used to be worth about a dime more
than the US one. IIRC the Canadian dollar was pegged to the British
pound at the time. At that time my Canadian friends used to send me
letters offering to exchange my US dollars for "real" money. All good
fun of course.

George

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 02:25 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes

snipped

Edrena


Edrena you're fantastic! Thanks for all the nifty links! I didn't know they existed
and I'm sure going to check them out. Many, many thanks for all your help

Annie


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 02:28 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes



Brian Mailman wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....


Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/


Not necessarily~ two items come to mind:

In Winnipeg, Manitoba the Red River Floods up every year from Dakota
because that area of Manitoba is lower in altitude.

The Mississippi anciently ran west to east until an earthquake changed its'
flow. Origionally the lands were lower west to east.

Only two examples but if you look at the configuration of the Great Lakes
as well as Lake Champlain you'll see other examples too.

Annie

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 02:33 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes



George Shirley wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:
The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:


The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....



Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/


I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though. I'm not sure if the Canadians have something like the US
Geological Survey but would bet they do. If so you can get the altitude
for any part of the country. I checked mine with my buddies GPS, I live
at every bit of 29 feet above sea level. I don't think I have to make
allowances in canning for that height. BSEG

George


Hi George

Yes- our money is lower g It's sort of like a peso compared to the
strength of your dollar:
$1.00 US = $1.50 Cdn (more or less. It fluctuates.)

We also have the Geological Survey of Canada. If you're into rock
collecting, you can buy some superb maps.

regards,
Annie

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 02:33 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes



Melba's Jammin' wrote:

In article , George Shirley
wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:
The Joneses wrote:

soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:


The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....


Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?

B/


I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though. I'm not sure if the Canadians have something like the US
Geological Survey but would bet they do. If so you can get the altitude
for any part of the country. I checked mine with my buddies GPS, I live
at every bit of 29 feet above sea level. I don't think I have to make
allowances in canning for that height. BSEG


You need a snorkel for your adjustments.


LOL!!



George

--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2004, 02:37 PM
soTWEEDLEjourn
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Canadian & USA altitudes



George Shirley wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:

George Shirley wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:

The Joneses wrote:


soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:



The Joneses wrote:



soTWEEDLEjourn wrote:
If you're at or less than 1000' elevation, JOP calls for 10 min.
for pint jars for cantaloupe pickles....


Isn't Canadian altitude some percentage lower than US altitude?



I think their money is a percentage less, altitude should be the same in
metric though.



I'm told often around here I'm too subtle

B/


I actually caught it Brian, just couldn't refuse a chance to take a dig
at the folks who live in our biggest national park. Young folks may not
remember it but the Canadian dollar used to be worth about a dime more
than the US one. IIRC the Canadian dollar was pegged to the British
pound at the time. At that time my Canadian friends used to send me
letters offering to exchange my US dollars for "real" money. All good
fun of course.

George


Hi again

Yes- I'm old enough to remember those days when our dollar was worth more than
yours. Those were short-lived glory days indeed. Then the Liberal politicians
decided that Canada should be turned into a socialists' paradise and our
country went straight to hell (defininately a lower altitude!) in a
handcart...

There was a time when our dollar was pinned to gold as wel. *whoooosh* out the
window and our dollar has been in freefall ever since. Heaven save us from
politicians!!

Annie

 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
H2O PENMART01 General Cooking 0 17-02-2004 09:46 PM
Pressure cooker vs canner - the answer (long) A Preserving 0 04-02-2004 08:04 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 6/7 Henriette Kress Preserving 0 31-01-2004 09:56 AM
Culinary herbFAQ part 6/7 Henriette Kress Preserving 0 31-12-2003 01:09 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 6/7 Henriette Kress Preserving 0 30-10-2003 12:18 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.